Philip L. Kilbride's research while affiliated with University of Missouri and other places

Publications (8)

Article
Baganda infants in Uganda were found to be significantly advanced in motor development during the first year of life when compared with Bayley's sample of American White and Black infants. Though they were not found to be as precocious as Geber's sample of Uganda infants, the same downward trend in degree of motor development during the second year...
Article
Data collected among the Baganda of Uganda indicates that pictorial perceptual skills are positively and significantly related to relative amounts of exposure to Western culture. Both urban and relatively more acculturated rural residents make overall more correct identifications of pictorial objects and more consistent use of cues to pictorial dep...

Citations

... Similar to research being done by the Whitings, Kilbrides, LeVine, Weisner, and others in British East Africa over decades (e.g., Whiting and Whiting 1975; Kilbride 1979;Kilbride and Kilbride 1990;Levine et al. 1994;LeVine 1981;Weisner et al. 1997), Uganda was the site of much anthropological research about families. Initially, the emphasis was on family structure, shifting towards an interest in household economics, social change, and more recently, the breakdown of familial ties. ...
... Our approach is grounded in cultural theories of development, including ecocultural theory (ECT; Harkness & Kilbride, 1983;Harkness & Super, 1983;Harwood, Miller, & Irizarry, 1995;Weisner, 2002) and sociocultural theory (Rogoff, 2003;Rogoff, Mistry, Göncü, & Mosier, 1993). In these theories, beliefs are part of what ties individuals together into community rather than isolated within-person phenomena (Rogoff, 2003). ...
... For example, researchers found that Koisan people from rural South Africa were not susceptible to the Müller-Lyer illusion (Segall, Campbell, & Herskovits, 1966) and South African participants from rural areas were less susceptible to the rotating-trapezoid-window illusion than South African participants from urban areas (Allport & Pettigrew, 1957). 3 Extension of these findings with a depth perception test developed by Hudson (1960) showed that participants from rural traditional societies in South Africa (Hudson, 1960), Ghana (Jahoda & McGurk, 1974;Mundy-Castle, 1966), and Uganda (Kilbride & Robbins, 1969) were less likely to perceive depth in pictures than participants from comparable urban samples. The most commonly heard explanation for these differences in visual perception is that people from urban societies are exposed more frequently to rectangular shapes, writing, illustrations, and photographs than people from African rural societies. ...
... Although holding was a frequent practice used by Gamo mothers to calm distressed infants, holding was not described as an emotional act but rather simply as a way to stop infant fussing and crying. Kilbride and Kilbride (1983) described this as "low positive affect" in the mother-infant relationship, which is consistent among many agricultural societies; however, variations in this pattern of behavior among agriculturalists have been found (Kilbride & Kilbride, 1983;LeVine, 1970;Super & Harkness, 1974). ...
... They establish a lot of face-to-face interactions with mutual gazing and accordingly use imitation of their infants' emotional expressions to reinforce and maintain their expression of positive emotions (Fahrman, Mazzaglia, & Jonsson, 1991;Jonsson et al., 2001;Keller et al., 2004;Kokkinaki, 2003;Nadel, 2002). In contrast, caregivers from interdependent sociocultural contexts in rural African, Indian, Palestinian, and Bedouin agricultural societies (Feldman, Masalha, & Alony, 2006;Keller, 2007;Kilbride & Kilbride, 1974;Konner, 1976;Landau, 1977) socialize their infants toward relatedness (e.g., obey parents, share with others, and facilitate social harmony), and thus toward the minimization of their infants' negative emotions. Accordingly, they use more proximal parental behavioral strategies (e.g., body contact and body stimulation) to regulate infants' negative emotions and foster a "calm infant" (Kärtner et al., 2010;Keller et al., 2004;Richman, Miller, & LeVine, 1992). ...
... "American Black" is a term that emerges in anthropological literature as a way to differentiate "Black" individuals from Africa (i.e., "African Blacks") from "Black" individuals in the U.S. (i.e., "American Blacks") (e.g., Bodmer & Bodmer 1970;Kilbride et al. 1970). "American Black" is not a term within the US census, although, it appears frequently throughout the JFS literature evaluated here, beginning in 1976 (Burns & Maples 1976) and continuing into 2019 (Spiros & Hefner 2019). ...