P. T. Arena's research while affiliated with Nova Southeastern University and other places

Publications (7)

Chapter
Full-text available
Derelict ships are commonly deployed as artificial reefs in the United States, mainly for recreational fishers and divers. Despite their popularity, few studies have rigorously examined fish assemblages on these structures and compared them to natural reefs. Six vessel-reefs off the coast of southeast Florida were censused quarterly (two ships per...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Grunts (Haemulidae) are important fisheries species and represent a major component of reef fish communities in the Greater Caribbean region. To date, little is known about their recruitment patterns. Data from more than 2000 visual fish counts from multiple natural and artificial reef studies in Broward County, Florida, over a seven-year period, w...

Citations

... Juvenile haemulid distribution has been extensively studied in Broward County, Florida Jordan et al., 2010). They exhibit both a pelagic larval stage and demersal juvenile and adult stage, and are highly abundant during the summer months (McFarland et al., 1985;Jordan et al., 2004). It is the transitional phase between their pelagic and reefal life stages, the post-settlement phase (<2 cm), in which the greatest difference in abundance is demonstrated when comparing NHB and mitigation boulder transects ( Table 1). ...
... Similar patterns were recorded from nearshore hardbottom in Fort Lauderdale Baron et al. 2004). Most species of grunts are not encountered as newly settled stages in midshelf or deeper reef habitats (e.g., Lindeman et al. 1998;Jordan et al. 2004). Some species use characteristic settlement microhabitats in which they aggregate while transforming from epibenthic larvae into demersal juvenile stages (Chap. ...
... 2.78 [15.54] Greater soapfish Rypticus saponaceus GC 0.47 2.10 0.76 Bigeyes Priacanthidae Bigeye Priacanthus arenatus GC 0.19 Short bigeye Pristigenys alta GC 0.51 [0.13] 3.89 Cardinalfish Apogonidae Bigtooth cardinalfish Apogon affinis PL 0.61 Twospot cardinalfish Apogon pseudomaculatus PL 0.30 0.13 Tilefish Malacanthidae Blueline tilefish Caulolatilus microps GC 0.62 Sand tilefish Malacanthus plumieri GC 0.38 Cobias Rachycentridae Cobia Rachycentron canadum GC 0.47 2.41 Remoras Echeneididae Sharksucker Echeneis naucrates GC 0.15 Jacks Carangidae Bar jack Carangoides ruber GC 1.06 2.52 4.70 0.13 Blue runner Caranx crysos GC 0.14 0.90 Amberjack Seriola dumerili GC 8.47 3.64 2.73 0.77 9.81 1.24 Almaco jack Seriola rivoliana PI 14.47 3.50 4.24 0.51 [0.51] 1.48 Permit Trachinotus falcatus BC 0.15 Snappers Lutjanidae Black snapper Apsilus dentatus GC 0.14 Mutton snapper Lutjanus analis GC 0.12 0.42 0.15 Blackfin snapper Lutjanus buccanella GC 1.65 9.53 5.30 Lane snapper Lutjanus synagris GC 9.39 Gray snapper Lutjanus griseus GC 28.59 21.17 8.94 Cubera snapper Lutjanus cyanopterus GC 0.24 0.42 Mahogony snapper Lutjanus mahogoni GC 0.13 Vermilion snapper Rhomboplites aurorubens GC 95.88 36.52 8.52 3.42 Grunts Haemulidae Black margate Anisotremus surinamensis GC 0.82 2.24 1.97 Porkfish Anisotremus virginicus BC 2.94 0.70 0.30 Mesophotic reef fish community 113 Arena et al., 2004 ...
... Artificial reefs can host cryptic demersal fish, such as blennies and gobies, as well as bottomassociated reef fish from a variety of trophic groups, including invertivores and herbivores (Cresson, Ruitton, Ourgaud, & Harmelin-Vivien, 2014;Paxton, Newton, et al., 2020). These structures can also support high concentrations of pelagic fishes, including planktivores (Arena et al., 2007;Champion et al., 2015) and piscivores (Ajemian et al., 2015;Paxton, Newton, et al., 2020). And, similar to energy infrastructure, artificial reefs form habitat for large predators (Figure 1d), like sand tiger sharks (Carcharias taurus), which have been observed to exhibit site fidelity to artificial reefs (Paxton, Blair, et al., 2019), as well as top predators, including white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) (A. ...
... Reef balls© in the Caribbean (Hylkema et al., 2020) and in estuarine bays in Australia (Mills et al., 2017;Folpp et al., 2020) had a higher fish abundance and species richness than the surrounding soft sediment habitat. Fish densities and biomass on wrecks were similar (Fowler and Booth 2012) or even higher (Arena et al., 2007) tto those on nearby natural reefs. Hylkema et al. (2020) and Abelson and Shlesinger (2002) reported high fish densities and fish species richness for artificial reefs made from natural rock piles in the Caribbean and Red Sea, respectively. ...