Pedro J. S. Vieira de Oliveira's scientific contributions

Publications (7)

Article
This paper discusses the role of design and material practices on the weaponization of quietness through the deployment of sound bombs by the Military Police of São Paulo, Brazil. Probing the contradiction of using a device that produces loudness to enforce silence laws, I offer an account of how designed artifacts and techniques can be instrumenta...
Article
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This roundtable was conducted by the eight founding members of Decolonising Design Group in October 2017, using an online messaging platform. Each member approached design and decoloniality from different yet interrelating viewpoints, by threading their individual arguments with the preceding ones. The piece thus offers and travels through a variet...
Article
How can the ideas of timelessness and anachronism contribute to the decolonization of design practices in Latin America?
Article
This article discusses how Sonic Fictiona concept developed by cultural theorist Kodwo Eshuncan be regarded as a cogent mechanism with which to develop Speculative and Critical Design (SCD) projects, using subjects of sound, music, and listening as their driving force. Through a dissection of the base premises of sonic fictions, this article aims t...
Article
One of the core characteristics of speculative design projects is the way they can be easily confused with reality. By maintaining a close connection with the mundane, these fictions often pose provocative questions shaped as uncanny scenarios that weave rather dystopian encounters with possible futures. However, where does one trace the line betwe...

Citations

... This principle builds on the history of social design as a critique of the mainstream and proposes social design as an ongoing critical practice (Mazé, 2008). This means understanding the problematic histories of both the mainstream and social design itself, recognizing the epistemic regimes within which they have arisen and excavating the complex power dynamics inherent in designing and designs (Abdulla et al., 2019;Schultz et al., 2018). ...
... This research concurs with some design scholars' concerns with the growing hegemonic paradigm of innovation in the Global South [7][8][9][10]; therefore, discussions on inclusive innovation cannot be separated from the debates within the decolonising design landscape. The works of these decolonial design scholars try to re-orient design studies and move away from the further practise of colonialism and centralising trends and instead promotes a plurality of practices and discourses [11][12]. ...
... Systems thinking may address some of these attributes, but social and political positionality must also be acknowledged and evaluated (White, 2018;Boehnert et al., 2018;Wallace, 2019). As the decolonizing design movement has noted, design has histories of upholding symbolic violence and cultural oppressions (Boehnert & Onafuwa, 2016;Schultz et al., 2018). Thus, the histories of design, as well as that of the localized problem, must be understood through the lenses of structural oppression. ...
... Originally coined to describe the socio-political, cultural, and economic processes following the undoing of colonial rule, the interest to decolonise has moved beyond the dismantling of the colonial empires to include many spheres of life. In fact, in recent years the encouragements to 'decolonise' have embraced many fields and included, among others, the necessity to repatriate indigenous land and life (Boveda and Bhattacharya 2019;Tuck and Wayne Yang 2012), critically reflect on existing practices and epistemologies (Ali 2014;Datta 2018;Hajibayova and Buente 2016;Torretta and Reitsma 2019;Zavala 2013), embrace the local processes ( de Martins and de Oliveira 2016;Dourish and Mainwaring 2012;Walters and Simoni 2009), strengthen indigenous theory and practice (Du 2017;Mawere and van Stam 2015;, and dismantle the colonial status quo (Bidwell 2016;Boveda and Bhattacharya 2019;Keyes et al. 2019;Le Grange 2016). ...
... Although they speak about a futuristic scenario, design fiction is materialized in the present, reflecting present values, intentions, and ideologies (Gonzatto et al., 2013). Design scholars concerned with the domestication of the future have tried to counter this strategy in the present by adopting a decolonial perspective over speculative design (Vieira de Oliveira, 2016; Martins & Vieira de Oliveira, 2016;Schultz, 2018). In their effort, they implicitly raised a challenge for underdeveloped interaction design: how to raise designers' consciousness of oppressed historicity? ...
... Patterns across place and time are, of course, a major part of popular fiction, especially in stories explicitly about time-travel whether to the past or future, intentional or accidental, or travel to far-away or fantastical places. From Francis Godwin's The Man in the Moone (1638 [24]) in which a Spanish man builds a flying machine by harnessing some very powerful swans, and is given magical stones including an anti-gravity material by inhabitants of the Moon (explorerd further in Agnes Meyer-Brandis's The Moon Goose Colony [25]), to John Titor (2000 [26]) who appeared on various message boards and forums claiming to be from 2036 and seeking to recover a 1970s IBM 5100 computer to tackle legacy software exhibiting the UNIX Year 2038 problem, technologies are often central to these kinds of stories. Would H.G. Wells's The Time Machine (1895) have been so influential without the machine itself being described? ...