P. J. Chapman's scientific contributions

Publications (4)

Article
The conventional deposition of mine tailings as a slurry in seepage, with the potential to contaminate surface and ground waters, particularly during deposition, and possibly post-closure. In a dry climate, tailings deposition can be cycled to largely evaporate excess water, and on closure the tailings may remain desiccated to the extent that incid...
Article
The conventional deposition of potentially acid forming sulfidic mine tailings as a slurry results in seepage, with the potential to contaminate surface and ground waters, particularly during deposition, and possibly post-closure. In a dry climate, tailings deposition can be cycled to largely evaporate excess water, and on closure the tailings may...

Citations

... Under a hydraulic gradient of unity, these tailings under field conditions would pass water at a rate of about 10 -10 m/s (6 to 60 mm/year), not 10 -16 m/s as is implied by the laboratory-derived SWCC data. Chapman et al. (2008) described a field trial involving saline, Cosmos nickel sulfide tailings in Western Australia. In order to track the water cycle of the tailings deposition and desiccation cycles, towers fabricated from 25 mm box section were installed in advance of tailings deposition, on which piezometers, and series of 16 pairs of matric suction and Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) volumetric water content sensors were fixed at 300 mm centres (Figures 28 and 29). Figure 30 shows the Cosmos tailings deposition and desiccation stages over a number of months, to a total height of about 4 m. Figure 31 shows the response of the matric suction sensors as they were progressively inundated by tailings, which were allowed to desiccate between deposition cycles. ...
... Under a hydraulic gradient of unity, these tailings under field conditions would pass water at a rate of about 10 -10 m/s (6 to 60 mm/year), not 10 -16 m/s as is implied by the laboratory-derived SWCC data. Chapman et al. (2008) described a field trial involving saline, Cosmos nickel sulfide tailings in Western Australia. In order to track the water cycle of the tailings deposition and desiccation cycles, towers fabricated from 25 mm box section were installed in advance of tailings deposition, on which piezometers, and series of 16 pairs of matric suction and Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) volumetric water content sensors were fixed at 300 mm centres (Figures 28 and 29). Figure 30 shows the Cosmos tailings deposition and desiccation stages over a number of months, to a total height of about 4 m. Figure 31 shows the response of the matric suction sensors as they were progressively inundated by tailings, which were allowed to desiccate between deposition cycles. ...