Peter Novick's research while affiliated with CUNY Graduate Center and other places

Publications (13)

Article
Full-text available
Proteolytic enzymes are ubiquitous and active in a myriad of biochemical pathways. One type, the rhomboids are intramembrane serine proteases that release their products extracellularly. These proteases are present in all forms of life and their function is not fully understood, although some evidence suggests they participate in cell signaling. St...
Article
Full-text available
Transposable elements (TEs) have the potential to impact genome structure, function and evolution in profound ways. In order to understand the contribution of transposable elements (TEs) to Heliconius melpomene, we queried the H. melpomene draft sequence to identify repetitive sequences. We determined that TEs comprise ~25% of the genome. The predo...
Article
Full-text available
DNA transposons have considerably affected the size and structure of eukaryotic genomes and have been an important source of evolutionary novelties. In vertebrates, DNA transposons are discontinuously distributed due to the frequent extinction and recolonization of these genomes by active elements. We performed a detailed analysis of the DNA transp...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of the amniotic egg was one of the great evolutionary innovations in the history of life, freeing vertebrates from an obligatory connection to water and thus permitting the conquest of terrestrial environments. Among amniotes, genome sequences are available for mammals and birds, but not for non-avian reptiles. Here we report the geno...
Article
In animals, the mode of transmission of transposable elements is generally vertical. However, recent studies have suggested that lateral transfer has occurred repeatedly in several distantly related tetrapod lineages, including mammals. Using transposons extracted from the genome of the lizard Anolis carolinensis as probes, we identified four novel...
Article
Full-text available
The genome of the lizard Anolis carolinensis (the green anole) is the first nonavian reptilian genome sequenced. It offers a unique opportunity to comparatively examine the evolution of amniote genomes. We analyzed the abundance and diversity of non-LTR (long terminal repeat) retrotransposons in the anole using the Genome Parsing Suite. We found th...

Citations

... Site-specific insertion of R1 and R2 LINE superfamilies near the 28S ribosomal RNA genes ensured its propagation while there is also evidence of another LINE superfamily successfully maintaining itself through non-site-specific insertion [65][66][67][68]. Different LINEs superfamilies can be found in the different insect genomes and each of these superfamilies could cause different effects depending on the type and the area of insertion [28,34,61,69]. The consequences of the low distribution of LINEs within the whitefly species complex are unknown and an exploration of these elements in the wider context of insect evolution is warranted. ...
... The de novo transcriptomes were supplied to the argument "est", along with protein datasets for all annotated protein-coding genes of Anolis carolinensis (Alfoldi et al. 2011), Python molurus bivittatus (Castoe et al. 2013), Thamnophis sirtalis (Perry et al. 2018), Ophiophagus Hannah (Vonk et al. 2013), and Deinagkistrodon acutus (Yin et al. 2016) supplied to the argument "protein". An initial round of MAKER was run with default settings, except that we specified max_dna_len = 300,000 and split_hit = 20,000. ...
... They consist of four subgroups: DDE transposons that mobilized by a cut-and-paste mechanism mediated by a transposase, Cryptons that use a tyrosine recombinase for their transposition, Helitrons that use a rolling-circle mode of replication [28,29], and Mavericks that are mobilized by a self-synthetizing process mediated by a protein-primed polymerase B [30,31]. Class II elements can also mediate the transposition of non-autonomous copies, which can outnumber autonomous copies [32][33][34]. ...
... Many publications have been written after the discovery of HT, detailing this activity in numerous orders of animals, including arthropods, mammals, reptiles, etc. It has been demonstrated that these events can occur across lineage and distant taxa [71,[79][80][81][82][83]. Many HT events have been identified to date, with approximately one-third of them being related to elements of the Tc1/mariner superfamily [78]. ...
... In contrast to snakes, L1s are abundant components (6%) in mammalian genomes [171], but are unable to transpose [172][173][174]. The relatively low copy number of L1s, with few full-length (active) copies, may be the result of a "purifying selection" that is very relaxed in snakes [40,[175][176][177]. A recent study demonstrated that full-length L1s are subject to purifying selection in the human genome, while truncated L1s are essentially neutral [178]. ...