Peter Hagoort's research while affiliated with Radboud University and other places

Publications (459)

Article
According to the language marker hypothesis language has provided homo sapiens with a rich symbolic system that plays a central role in interpreting signals delivered by our sensory apparatus, in shaping action goals, and in creating a powerful tool for reasoning and inferencing. This view provides an important correction on embodied accounts of la...
Preprint
Full-text available
Words are not processed in isolation, instead they are commonly embedded in phrases and sentences. The sentential context influences the perception and processing of a word. However, how this is achieved by brain processes and whether predictive mechanisms underlie this process remains a debated topic. To this end we employed an experimental paradi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Neuron models with explicit dendritic dynamics have shed light on mechanisms for coincidence detection, pathway selection, and temporal filtering. However, it is still unclear which morphological and physiological features are required to capture these phenomena. In this work, we introduce the Tripod neuron model and propose a minimal structural re...
Article
Full-text available
Vocal learning, the ability to produce modified vocalizations via learning from acoustic signals, is a key trait in the evolution of speech. While extensively studied in songbirds, mammalian models for vocal learning are rare. Bats present a promising study system given their gregarious natures, small size, and the ability of some species to be mai...
Article
Understanding spoken language requires transforming ambiguous acoustic streams into a hierarchy of representations, from phonemes to meaning. It has been suggested that the brain uses prediction to guide the interpretation of incoming input. However, the role of prediction in language processing remains disputed, with disagreement about both the ub...
Preprint
During listening, brain activity tracks the rhythmic structures of speech signals. Here, we directly dissociated the contribution of neural tracking in the processing of speech acoustic cues from that related to linguistic processing. We examined the neural changes associated with the comprehension of Noise-Vocoded (NV) speech using magnetoencephal...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated two questions. One is to which degree sentence processing beyond single words is independent of the input modality (speech vs. reading). The second question is which parts of the network recruited by both modalities is sensitive to syntactic complexity. These questions were investigated by having more than 200 participants r...
Article
Recent research has established that cortical activity “tracks” the presentation rate of syntactic phrases in continuous speech, even though phrases are abstract units that do not have direct correlates in the acoustic signal. We investigated whether cortical tracking of phrase structures is modulated by the extent to which these structures composi...
Article
Listening to speech is difficult in noisy environments, and is even harder when the interfering noise consists of intelligible speech as compared to unintelligible sounds. This suggests that the competing linguistic information interferes with the neural processing of target speech. Interference could either arise from a degradation of the neural r...
Article
The ability to comprehend phrases is an essential integrative property of the brain. Here we evaluate the neural processes that enable the transition from single word processing to a minimal compositional scheme. Previous research has reported conflicting timing effects of composition, and disagreement persists with respect to inferior frontal and...
Article
Typical adults read remarkably quickly. Such fast reading is facilitated by brain processes that are sensitive to both word frequency and contextual constraints. It is debated as to whether these attributes have additive or interactive effects on language processing in the brain. We investigated this issue by analysing existing magnetoencephalograp...
Preprint
Full-text available
In a typical text, readers look much longer at some words than at others and fixate some words multiple times, while skipping others altogether. Historically, researchers explained this variation via low-level visual or oculomotor factors, but today it is primarily explained via cognitive factors, such as how well words can be predicted from contex...
Article
Full-text available
It has long been recognised that phrases and sentences are organised hierarchically, but many computational models of language treat them as sequences of words without computing constituent structure. Against this background, we conducted two experiments which showed that participants interpret ambiguous noun phrases, such as second blue ball, in t...
Article
Full-text available
The neurobiology of sentence production has been largely understudied compared to the neurobiology of sentence comprehension, due to difficulties with experimental control and motion-related artifacts in neuroimaging. We studied the neural response to constituents of increasing size and specifically focused on the similarities and differences in th...
Article
Full-text available
Linguistic labels exert a particularly strong top-down influence on perception. The potency of this influence has been ascribed to their ability to evoke category-diagnostic features of concepts. In doing this, they facilitate the formation of a perceptual template concordant with those features, effectively biasing perceptual activation towards th...
