Patricia A. Adler's research while affiliated with University of Colorado and other places

Publications (97)

Chapter
It has been nearly two decades since Sumner (1994) rang the death knell for the sociology of deviance. Several notable scholars, in particular, have debated the vibrancy of the field — from the liveliness of its empirical and theoretical contributions to its interest to students, scholars and publishers (Ben-Yehuda, 1990, 1994, 2006; Best, 2004a, 2...
Article
Previous models of therapeutic treatment for self-injury have been focused on individualistic psycho-medical approaches that isolate and stigmatize people who cut, burn, and otherwise self-harm. The rise of cyber communities of self-injury, beginning in the early 2000s but evolving dramatically over the first decade of the twenty-first century, has...
Article
Drawing on careers spanning over 35 years in the field of ethnography, we reflect on the research in which we’ve engaged and how the practice and epistemology of ethnography has evolved over this period. We begin by addressing the problematic nature of ethical issues in conducting qualitative research, highlighting the non-uniform nature of standar...
Article
Cyber communities have facilitated new forms of identity and self-regulation for people engaging in self-harm practices. The authors explore the online worlds of self-injurers and how they offer ways for people to develop new kinds of social order.
Article
Keywords Drawing on careers spanning over 35 years in the field of ethnography, we re-flect on the research in which we've engaged and how the practice and episte-mology of ethnography has evolved over this period. We begin by addressing the problematic nature of ethical issues in conducting qualitative research, highlighting the non-uniform nature...
Article
Conflicting stereotypes have confused the public about the motivations, ideology, and organization underlying soft drug dealing. This field study integrates new and existing images of criminality and commitment to provide insight into the complex and subterranean dealing world.
Article
We explore how self-injurers, a group of deviants who primarily were loners, now use the Internet to form subcultural and collegial relations. Drawing on virtual participant-observation in cyber self-injury groups, over eighty face-to-face and telephone in-depth interviews, and over ten thousand e-mail postings to groups and bulletin boards, we des...
Article
Influenced by the new literary movement and postmodernism, in the 1990s sociologists began to reflexively examine their writings as texts, looking critically at the way they shape reality and articulate their descriptions and conceptualizations. Advancing this thread, in our presidential address we offer an overarching analysis of ethnographic writ...
Article
This article offers a glimpse into the relatively hidden practice of self-injury: cutting, burning, branding, and bone breaking. Drawing on eighty in-depth interviews, Web site postings, e-mail communications, and Internet groups, we challenge the psychomedical depiction of this phenomenon and discuss ways that the contemporary sociological practic...
Article
Debate has recently become lively about the state of the sociology of deviance in our discipline. While some have condemned it as stale, lacking in new theoretical advances, we disagree with this assessment. We assert, rather, that the field of deviance offers unparalleled insight into society, particularly in current times. Deviance thrives in Ame...
Article
In this paper we examine the social organization of people who deliberately destroy or damage their own body tissue without suicidal intent. Best and Luckenbill (19828. Best Joel and David F. Luckenbill . 1982 . Organizing Deviance . Englewood Cliffs , NJ : Prentice Hall . View all references) have proposed two typologies of deviance performed by...
Article
The pathway through graduate school is challenging and difficult. Nearly everyone, at one point or another, confronts the existential question of whether they want to drop out or to continue. Several challenges emerge as key to graduate students’ success in progressing through their programs. p]The first is moving from the secure but sometimes suff...
Article
This article identifies and describes a phenomenon that has arisen over the course of the last generation: an institutionalized “afterschool” period marked by children's involvement in adult-organized and -supervised activities. We trace the historical development of this period and examine its socializing influences on children. Children experienc...
Article
Resorts have become important to American society and its economy; one in eight Americans is now employed by the tourism industry. Yet despite the ubiquity of hotels, little has been written about those who labor there. Drawing on eight years of participant observation and in-depth interviews, the renowned ethnographers Patricia A. Adler and Peter...
Article
Everyday life sociology comprises a broad spectrum of micro perspectives: symbolic interactionism, dramaturgy, phenomenology, ethnomethodology, and existential sociology. We discuss the underlying themes that bind these diverse subfields into a unified approach to the study of social interaction. We outline the historical development of everyday li...
Article
Firsthand reports from the field comprise some of the most valuable work in the social sciences. But findings are often controversial. Understanding how fieldwork is carried out can help readers assess ethnographic research.
Article
Seasonality, a chronic problem in the resort industry, is addressed in this seven-year participant observation and in-depth interview study of five Hawaiian resorts contiguously arrayed along a sandy beachfront strip. In order to operate profitably, these organizations must keep their labor costs trimmed as they move through annual cyclical fluctua...
Article
This article examines off-time labor in a resort hotel, drawing on 6 years of participant observation and in-depth interviews. Operating around the clock, this resort, like others, offers the temporal freedom of continuous openness, flexibility, and convenience to guests by tethering employees to an incessant time clock, forcing a good proportion t...
