Paul Dwyer's research while affiliated with The University of Sydney and other places

Publications (9)

Article
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This paper offers a multimodal perspective on how identities are performed and negotiated in discourse, concentrating on the interaction of language and body language within a particular genre, Youth Justice Conferencing. These conferences operate as a diversionary form of sentencing in the juvenile justice system of New South Wales, Australia. Typ...
Article
Full-text available
Youth justice conferencing is one of a number of programs which have been introduced into western legal systems in recent years, typically under the banner of a ‘restorative justice’ reform movement. These conferences bring young people (who have admitted their guilt), victims and other parties into a face-to-face meeting in which the impact of the...

Citations

... Tables 2 to 4 present a simplified version of the kind of exchange structure analysis we have adopted in our work in order to keep track of both regulative and integrative moves in conferencing discourse (for more detailed analysis and explanation of notation see Martin, Zappavigna and Dwyer 2009b). This approach to exchange analysis considers dialogue in terms of what is being negotiated by speakers, that is, whether they are initiating or responding to information or knowledge (K) (for instance, asking what the time is), or whether they are offering or demanding action (A) (for instance, asking for a drink of water) (Martin and Rose 2007). ...
... We undertake the analysis of body language presented here not only because the meanings negotiated in a conference cannot be fully interpreted on the basis of one modality alone, but because body language gives us an important insight into the bonding process flagged by Knight (2010). The model of body language that we have used in this study arose out of previous work investigating the co-patterning of gesture and phonological structure, viewed as sibling systems on language's expression plane (Zappavigna et al. 2009). Analysis of body language is a new region in SFL-based multimodal discourse analysis, although it is relatively well established in other disciplines such as anthropology and cognitive science (Efron 1941;Morris 1979;McNeill 1992;Goldin-Meadow and Singer 2003;Kendon 2004). ...
... Conferences open with a genre we refer to as the socio-legal framing, whose overall function is to establish agreement with respect to the conduct of the macro-genre. Based on analysis of the eight conferences we transcribed and considered in detail, we propose the following stages for this genre -along with a brief characterisation of their function Dwyer 2007a, 2009;Zappavigna, Dwyer and Martin 2015 Stages typically unfold in the sequence listed above, although both the Goal Affirmation and Protocol Setting stages may occur more than once, and are more flexible than other stages in terms of where they appear. We will not go into the details and challenges of formalising a structural representation of this staging here (for further discussion, see Zappavigna and Martin in press). ...
... Also, we looked back to Martin, Zappavigna, and Dwyer's work on identity in adolescent identity in youth justice conferencing (Zappavigna et al., 2008;Zappavigna & Martin, 2018) for our notion of 'attitudinal disposition' (even though this term was not used in this literature). These scholars analysed the language of young offenders who were taking part in Australia's youth justice conferences-which function as a restorative justice alternative to courtroombased retributive justice. ...
... This study examines the role and function of evaluation in the process of negotiating voice or the views of writers (stance), especially novice writers, in a scientific community (shared community). In the context of legal discourse, evaluation studies are still rarely conducted, with the exception of a handful of studies conducted by Korner (2000), Martin et al. (2010), and Shi (2018). While it is the case that Copyright © 2021, authors, e-ISSN: 2502-6747, p-ISSN: 2301-9468 those researchers investigated the topic of evaluation in legal discourse, none of them undertook their studies in the Indonesian context. ...
... , a pioneer in the sociolinguistic study of legal texts, acknowledges its influence on genre analysis while calling for greater clarity in its theorisation of genre and register. Martin [9], the leading figure in the Sydney School of SFG since the demise of Halliday, has applied it to the analysis of justice forums. In this section there will be a broad description of the 2016 text based on SFG's attention to three aspects of communication: the Ideational metafunction, which investigates how words and structures (lexicogrammar) represent the propositional content of a text and the interactions among human and non-human phenomena; the Interpersonal metafunction, which explores how relationships between writers and readers (or speakers and listeners) are constructed; and the Textual metafunction, which examines how texts are organised into cohesive discourses. ...
... Bazerman, 1988Bazerman, , 1994Freedman, 1993Freedman, , 1999Freedman & Adam, 1996), and Australian Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL) (e.g. Christie, 1991aChristie, , 1991bChristie & Martin, 1997;Martin, 1992Martin, , 2006Martin, , 2009Martin & Rose, 2008;Martin, Zappavigna, & Dwyer, 2007;Rose, 2006)-expand genre theories in different directions. However, common to those theories of genre was the notion of staging communication with the view to achieve a social purpose. ...