Preprint
Full-text available
Typical adults read remarkably quickly. Such fast reading is facilitated by brain processes that are sensitive to both word frequency and contextual constraints. It is debated as to whether these attributes have additive or interactive effects on language processing in the brain. We investigated this issue by analysing existing magnetoencephalograp...
Article
The present ERP study assessed whether grammatical aspect is used as a cue in online event comprehension, in particular when reading about events in which an object is visually changed. While perfective aspect cues holistic event representations, including an event's endpoint, progressive aspect highlights intermediate phases of an event. In a 2 ×...
Preprint
Full-text available
The ability to comprehend phrases is an essential integrative property of the brain. Here we evaluate the neural processes that enable the transition from single word processing to a minimal compositional scheme. Previous research has reported conflicting timing effects of composition, and disagreement persists with respect to inferior frontal and...
Preprint
Full-text available
During comprehension, the meaning extracted from serial language input can be described by hierarchical phrase structure. Whether our brains explicitly encode hierarchical structure during processing is, however, debated. In this study we recorded Magnetoencephalography (MEG) during reading of structurally ambiguous sentences to probe neural activi...
Article
Significance Sensory processing depends upon the integration of widely distributed neural assemblies. During every day listening, our ears receive different information (due to interaural time and amplitude differences) and it is known that both hemispheres extract different acoustic features. Nonetheless, acoustic features belonging to the same so...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to predict upcoming actions is a hallmark of cognition. It remains unclear, however, whether the predictive behaviour observed in controlled lab environments generalises to rich, everyday settings. In four virtual reality experiments, we tested whether a well-established marker of linguistic prediction (anticipatory eye movements) repli...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding spoken language requires transforming ambiguous stimulus streams into a hierarchy of increasingly abstract representations, ranging from speech sounds to meaning. It has been suggested that the brain uses predictive computations to guide the interpretation of incoming information. However, the exact role of prediction in language unde...
Preprint
Traditional experiments indicate that prediction is important for the efficient processing of incoming speech. In three virtual reality (VR) visual world paradigm experiments, we here tested whether such findings hold in naturalistic settings (Experiment 1) and provided novel insights into whether disfluencies in speech (repairs/hesitations) inform...
Article
Full-text available
Significance To understand an utterance, words have to be remembered and rapidly combined into an interpretation. How neurobiology supports this feat is currently unknown. One proposal that we investigate here is that information is stored and manipulated within single neurons. Depending on input history, neurons show different spike responses, and...
Article
Full-text available
Catecholamine (CA) function has been widely implicated in cognitive functions that are tied to the prefrontal cortex and striatal areas. The present study investigated the effects of methylphenidate, which is a CA agonist, on the electroencephalogram (EEG) response related to semantic processing using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized,...
Article
Full-text available
Bodily mimicry often makes the mimickee have more positive feelings about the mimicker. Yet, little is known about the causes of mimicry’s social effects. When people mimic each other’s bodily movements face to face, they can either adopt a mirrorwise perspective (moving in the same absolute direction) or an anatomical perspective (moving in the sa...
Article
Speakers and listeners usually interact in larger discourses than single words or even single sentences. The goal of the present study was to identify the neural bases reflecting how the mental representation of the situation denoted in a multi-sentence discourse (situation model) is constructed and shared between speakers and listeners. An fMRI st...
Article
Recent neuroimaging evidence suggests that the frequency of entrained oscillations in auditory cortices influences the perceived duration of speech segments, impacting word perception [Kösem, A., Bosker, H. R., Takashima, A., Meyer, A., Jensen, O., & Hagoort, P. Neural entrainment determines the words we hear. Current Biology, 28, 2867–2875, 2018]....
Article
Full-text available
This neuroimaging study investigated the neural infrastructure of sentence-level language production. We compared brain activation patterns, as measured with BOLD-fMRI, during production of sentences that differed in verb argument structures (intransitives, transitives, ditransitives) and the lexical status of the verb (known verbs or pseudoverbs)....
Article
The meaning of a sentence can be understood, whether presented in written or spoken form. Therefore it is highly probable that brain processes supporting language comprehension are at least partly independent of sensory modality. To identify where and when in the brain language processing is independent of sensory modality, we directly compared neu...
