Pierre Jaisson's research while affiliated with Université Paris 13 Nord and other places

Publications (56)

Article
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Although cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) have received much attention from biologists because of their important role in insect communication, few studies have addressed the chemical ecology of clonal species of eusocial insects. In this study we investigated whether and how differences in CHCs relate to the genetics and reproductive dynamics of the...
Article
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In social species, the phenotype and fitness of an individual depend in part on the genotype of its social partners. However, how these indirect genetic effects affect genotype fitness in competitive situations is poorly understood in animal societies. We therefore studied phenotypic plasticity and fitness of two clones of the ant Cerapachys biroi...
Article
Prenatal olfactory learning has been demonstrated in a wide variety of animals, where it affects development and behaviour. Young ants learn the chemical signature of their colony. This cue-learning process allows the formation of a template used for nest-mate recognition in order to distinguish alien individuals from nest-mates, thus ensuring that...
Article
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We previously reported the existence of a unique policing system in the clonal ant Cerapachys biroi, where individuals that fail to synchronize to the colony reproductive dynamics and reproduce without control are recognized and executed by their nestmates. These executions help maintain the alternation of reproductive and foraging phases, a colony...
Article
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In insect societies, worker policing controls genetic conflicts between individuals and increases colony efficiency [1-6]. However, disentangling relatedness from colony-level effects is usually impossible [7-11]. We studied policing in the parthenogenetic ant Cerapachys biroi, where genetic conflicts are absent due to clonality [12, 13] and reprod...
Data
Identified cuticular hydrocarbons of species’ chemical profiles. Mean percentages (±S.D) of the different compounds in the chemical profiles of M. ravouxi (M. rav), T. unifasciatus from Anduze (T. uni_And) and Fontainebleau (T. uni_Font), T. rabaudi (T. rab) and T. nylanderi from Anduze (T. nyl_And) and Fontainebleau (T. nyl_Font). Compounds were i...
Article
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Background Social parasitism is an important selective pressure for social insect species. It is particularly the case for the hosts of dulotic (so called slave-making) ants, which pillage the brood of host colonies to increase the worker force of their own colony. Such raids can have an important impact on the fitness of the host nest. An arms rac...
Data
Distances between centroids. Distance between centroids for the chemical profiles of populations of M. ravouxi, T. nylanderi from Anduze and Fontainebleau, T. rabaudi and T. unifasciatus from Anduze and Fontainebleau.
Article
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Social parasites exploit complete societies, on which they are dependent. In ants, slave-making species invade, exploit and raid host colonies, impacting their survival and exerting powerful selection pressure on their host species. Recent studies suggest that host ant species may develop a parasite brood intolerance, which could be the first step...
Article
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Slave-making ants exploit the worker force of host colonies permanently and have to make recurrent raids in order to replenish the slave’s stock. Some of these parasite species exploit different host species and few studies so far have been devoted to host species recognition mechanisms. Here, we tried to determine if opportunist slave-making ants...
Article
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Caste differentiation leading to reproductive division of labor is the hallmark of insect societies. Insect colonies typically contain mated queens that reproduce and workers with reduced fertility that undertake the tasks required for colony maintenance and development. Despite the prediction that the proportion of morphological castes should vary...
Article
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In ants, queen adoption is a common way of achieving secondary polygyny but the mechanisms involved are little known. Here we studied the process of long-term adoptions of alien queens in the facultative polygynous ant Ectatomma tuberculatum. In eight out of 10 successful adoption experiments, all the introduced queens showed similar behavior and f...
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The question of the occurrence of nepotism in insect societies is central to inclusive fitness theory. Here we investigated the existence of nepotism in the facultative polygynous ant Ectatomma tuberculatum because various characteristics of this species may have favored the evolution of nepotistic behavior toward queens. We thus studied worker–que...
Article
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Nestmate recognition is a key feature of social insects, as it preserves colony integrity. However, discrimination of non-nestmates and nestmate recognition mechanisms are highly variable according to species and social systems. Here, we investigated the intraspecific level of aggression in the facultative polygynous and polydomous ant, Ectatomma t...
