Pontus Leander's research while affiliated with University of Groningen and other places

Publications (5)

Article
Full-text available
Tightening social norms is thought to be adaptive for dealing with collective threat yet it may have negative consequences for increasing prejudice. The present research investigated the role of desire for cultural tightness, triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic, in increasing negative attitudes towards immigrants. We used participant-level data from...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines whether compliance with COVID-19 mitigation measures is motivated by wanting to save lives or save the economy (or both), and which implications this carries to fight the pandemic. National representative samples were collected from 24 countries (N = 25,435). The main predictors were (1) perceived risk to contract coronavirus, (...
Preprint
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In this work, we study how social contacts and feelings of solidarity shape experiences of loneliness during the COVID-19 lockdown in early 2020. We draw on cross-national data, collected across four time points between mid-March until early May 2020. We situate our work within the public debate on these issues and discuss to what extent the public...
Preprint
Full-text available
According to health behavior theories, perceived vulnerability to a health threat and perceived effectiveness of recommended health-protective behaviors determine motivation to follow these recommendations. Because the U.S. President Trump and U.S. conservative politicians downplayed the risk and seriousness of contracting COVID-19 and the effectiv...
Preprint
Full-text available
Previous studies suggested that public trust in government is vital for implementations of social policies that rely on public's behavioural responses. This study examined associations of trust in government regarding COVID-19 control with recommended health behaviours and prosocial behaviours. Data from an international survey with representative...

Citations

... Immigrants are more likely to experience COVID-19-related health disruptions because of crowded housing and large household size (Kjollesdal et al., 2022), difficulty with health literacy (Wang et al., 2020), concerns related to testing and treatment (e.g., requirements to present official identification or residency documentation) (Lechuga et al., 2022), language barriers (Caron & Adegboye, 2021), and inadequate insurance coverage (McFadden et al., 2022). Furthermore, a multi-country analysis has shown that the threat posed by COVID-19 has led to increased "othering" of immigrant communities and anti-immigrant sentiment (Mula et al., 2022). Taken together, citizenship status is a social determinant of health, and the "citizenship shield" functions as a protective factor with respect to accessing COVID-19-related health information, testing, care, vaccines, and financial support (Cadenas et al., 2022). ...
... However, saving lives or saving the economy should not be considered as dueling goals. Instead, strategies like public messaging in adjusting the COVID-19 control measures are suggested to mitigate health and economic losses [58]. ...
... However, lonely people may be less likely to seek out contactonline or in person (Lim et al., 2016;van Breen et al., 2020). Furthermore, there is mixed evidence as to whether online behaviour is caused by, or causes loneliness (Boursier et al., 2020;Çikrıkci, 2016;Lim et al., 2020;Morahan-Martin & Schumacher, 2003;Song et al., 2014). ...