Article
In this contribution, the following four questions are discussed: (i) where is meaning?; (ii) what is meaning?; (iii) what is the meaning of mechanism?; (iv) what are the mechanisms of meaning? I will argue that meanings are in the head. Meanings have multiple facets, but minimally one needs to make a distinction between single word meanings (lexic...
Article
Full-text available
Visual context facilitates perception, but how this is neurally implemented remains unclear. One example of contextual facilitation is found in reading, where letters are more easily identified when embedded in a word. Bottom-up models explain this word advantage as a post-perceptual decision bias, while top-down models propose that word contexts e...
Article
Full-text available
Pre-stimulus alpha (8–12 Hz) and beta (16–20 Hz) oscillations have been frequently linked to the prediction of upcoming sensory input. Do these frequency bands serve as a neural marker of linguistic prediction as well? We hypothesized that if pre-stimulus alpha and beta oscillations index language predictions, their power should monotonically relat...
Preprint
Full-text available
Speakers and listeners usually interact in larger discourses than single words or even single sentences. The goal of the present study was to identify the neural bases reflecting how the mental representation of the situation denoted in a multi-sentence discourse (situation model) is constructed and shared between speakers and listeners. An fMRI st...
Article
Perceiving speech requires the integration of different speech cues, that is, formants. When the speech signal is split so that different cues are presented to the right and left ear (dichotic listening), comprehension requires the integration of binaural information. Based on prior electrophysiological evidence, we hypothesized that the integratio...
Preprint
Full-text available
Recent neuroimaging evidence suggests that the frequency of entrained oscillations in auditory cortices influences the perceived duration of speech segments, impacting word perception (Kosem et al. 2018). We further tested the causal influence of neural entrainment frequency during speech processing, by manipulating entrainment with continuous tran...
Article
In this Review, I propose a multiple-network view for the neurobiological basis of distinctly human language skills. A much more complex picture of interacting brain areas emerges than in the classical neurobiological model of language. This is because using language is more than single-word processing, and much goes on beyond the information given...
Article
Interactions between top-down and bottom-up information streams are integral to brain function but challenging to measure noninvasively. Laminar resolution, functional MRI (lfMRI) is sensitive to depth-dependent properties of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response, which can be potentially related to top-down and bottom-up signal contribu...
Article
A commonly held assumption in cognitive neuroscience is that, because measures of human brain function are closer to underlying biology than distal indices of behaviour/cognition, they hold more promise for uncovering genetic pathways. Supporting this view is an influential fMRI-based study of sentence reading/listening by Pinel and colleagues (201...
Preprint
Full-text available
Prediction in language has traditionally been studied using simple designs in which neural responses to expected and unexpected words are compared in a categorical fashion. However, these designs have been contested as being `prediction encouraging', potentially exaggerating the importance of prediction in language understanding. A few recent studi...
Poster
To communicate a complex issue or situation, speakers and listeners usually exchange information in the form of larger discourse, such as narratives or expository texts. Importantly, to understand the meaning of a larger discourse, information needs to be integrated over an extended period of time to build a coherent situation model, i.e., a mental...
Preprint
Full-text available
The meaning of a sentence can be understood, whether presented in written or spoken form. Therefore it is highly probable that brain processes supporting language comprehension are at least partly independent of sensory modality. To identify where and when in the brain language processing is independent of sensory modality, we directly compared neu...
Preprint
Full-text available
This neuroimaging study investigated the neural infrastructure of sentence-level language production. We compared brain activation patterns, as measured with BOLD-fMRI, during production of sentences which differed in verb argument structures (intransitives, transitives, ditransitives) and the lexical status of the verb (known verbs or pseudo-verbs...
Article
How does the human brain combine a finite number of words to form an infinite variety of sentences? According to the Memory, Unification and Control (MUC) model, sentence processing requires long-range feedback from the left inferior frontal cortex (LIFC) to left posterior temporal cortex (LPTC). Single word processing however may only require feed...
Preprint
Full-text available
Language processing often involves learning new words and how they relate to each other. These relations are realized through syntactic information connected to a word, e.g. a word can be verb or a noun, or both, like the word "run". In a behavioral and an fMRI task we showed that words and their syntactic properties, i.e. lexical items which were...