Article
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Worker sterility in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris is conditional and is linked to the social development of the colony. Workers refrain from reproducing or overtly challenging the queen until gyne production has initiated, at the so-called competition point (CP). It is not known whether this behavior is hard-wired or workers show reproductive pla...
Article
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Division of labor, the specialization of workers on different tasks, largely contributes to the ecological success of social insects [1, 2]. Morphological, genotypic, and age variations among workers, as well as their social interactions, all shape division of labor [1-12]. In addition, individual experience has been suggested to influence workers...
Article
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Social insects exhibit a great variability in their social organization, and this affects colony kin structure, relatedness among nest mates, and population genetic structure. In the mosaic of arboreal ants of neotropical habitats, mutually exclusive dominant ant species occupy different territories, and their nest distribution is spatially aggrega...
Article
We used the experimental paradigm of artificial mixed colonies of two phylogenetically related bumblebee species to analyse the dynamics of the reproductive skew in societies of Bombus terrestris. Artificial mixed-species colonies were set up by introducing callow B. terrestris workers either into a queenright (QR) or a queenless (QL) colony of B....
Article
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In the annual bumblebee Bombus terrestris, the onset of queen-worker conflict over male production is seasonally and socially constrained. Workers will do better if they start to reproduce (the so-called competition phase) only after ascertaining that larvae are committed to gyne development but before the season ends because they gain more by rear...
Article
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Several groups of ants display a reproductive cycle in which two phases of adult activity alternate in synchrony with the brood instars. The brood stimulation hypothesis (Schneirla, 1957) was developed for ecitonine army ants to explain the proximate control of such biphasic cycles. According to it, onsets of cyclic activities are triggered by soci...
Article
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Queen and worker Bombus terrestris have different optima for the timing of gyne production. Workers, being more related to their gyne-sisters than to their sons, should ascertain that gyne production has started before attempting to reproduce. Their optimal timing for gyne production will be as early as possible, while allowing sufficient ergonomic...
Article
To investigate the role of template plasticity in shaping nest-mate recognition processes in ants, we constructed experimental mixed-species groups of Manica rubida with either Myrmica rubra, Tetramorium bicarinatum or Formica selysi. Selecting Ma. rubida as the focal species, we observed the behaviour within mixed-species groups and the transfer r...
Article
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Social insects provide a useful model for studying the evolutionary balance between cooperation and conflict linked to genetic structure. We investigated the outcome of this conflict in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, whose annual colony life cycle is characterized by overt competition over male production. We established artificial colonies comp...
Article
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The bumblebee Bombus terrestris is a good model in which to study the regulation of worker reproduction, because the onset of queen-worker conflicts regarding male production is constrained by the annual life cycle of the colony. Worker reproduction in this species is inhibited until late in colony development. The underlying proximate mechanism su...
Article
The reproductive partitioning generates a persistent conflict within insects societies and a sustained theoretical and empirical attention is devoted to understand its resolution. In that context, thelytokous parthenogenesis by workers is an intriguing phenomenon where each individual is virtually reproducing. This reproductive strategy, scarce amo...
Article
Extracts of Dufour's gland of the ponerine ant, Gnamptogenys striatula, were analyzed by using the combination of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Series of esters of the new homoterpenoids (2E,6)-3,4,7-trimethyl-2,6-octadiene-1-ol (4-methylgeraniol) and (2E,6)-3,4,7-trimethyl-2,6-nonadiene-1-ol (bishomogeraniol) with unbranched medium-cha...
Article
Dufour's gland is the origin of the trail pheromone of Gnamptogenys striatula. Chemical analysis of the glandular extracts revealed a series of new natural products, especially esters of (2E)-3,4,7-trimethyl-2,6-octadien-1-ol (4-methylgeraniol), and (2E)-3,4,7-trimethyl-2,6-nonadien-1-ol (a bishomogeraniol isomer) with medium-chain fatty acids. Bio...
Article
Kinship theory implies that individual social Hymenoptera should be able to identify kin. We tested kin discrimination in the polygynous ponerine ant Gnamptogenys striatula. Mate choice experiments showed that individuals did not pair according to kinship. Experiments on matriline discrimination revealed that workers did not preferentially groom, t...
