Philipp Frey's research while affiliated with Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and other places

Publications (13)

Book
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Zukunftsvisionen sind in allen Bereichen der Gesellschaft wirkmächtig, in Wissenschaft und Politik wie in Zivilgesellschaft und Massenmedien. Seit 2012 entwickeln Wissenschaftler:innen am Institut für Technikfolgenabschätzung und Systemanalyse das „Vision Assessment“ als einen für die empirische Erforschung von Visionen als sozio-epistemische Prakt...
Article
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In recent years, fears of technological unemployment have (re-)emerged strongly in public discourse. In response, policymakers and researchers have tried to gain a more nuanced understanding of the future of work in an age of automation. In these debates, it has become common practice to signal expertise on automation by referencing a plethora of s...
Article
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Due to the innovative possibilities of digital technologies, the issue of increasing automation is once again on the agenda – and not only in the industry, but also in other branches and sectors of contemporary societies. Although public and scientific discussions about automation seem to raise relevant questions of the “old” debate, such as the re...
Article
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Der vorliegende Beitrag diskutiert vor dem Hintergrund der gegenwärtigen Dominanz ökonomischer Akteure in der Entwicklung und dem Einsatz von Technik, inwiefern das Einstehen der Technikfolgenabschätzung (TA) für eine demokratische Gestaltung des technischen Wandels durch Wirtschaftsdemokratie erweitert werden könnte. Anschließend werden einige Gru...
Article
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This article examines the political function of state-sponsored proclamations of future technological developments with regard to the German example of 'Industrie 4.0'. Building on a comparison of two classical texts of the literary genre of utopianism, Bacon's Nova Atlantis and Morus' Utopia , the article argues that the future visions of 'Industr...
Book
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This book traces how the current wave of industrial digitalization relates to processes of domination and emancipation. It aims to counter techno-deterministic narratives that would connect a perceived new ‘industrial revolution’ with clear-cut societal consequences. In order to do this, the volume intervenes into three ongoing discussions which pe...
Chapter
How do different movements enact certain visions of emancipation and technology? In this chapter, Frey and Schneider discuss Marx’s classic framework of emancipation from and emancipation within work and its relationship to technology. The chapter combines this critical tradition together with a social-constructivist framework of technology and ana...
Article
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Since industrialization, the relationship between technological change and work structures has been a complex one whose implications have been frequently described and interpreted. With regard to the deep influence of technology on work structures, the discussion is still characterized by the work of Karl Marx, who studied the emergence of industri...
Conference Paper
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The first International Joint Meeting on Digitalization and the Future of Work was organised by the Research Group on Technology and Work of the Institute for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany), by the Observatory of Technology Assessment, CICS.NOVA, University NOVA Lisbon (Portugal), and by coll...
Book
Full-text available
Was bedeuten ›Virtuelle Realität‹, Industrie 4.0, ›Künstliche Intelligenz‹ und nicht zuletzt das neueste Smartphone für die Zukunft unserer Gesellschaft? Debatten über technische Umwälzungen und damit einhergehende post-kapitalistische Perspektiven sind auch unter Linken von tiefen Ambivalenzen geprägt: Roboter gefährden Arbeitsplätze, könnten die...

Citations

... The most prominent and cited of these is the seminal study first published online by Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne in 2013 in which 47% of the US workforce was estimated to be under high risk (70% probability or more) of computerization (automation by computer-controlled equipment) in the following decades [5]. Following the success of this study, many others applied its methodology worldwide finding different results: UK (35%), Canada (42%), Germany (42%), Switzerland (48%), Uzbekistan (55%), Brazil (60%), and Ethiopia (85%) [6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13]. ...
... As the authors write, 'when bubbles burst, it helps to have allies,' and they specifically mention open science, citizen science and the responsible technology movement. One could add and to some extent subsume here, alliances with the non-academic working classes and other marginalised social groups, which is in line with recent work on and in emancipatory technology studies (Frey, Schaupp, and Wenten 2021;Woodcock 2021). For RRI, this means in particular opening up public engagement activities, which are often limited to what in German is called Bildungsbürgertum, the educated (middle) classes (Humm, Schrögel, and Leßmöllmann 2020). ...
... Which labor ought to be automated and which should be left to humans on normative grounds? Do capital owners get to decide autocratically what technology is used for or is this decision democratized [50]? What are the actual needs of workers? ...
... One year later, the EU announced its plan to increase investment in AI research by at least €20 billion by 2020 (Dyer-Witheford et al., 2019, p. 40). These programs may be interpreted as techno-political responses to the financial crisis on the state level (Frey & Schaupp, 2020). ...
... Instead, a care perspective acknowledges the interdependencies that all life is based on without relating them only to dynamics of power and oppression. By rejecting dependency as a form of universal domination, "we are able to identify forms of social action that cannot be explained within a framework of domination, such as solidarity [and] mutual support" ( [71], p. 7), as Meyer et al. discuss in their study on the emancipatory potential of industrial production. ...
... This would not, however, imply to shy away from the discussion of technological development altogether and emphasize solely political issues. Instead, it would require scientists to explore ways to commission technology in the interest of societal progress -while at the same time emphasizing that societal progress will not result from technological development by itself, but rather might the product of people striving to realize political utopias and the technologies suitable to them (Frey/Schneider 2019;Srnicek/Williams 2015). Rather than fetishizing either the political or the technological dimension of utopia, progressive techno-political projects would strive to reconcile the two in a push for truly radical socio-technical change. ...