Patrick Tinsley's research while affiliated with Suffolk University and other places

Publications (3)

Article
While most people might answer the question in the affirmative, such a law ends up punishing the victim instead of the kidnapper. Drawing from libertarian philosophy it is shown that such laws also fail to reduce kidnapping for profit and thus are not only offensive to the nature of justice but cannot achieve the aim for which they were originally...

Citations

... Despite the growing international consensus on similar measures in the case of terrorist-related kidnapping, these policies are highly controversial. As noted by Block and Tinsley (2008), "one may as well enact legislation forbidding a mugger's victim from responding "life" to the threat of "your money or your life."" To some extent such measures end up punishing the victim rather than the criminal, and, in any event, most people would see it as an unacceptable restriction of personal liberty. ...
... According to the authors, an action is an act performed due to a personal decision made with a conscious mind. In contrast, behaviour is unconsciously influenced by social factors (Jensen and Schnack 2006;Kinsella and Tinsley 2004). Drawing on the Transtheoretical Model (Prochaska, DiClemente, and Norcross 1992), this paper suggests that an action could also influenced by social factors and vice versa. ...