Article
Summary: The reproductive cycle of thelytokous colonies of Cerapachys biroi was investigated in laboratory conditions. It included several stages, the duration of which was assessed by direct observation on experimental nests set up by fission of natural, queenless, colonies. The results show that two phases of adult activity alternated while cohor...
Article
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Gnamptogenys striatula is a polygynous ant species, in which all workers are potentially able to mate. The reproductive status, relatedness and pedigree relationships among nestmate queens and winged females in a Brazilian population were investigated. We collected all the sexual females of 12 colonies (2–44 queens per colony, plus 2–18 winged fema...
Article
Gnamptogenys striatula is a polygynous ponerine ant, whose colonies contain either several differentiated queens or several gamergates. Population structure, queen mating frequency and deviation from random mating were investigated in a north-eastern Brazilian population. Eight workers from each of 33 queenright colonies and 17 queens and their pro...
Article
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Matriline and the predominant social tasks performed by workers are correlated in the functionally polygynous ponerine ant Gnamptogenys striatula. This result favors the idea that polygyny might have been secondarily selected and maintained in ants because it provided more genetic variability and, thus, more potential variation in the regulation of...
Article
Summary: Ponerine ants display a number of social structures to which particular behaviours are associated. In the ponerine ant species Gnamptogenys striatula Mayr, queens occur and queenright colonies are functionally polygynous. However, some workers are capable to mate and to produce their own worker offspring. These gamergates appear several da...
Article
The knowledge of the social structures of Ponerinae species helps to understand the evolution of sociality in ants in general because this subfamily is often considered as ancestral. Gnamptogenysis among the most derived ponerine genera. We studied the reproductive strategy of Gnamptogenys striatula by laboratory and field observations. The dimorph...
Article
In the ponerine ant, Ectatomma tuberculatum, workers pass through successive functional stages over the course of their adult life. This behavioural ontogeny from brood care to foraging activity appears to be closely related to glandular changes. Intranidal workers have growing or mature ovaries, while extranidal workers have degenerated ovaries bu...
Article
The capacity of the primitive antEctatomma tubercalatumto discriminate between nestmate and alien conspecific larvae in choice situations in relation to worker's age, social status and early experience was investigated. Brood discrimination was measured in terms of behavioural acts (licking, transport, antennation). Only 2-10-week-old adults prefer...
Article
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Summary Results of laboratory-based ethological studies on twoNothomyrmecia macrops colonies with individually marked workers are reported. Interactive behavioural acts constituted less than 1% of all those recorded, revealing a strong tendency by the ants not to engage in social contact. Very few workers performed queen-directed acts. They stayed...
Article
This review illustrates the role of preimaginal experiences in four main aspects of insect life: feeding, habitat choice, host selection, and social relationships. After an illustration of the two former aspects with examples taken from various species, special attention is paid to the two latter aspects. First, an experiment is described, which de...
Article
Host preference was induced during the early development of Dinarmus basalis, an ectoparasitoid of bruchid beetle larvae feeding inside bean seeds. A series of experiments at successive stages of the parasitoid's development showed that host-preference depends on a learning process that takes place after the eclosion of the adult parasitoid but bef...
Article
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Internally mono- and dimethyl branched, internal alkenes, which constitute most of the cuticular hydrocarbon present on workers of the primitive Australian antNothomyrmecia macrops Clark, have been identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. They are the first such alkenes reported from insects. Also present are alkanes with similar carbon...
Article
In most circumstances, social insects recognize their nestmates. They can discriminate against alien adults and also against alien larvae. Results presented here indicate that the mechanism of colony-brood recognition is acquired in large part during larval life and persists through the metamorphosis into the adult stage. During the first days afte...
Article
Groups of 200 young Formica polyctena ants reared from birth in the presence of cocoons for two weeks developed an effective cocoon-nursing behaviour. In the course of varying the age of the ants when first exposed to the cocoons, one test gave a negative result, whereas another test suggested that the first week of exposure to the cocoons is decis...
