Pedro M. Sardoy's research while affiliated with Universidad de Buenos Aires and other places

Publications (15)

Article
The southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula is one of the primary soybean pests and causes significant economic losses around the world. In spite of the high proteases inhibitor (PI) levels, N. viridula can feed on developing seeds of field-grown soybean and reduce crop yields. Although the PI-induced responses have been extensively investigated...
Article
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The Southern green stinkbug (N. viridula) feeds on developing soybean seeds in spite of their strong defenses against herbivory, making this pest one of the most harmful to soybean crops. To test the hypothesis that midgut bacterial community allows stinkbugs to tolerate chemical defenses of soybean developing seeds, we identified and characterized...
Data
Geographical placement of collecting sites. (PDF)
Data
(a) Cysteine protease activity of N. viridula V1-V4 midgut ventricles. Statistical differences are denoted by different letters. (b) Distribution of ARISA detected bacteria among N. viridula V1-V4 midgut ventricles. Bacterial ITS fragments appear as blue peaks and LIZ 1200 weight standard fragments appear as yellow peaks. On a black square are 748...
Data
Bacterial communities in the midgut of Nezara viridula associated to the insects hosts. (PDF)
Data
Bacteria isolated in this work and those used to build phylogenetic trees of Yokenella. (PDF)
Data
Bacteria isolated in this work and those used to build phylogenetic trees of Enterococcus sp. (PDF)
Data
Map of Argentina (a) and a zoom of central east Argentina (b) were 26 collecting events were performed during 2012–2014. Nezara viridula adults were handpicked from secondary hosts (light grey spots), Soybean (dark grey spots) or from under de bark of Eucalyptus trees (black spots). (PDF)
Article
Background: Southern green stink bugs (Nezara viridula) invade field-grown soybean crops, where they feed on developing seeds and inject phytotoxic saliva that causes yield reduction. Although leaf responses to herbivory are well studied, no information is available about the regulation of defenses in seeds. Results: This study demonstrated that...

Citations

... Cysteine protease activity was determined on the supernatant as described in previous studies, using the specific substrate p-Glu-Phe-Leu-pNA (Sigma, St Louis, MO, USA; as explained in S7). 42 Membrane lipid peroxidation was analyzed through thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) 43 (as explained in the Methods S8). TBARS are formed as a byproduct of lipid peroxidation. ...
... Whereas some insects can avoid plant chemical defenses by different behavioral and biochemical mechanisms, [5][6][7] recently laboratory in vitro experiments have suggested that soybean proteases inhibitors can be deactivated by N. viridula's gut microbiota, such as the enterobacteria Yokenella sp. 8 Some specific gut bacteria enable insects to feed on poor diets or digest recalcitrant compounds and increase insect performance. 9,10 Moreover, shifts on bacterial gut communities have allowed contemporary adaptation of insects to overcome new technologies of pest control. ...
... 1,2 These stink bugs feed on developing soybean seeds overcoming plant induced defenses, such as cysteine proteases inhibitors and isoflavonoids. 3,4 Although stink bug attack decreases soybean crop yields, there is still no clear evidence on the mechanisms underlying N. viridula resistance to soybean allelochemicals. Whereas some insects can avoid plant chemical defenses by different behavioral and biochemical mechanisms, [5][6][7] recently laboratory in vitro experiments have suggested that soybean proteases inhibitors can be deactivated by N. viridula's gut microbiota, such as the enterobacteria Yokenella sp. 8 Some specific gut bacteria enable insects to feed on poor diets or digest recalcitrant compounds and increase insect performance. ...