Article
The occupational community of resort workers offers a glimpse into the global post-modern workforce: individuals who relocate around the world, impelled by their career aspirations or their search for the intense experience of the beauty, exotic nature, and extreme recreation in various international destinations. These people have abandoned the co...
Article
Sociological studies of the relationship between work and leisure have not yet focused on the arena where the two are juxtaposed most significantly: hospitality workers who manufacture resort leisure. In this article, based on four years of participant observation and in-depth interviewing, we examine four types of resort workers—new immigrants, lo...
Article
While there is an expanding literature of qualitative studies with children, there is relatively little that examines the actual fieldwork process with them. This book looks at fieldwork with children from a number of perspectives, and helps to address the needs of researchers working with children. Robyn M Holmes overviews the study of children in...
Article
Peer Power explodes existing myths about children's friendships, power and popularity, and the gender chasm between elementary school boys and girls. Based on 8 years of intensive insider participant observation in their own children's community, the authors discuss the vital components in the lives of preadolescents: popularity, friendships, cliqu...
Article
The occupational community of resort workers offers a glimpse into the global postmodern workforce: individuals who relocate around the world, impelled by their career aspirations or their search for the intense experience of the beauty, exotic nature, and extreme recreation in various international destinations. These people have abandoned the con...
Article
This article focuses on one of the most critical features of elementary school students' social lives: their peer friendship groups. Within each grade, and separated by gender, a hierarchy of friendship groups is stratified according to the dimension of status and popularity. This ranges from the popular clique at the top, to the wannabes who hang...
Article
Several roles for conducting ethnographic research with children have been discussed, but one that has been omitted is the parent-as-researcher. In this paper, we describe some of the methodological advantages and disadvantages of the longitudinal ethnography of preadolescent children we conducted in our community using this methodological approach...
Article
This article was written for scholars who do not engage in qualitative research and/or who are not familiar with its methods and epistemologies. It focuses on naturalistic qualitative research with families. An overview of the goals and procedures of qualitative research is first presented. This is followed by a discussion of the linkages between e...
Article
A critical structural form organizing the social arrangement of children's lives is the clique. This primary group colors the character of children's preadolescent years and shapes their socialization to adult life. In this paper we draw on longitudinal participant observation and on depth interviews with advanced elementary-school children to expl...
Article
In concluding our term as editors, we review the submissions we have received over the last eight years and offer some insight into recent demographic trends in the field of ethnography, including who is conducting research, how they are doing it, and where they are focusing their attention. We compare these findings to previous speculations and as...
Article
This article draws on data gathered through participant observation with preadolescent children in and outside elementary schools to focus on the role of popularity in gender socialization. Within their gendered peer subcultures, boys and girls constructed idealized images of masculinity and femininity on which they modeled their behavior. These im...
Article
Part 1 Early childhood care: early intervention - a field moving toward a sociological perspective, Rosalyn Benjamin Darling and Jon Darling non-parental child care environments - differences in preschool cognitive skills by type of care, Marlena Studer quality of centre care and cognitive outcomes - differences by family income, Marlena Studer par...
Article
A chronological account of the socialization experiences of college basketball players from their recruitment and entry into university through the termination of their college playing careers is presented in this book. After a prologue which describes the methodological techniques used in the 10-year study, chapter 1 presents an overview of the st...
Article
This is a study of changes in the selves of college athletes that result from their entry into a world of celebrity and glory. Drawing of five years of participant-observation research with a college basketball team, we discuss athletes' experiences with fame. They undergo concomitant processes of self-aggrandizement and self-diminishment whereby s...
Article
In this paper we examine a type of organizational loyalty, intense loyalty, that is more profound than the type of organizational loyalty traditionally portrayed as a rather mild attachment of individuals to a group, based on their satisfaction with their economic rewards, authority relations, or occupational self-fulfillment. Using data gathered o...
Article
Identity theorists have proposed several variables as influencing the salience of an individual's role. Based upon four years of participant observation with a major college basketball team, we examine the changing salience of athletes' athletic, social, and especially academic roles. Their experiences with role conflict and socialization affirm pr...
Article
This study examines the relationship between athletic participation and academic performance among athletes involved in big-time college sports. Drawing on four years of participant observation of a major college basketball program, we trace athletes' involvement in academics throughout their college careers. We show that, contrary to popular belie...
Article
Many locations, modes, and agents of socialization have been examined by sociologists, but there is one that remains conceptually unexplored: the carpool. Carpool socialization falls within the overlapping influence of three primary socializing agents: the peer group, the family, and the school. We investigate the types of interaction occurring bot...
Article
This is the first study of drug trafficking in the United States to penetrate the upper eschelons of the marijuana and cocaine business—the smugglers and their primary dealers. We spent six years observing and interviewing these traffickers and their associates in southwestern California and examining their typical career paths. We show how drug tr...
Article
This is a study about competing subcultures in conflict over preferred definitions of social order. With recent heavy migration producing a demographic shift in the population, two polarized groups have arisen in the state of Oklahoma. The evolving struggle over the control of alcohol legislation (public drinking and selling liquor by the drink are...