Patent
Evolution sociale chez deux fourmis mexicaines. Film 16 mm Coul., 27 min. Coprod. S.F.R.S., C.I.E.S. et Université Paris-Nord (versions Fr., Angl., Esp.).

Citations

... For young Polistes fuscatus females, it is critical to have contact with nest material for further amicable behavior toward other colony members occupying that nest (Pfennig et al., 1983). Similarly, the critical period for learning colony odor has been evidenced for ants (Morel, 1983; Errard and Jaisson, 1991). One type of social parasitism, whose occurrence is restricted to ants, is slavery. ...
... Overwintering in the egg stage is known for some Eucharitinae (Clausen 1940b, Heraty andBarber 1990). Overwintering by planidia on their ant host has only been documented for Pseudometagea (Ayre 1962) and Austeucharis Bouçek (Eucharitinae; ectoparasitic and may overwinter on host larva or in cocoon) (Taylor et al. 1993). Overwintering as a planidium on the host may be more common in some groups such as Orasema that rely on the seasonal presence of their plant hosts and have no means of overwintering as adults. ...
... In the laboratory, under our experimental conditions, aggression between the species is rare and brief unless the species have been previously separated. Under these circumstances F. provancheri adopts an appeasement posture resembling sexual calling (Lenoir et al. 1989). However, in mother stock colonies, we observed frequent attacks by F, provaneheri on M. incompleta, particularly on their antennae. ...
... This variability between individuals highlights the importance of idiosyncracy as a controlling factor of polyethism. This idiosyncracy, by increasing the overall response repertoire of the group as a whole, now appears to be a key factor (Fresneau et al. 1987;Lachaud & Fresneau 1987a, b) as a partial explanation for the regulatory mechanisms that allow social insects and vertebrates to establish their social structure and to maintain their social organization. The mechanisms that control this idiosyncracy remain, however, totally unexplained. ...
... Our data suggested that G. striatula workers occurring in modified habitats, particularly commercial crops and urban areas possess some morphological attributes of smaller size than workers inhabiting rainforests. However, G. striatula workers in anthropized areas of the Atlantic Forest in northeastern Brazil possessed similar head width to that of the workers in the rainforest from the present study (see Blatrix and Jaisson, 2001). ...
... However, the fact that phylogenetically distant species often fail to compose a mixed-species group, also indicate a possible innate, genetically predetermined, propensity for recognizing a specific CHC profile. An alternative explanation may be preimaginal learning of colony odor [74,75] and consequently a preformed template before adult emergence. Upon emergence the callow ants are groomed by their nestmate nurse-ants, thereby experiencing the first acquisition of nestmate CHC composition. ...
... Two ants are involved in the tandem running -the leader, which knows the exact location of the food source, and the follower, which is naïve. When the leader finds the food source, she comes back to the nest and recruits a nestmate by doing "back and forth" movements toward the naïve ant ("jerking") (Lenoir & Jaisson, 1982). The leader will then go to the food source with the follower behind. ...
... Age can also affect CHC profiles, although in ants this is often confounded with behavioral caste. Callows often, but not always have fewer CHCs Johnson & Sundström 2012;Teseo et al. 2014). Depending on the sensitivity of the analyzing device, this can produce apparent (but false) differences in composition, because at lower concentrations, small peaks will not be detected. ...
... Moreover, in social insects, differences in provisioning regimes can have profound consequences on gene expression (Vojvodic et al., 2015) and the developmental fate of females (queens and workers). In O. biroi, ants of different genotypes have been found to interact differently with brood (dedicating different proportions of their time to nursing), meaning that IGEs would be expected to influence development, and therefore brain gene expression upon eclosion (Teseo et al., 2014;Ulrich et al., 2021;Vojvodic et al., 2015). ...
... Data were analysed using the software Agilent MassHunter Qualitative Analysis B.07.00. Compounds present in the extracts were identified using mass spectral libraries as reported above and for cuticular hydrocarbons through manual identification of spectra and comparison with those reported in literature [16][17][18][19][20] . The relative abundance of each compound was calculated as the percentage of the area underlying the peak total ion chromatogram (TIC) with respect to the sum of the area of the peaks present. ...