Article
Full-text available
A correction to this article has been published and is linked from the HTML version of this paper. The error has been fixed in the paper.
Article
Full-text available
This dataset, colloquially known as the Mother Of Unification Studies (MOUS) dataset, contains multimodal neuroimaging data that has been acquired from 204 healthy human subjects. The neuroimaging protocol consisted of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to derive information at high spatial resolution about brain anatomy and structural connections, a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Laminar resolution, functional magnetic resonance imaging (lfMRI) is a noninvasive technique with the potential to distinguish top-down and bottom-up signal contributions on the basis of laminar specific interactions between distal regions. Hitherto, lfMRI could not be demonstrated for either whole-brain distributed networks or for complex cognitiv...
Article
Full-text available
Speakers are influenced by the linguistic context: hearing one syntactic alternative leads to an increased chance that the speaker will repeat this structure in the subsequent utterance (i.e., syntactic priming, or structural persistence). Top-down influences, such as whether a conversation partner (or, interlocutor) is present, may modulate the de...
Preprint
Full-text available
This study investigated two questions. One is to which degree sentence processing beyond single words is independent of the input modality (speech vs. reading). The second question is which parts of the network recruited by both modalities is sensitive to syntactic complexity. These questions were investigated by having more than 200 participants r...
Article
Previous research on the effect of perturbed auditory feedback in speech production has focused on two types of responses. In the short term, speakers generate compensatory motor commands in response to unexpected perturbations. In the longer term, speakers adapt feedforward motor programs in response to feedback perturbations, in order to avoid fu...
Preprint
Full-text available
In language processing, an interpretation is computed incrementally within memory while utterances unfold in time. Here, we investigate the nature of this processing memory in a spiking network model of sentence comprehension. We show that the history dependence of neuronal responses endows circuits of biological neurons with adequate memory to ass...
Article
Previous research on the effect of perturbed auditory feedback in speech production has focused on two types of responses. In the short term, speakers generate compensatory motor commands in response to unexpected perturbations. In the longer term, speakers adapt feedforward motor programs in response to feedback perturbations, in order to avoid fu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Within the sensory domain, alpha/beta oscillations have been frequently linked to the prediction of upcoming sensory input. Here, we investigated whether oscillations at these frequency bands serve as a neural marker in the context of linguistic input prediction as well. Specifically, we hypothesized that if alpha/beta oscillations do index languag...
Article
Human language processing involves combinatorial operations that make human communication stand out in the animal kingdom. These operations rely on a dynamic interplay between the inferior frontal and the posterior temporal cortices. Using source reconstructed magnetoencephalography, we tracked language processing in the brain, in order to investig...
Article
Full-text available
Several studies have shown that communicative language production as compared to non-communicative language production recruits parts of the mentalizing or theory of mind network, yet the exact role of this network in communication remains underspecified. In this study, we therefore aimed to test under what conditions the mentalizing network contri...
Article
Full-text available
New linguistic information must be integrated into our existing language system. Using a novel experimental task that incorporates a syntactic priming paradigm into artificial language learning, we investigated how new grammatical regularities and words are learned. This innovation allowed us to control the language input the learner received, whil...
Article
Low-frequency neural entrainment to rhythmic input has been hypothesized as a canonical mechanism that shapes sensory perception in time. Neural entrainment is deemed particularly relevant for speech analysis, as it would contribute to the extraction of discrete linguistic elements from continuous acoustic signals. However, its causal influence in...
Preprint
Full-text available
The ability to predict upcoming actions is a characteristic hallmark of cognition and therefore not surprisingly a central topic in cognitive science. It remains unclear, however, whether the predictive behaviour commonly observed in strictly controlled lab environments generalizes to rich, everyday settings. In four virtual reality experiments, we...
Preprint
Full-text available
Listening to speech is difficult in noisy environments, and is even harder when the interfering noise consists of intelligible speech as compared to non-intelligible sounds. This suggests that the ignored speech is not fully ignored, and that competing linguistic information interferes with the neural processing of target speech. We tested this hyp...