Article
The relatively new practice of tinydopers—marijuana smoking by children between the ages of 0–8 years—is introduced and analyzed. The children are examined through a descriptive ethnography, followed by more general conclusions about the developmental process itself. We then look at the varied range of approaches parents take toward marijuana and t...

Citations

... The sample size and population of this study are six graduates who work as chefs in the hospitality industry and six graduates who work in various job types in multiple sectors. According to Adler and Adler (2012), 12 respondents are the appropriate number of samples for a qualitative investigation on issues involving college graduates. This study employed a nonprobability sampling method, particularly judgment sampling and snowball sampling, to select the element in the sample. ...
... In general, STEM athlete participants appeared segregated within the athletic community despite athletic advisors asking them to engage in STEM opportunities and build relationships with academic and faculty advisors whom they considered STEM experts. This finding is consistent with a body of research that describes athletes as highly isolated from the rest of the campus community (e.g., Adler & Adler, 1991;Huml et al., 2014;Mark & Alexander, 2019;NCAA, 2016;Rubin & Moses, 2017). In particular, as noted by Huml et al. (2014), athlete-only academic centers isolate athletes and hinder their ability to connect with faculty members. ...
... Furthermore, the effectiveness of these practices for protecting research participants is unknown (Abbott & Grady, 2011). Sociologists have echoed these frustrations, decrying IRB overreach and the resulting limitations on research (Adler & Adler, 2016;Irvine, 2012;Levine, 2001). ...
... For example, will it be possible to develop the kind of trusting relationships that are important? Due to ethical concerns, covert research is rarely permitted -but even if it is, the stressful nature of such work makes it unsuitable for inexperienced researchers (Goodall, 1989). ...
... While Adriaanse (2015) studied gender diversity in sport governance globally and examined the gender ratio on boards of National Sport Organisations in 45 countries, others focused on the issue of underrepresentation of women on sport boards in a concrete country or sport movement, such as Australia (e.g. McKay 1992McKay , 1997Sibson 2010), Canada (Shaw -Slack 2002;Inglis 1997), Germany (Pfister -Radtke 2009), the Netherlands (e.g. Claringbould -Knoppers 2008, New Zealand (Shaw 2006;Cameron 1996), Norway (Fasting 2000;Hovden, 2010;Skirstad 2009), the UK (e.g. ...
... Like the researcher who leaves the field "personally acquainted" (Geertz, 1988, p. 144), so must the readers leave the text. Data, or-more helpfully-empirical material of the sort Geertz is referring to implies a level of involvement put forth by some of the early Chicago ethnographers: to observe human group life in situ (Blumer, 1969;Hughes, 1971;Adler and Adler, 1987). Qualities of intense familiarity with the "mundane things people are actually doing", say Becker (1991, p. 190), may only be understood and conveyed by interacting directly and naturalistically (Denzin, 1989). ...
... In describing how drug dealers get involved in drug business, Adler and Adler (1980) claim that one of the key attractions serving to lure individuals into this world is the promise of prestige and power. Lower level distributors enjoy the rewards of keeping their friends supplied with drugs, getting free drugs for themselves and attaining the ego gratification of completing successful business transactions. ...
... These notes, both observational and interview, were reviewed, and discussions took place with my interpreter for clarity and accuracy as soon as possible following each interview. As interview locations were selected by participants and full 4 There is ongoing debate as to what constitutes participant observation (Adler and Adler 1987); here, I define it similar to van Uhm (2016), in that I participated in the everyday lives of poachers, seeking to disrupt their routines as little as possible, but did not actively participate in poaching. I did, however, see the aftermath of poaching. ...
... He gigged intensively all through high school and college, intermittently through medical school, and occasionally through internship and residency (all in New York City). Moments of JY's experiences as a summer hotel bandleader at age 18 are depicted in "Catskill Culture" by sociologist Phil Brown (in which JY's quartet is dubbed "the Barry Scheinberg Orchestra") [6]. Contributing to the dicta appearing below, in these capacities, JY's major developmental roles included seeing to recruitment (assessing for sufficient talent and group compatibility), retention (lives happen), funding (seeking and securing gigs for the band and negotiating fees with employers), payroll (assuring that the band was paid and money equitably distributed), logistics (assuring that everyone owned similarly colored tuxedo jackets, cumberbunds, and music stands, that parents could provide transportation, or that at least one band-member had a working vehicle and enough gas to get the group to and from gigs), mediation (personalities rule group dynamics), and maintenance of certification (making sure that everyone's union dues were paid and that band members were up on the latest music). ...
... Despite MDMA's reputation as a being culturally accepted as a 'love drug' rather than typically associated with sexual enhancement (Beck & Rosenbaum, 1994), interestingly, there was meaningful evidence of our participants experiencing increased sexual desire or 'horniness' whilst combining sex and MDMA. One participant explained that sex on MDMA, in her words, made her 'obsessed' with sex: I can't actually take MDMA because I get too horny on it. ...