Peter W. Hill's research while affiliated with University of Melbourne and other places

Publications (16)

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A large scale longitudinal study into the cognitive and affective development of pupils in Australian schools between kindergarten and grade 11, shows stagnation both in math and language in the middle years of schooling. Moreover, attitudes towards schools are rapidly declining during this stage. Building on the educational effectiveness knowledge...
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This article argues that the paradigm within which educational effectiveness has been studied has reached the end of its ‘use‐by date’ and that a new paradigm is beginning to emerge that fully integrates research into educational effectiveness with ongoing processes of school improvement and reform. Examples are given of the kind of studies that ha...
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Long-standing and enduring problems in quantitative studies of educational effectiveness relate to fitting models that adequately reflect the complex inter-relationships among multivariate, multilevel factors affecting students’ educational progress, particularly among those that operate within classrooms. This article illustrates one approach to s...
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It is argued that a crucial requirement in studies of educational effectiveness is the modelling of change or growth in student learning. To illustrate one approach to achieving this end, results are presented from multivariate multilevel analyses of three‐waves of data for three Grade level cohorts of students from a longitudinal study designed to...
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This paper presents a method for handling educafional data in which students belong to more than one unit at a given level, but there is missing information on the identification of the units to which students belong. For example, a student might be classified as belonging sequentially to a particular combina- tion of primary and secondary school,...
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Despite the best efforts of teachers, a significant proportion of students continue to fail to achieve success in early literacy at school, with severe consequences for their subsequent educational progress, career opportunities, and life chances. In this article, we report results arising from an initial evaluation of a project to develop and impl...
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THIS paper briefly outlines the dilemma confronting assessment and certification authorities in ensuring comparability of end-of-school assessments and proceeds to outline approaches adopted in Victoria following the introduction of the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE). In particular, a description is provided of a new system for maximising...
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In response to persistent concerns about limitations endemic to the exclusive use of standardised tests and examinations for student assessment and standards monitoring, one approach to addressing these concerns in Victoria (Australia) since 1986 has been the development and use of ‘subject profiles’ as frameworks’ for assessing, recording and repo...
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Fifteen years ago, Burstein (1980) argued that the key to methodological progress in studies of classroom and school effects depended on the development of appropriate models and methods for the analysis of multilevel data. Considerable progress has been made in the intervening years such that anyone familiar with the growing school effectiveness r...
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There has been a growing awareness among educational researchers of the consequences of using data-analytic models that fail to account for the inherent clustered or hierarchical sampling structure of the data typically obtained. Such clustering poses special analytic problems related to levels of analysis, aggregation bias, heterogeneity of regres...
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The challenge that confronts agencies responsible for assessment and reporting in the senior secondary school is to extend systematic assessment procedures to a broader range of learning outcomes than those currently assessed by public examinations, to develop methods of reporting which are more descriptive of individual achievement and which provi...
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Over the last quarter of a century, the emphasis on accountability for student learning outcomes, and the findings from effective schools research, have served to draw attention to the role of heads as educational leaders. At the same time, the growing complexity of the role of the school head has meant that they have often been diverted into other...

Citations

... Understanding the uniqueness of this age group, middle level education researchers have long advocated for specialized preparation of teachers of YAs who are specifically trained to teach and reach this age group (Hill & Russell, 1999;Jackson & Davis, 2000;McEwin & Smith, 2013;NMSA, 2010). Knowing and making use of developmentally appropriate teaching practices is critical to effective teaching and learning (Horowitz, Darling-Hammond, & Bransford, 2005), especially during early adolescence (AMLE, 2012;Caskey & Anfara, 2014;NMSA, 2010). ...
... As part of the VCE assessment procedures, a fourth measure of students' 'ability' has been obtained from their scores on the General Achievement Test (GAT). While student GAT scores are not included in the final achieved study scores, they are used as an administrative, quality control device to identify those school-based assessed CAT scores that appear to be either over-scored or under-scored, in relation to what could reasonably be predicted from GAT scores (see Hill, Brown, Rowe & Turner, 1997). ...
... Performance assessment (PA) as a "situated" mode of assessment suggests that the test items should require some kind of active demonstration of the knowledge in question rather than a prepositional account of it (Moss, 1992). Some actions are required in a realistic setting, involving enactment of a skill or problem solving (Masters & Hill, 1988; Wiggins, 1989). Actual performance will be observed as verbal, non-verbal, fine motor skills, gross motor skills, or a combination of these. ...
... Parents have an obvious role to play. They support the school's efforts in terms of supplying pupils, helping with homework, fundraising, acting as unpaid assistants and generally providing the liaison between school and home which is viewed by school effectiveness research as a prerequisite to educational success (Levine & Lezotte, 1990;Rowe, Hill, & Holmes-Smith, 1995). Parental supports and their social economic status provide significant relational capital for school organizations. ...
... For example, a shared belief in the capacity of all students to achieve. These shared beliefs and understandings need to be supported by practices across eight domains, outlined by Hill and Crévola (1999) as: leadership and co-ordination; standards and targets; monitoring and assessment; classroom teaching strategies; professional learning teams; school and class organisation; intervention and assistance; and home, school and community partnerships. ...
... To answer our second and third questions, we compared program effects on ELOM scores at endline using multi-level mixed modeling (Field et al., 2012). This procedure takes account of nested data and is often used in education studies (Creemers & Kyriakides, 2006;Gorard, 2003;Rowe & Hill, 1998;Sammons et al., 2005). Multi-level modeling permits us to remove potential confounds at the playgroup facilitator level, within each program. ...
... Many factors have been identified, but one consistent finding has been the important role of school leadership in the process (Hallinger, 2011;Leithwood, Day, Sammons, Harris, & Hopkins, 2006). A second factor found to make a major impact on student learning, through more than two decades of research, is the specific classroom, and the teacher, that a student might have (Gess-Newsome et al., 2019;Hattie, 2012;Hill, 1998). Together, these two factors are powerful predictors of student learning, as Barber, Whelan, and Clark (2010, p. 5) concluded: 'nearly 60 per cent of a school's impact on student achievement is attributable to principal and teacher effectiveness'. ...
... Therefore identifying the determinants of academic performance is important for not only educational outcome but also correct understanding of mechanisms underlying professional development. Factors associated with Academic Performance of students have been broadly categorized into the institution-level and student-level factors (Hill & Rowe, 1996). Institutions-level factors such as teacher's characteristics, class size, physical resources and learning environment plays pivotal role in student performance (Akram & Shah, 2018;Ozel et al., 2013;Uy, Manalo & Cabauatan, 2015;Ma, Ma, & Bradley, 2008;Darling-Hammond, 2000). ...
... 22). Analysing the literacy and numeracy achievements of more than 13,700 Australian primary and secondary students, Hill and Rowe [15] found that the teacher factor accounts for as high as 45% and 55%, respectively, of variance in students' performance in literacy and numeracy, revealing once again the powerful teacher factor in promoting academic performance. ...
... For example, Supovitz and Klein (2003) described a literacy coach in an elementary school who utilized running records (e.g., Crévola & Hill, 1998) as a way to measure students' reading comprehension. ...