Oliver John Kennedy's research while affiliated with The University of Manchester and other places

Publications (18)

Article
Background β-adrenergic receptors are upregulated in melanoma cells and contribute to an immunosuppressive, pro-tumorigenic microenvironment. This study investigated the prognostic and predictive value of β-adrenoreceptor blockade by β-blockers in the EORTC1325/KEYNOTE-054 randomised controlled trial. Methods Patients with resected stage IIIA, III...
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Background Chronic liver disease (CLD) is a growing cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly in low to middle-income countries with high disease burden and limited treatment availability. Coffee consumption has been linked with lower rates of CLD, but little is known about the effects of different coffee types, which vary in chemica...
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Objectives: To investigate if non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) impacts mortality and adverse outcomes for individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design: Systematic review. Data sources: PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched up to 1 February 2020 with no restriction on the earliest date. Eligibility criteria for sele...
Article
Rationale & objective: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with limited strategies for prevention and treatment. Coffee is a complex mixture of chemicals, and consumption has been associated with mostly beneficial health outcomes. This work aimed to determine the impact of coffee consumption on kid...
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Objective To evaluate uptake, risk factor detection and management from the National Health Service (NHS) Health Check (HC). Design This is a quasi-randomised controlled trial where participants were allocated to five cohorts based on birth year. Four cohorts were invited for an NHS HC between April 2011 and March 2015. Setting 151 general practi...
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Objectives To evaluate the existing evidence for associations between coffee consumption and multiple health outcomes. Design Umbrella review of the evidence across meta-analyses of observational and interventional studies of coffee consumption and any health outcome. Data sources PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, a...
Data
Appendix 4: GRADE classification of quality of evidence
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Objectives To examine the association between coffee, including caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and assess the influence of HCC aetiology and pre-existing liver disease. Design We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis. We calculated relative risks (RRs) of HCC according to caffeinated and decaffe...
Article
Background The enhanced liver fibrosis (ELF) blood test has recently been recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to test for advanced fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The ELF test involves calculating a score from the concentrations of serum biomarkers: tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP...
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We read with interest the meta-analysis [Shen et al. 2016] in Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology regarding the association between caffeine and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The authors analysed separately the associations of (1) caffeine from ‘regular coffee’, which has been described elsewhere as ‘filtrated coffee’ [Anty et al....
Article
Background Liver cirrhosis is a large burden on global health, causing over one million deaths per year. Observational studies have reported an inverse association between coffee and cirrhosis. AimsTo perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to characterise the relationship between coffee consumption and cirrhosis. Methods We searched for stud...

Citations

... Compared to non-consumers, the risk of developing chronic liver disease, steatosis, and cancer was reduced by 20%, while the risk of death from a liver pathology was reduced by 49% in coffee consumers. This reduction was found with all types of coffee, regular caffeinated ground coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and instant coffee [187]. Likewise, another relatively recent cohort study including 1019 patients reported that high coffee consumers had a lower risk of advanced liver fibrosis than the reference group. ...
... Use of a single pathologist to read all biopsies would have been preferred but was not possible. ELF constituent analytes are stable under a range of storage conditions and ELF score is not significantly impacted by changes in single analyte concentrations given its logarithmic algorithm [30]. This is reassuring that ELF scores are accurate and reliable despite samples being collected at multiple centres during different time periods. ...
... This process is mediated by aryl sulfotransferase and is the basic pathway of forming PCS from uPC. There is an extensive body of evidence supporting the detrimental effects ESRD has on dyslipidemia (106)(107)(108)(109)(110)(111) and the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (112)(113)(114)(115)(116)(117). This coupled with the findings of downregulated hepatic sulfotransferase expression and activity in both NASH and NAFLD (105,118) could possibly explain the increased (detected) uPC concentrations in patients on dialysis as opposed to healthy individuals. ...
... Results from IVW, MR-Egger, weighted median, and weighted mode approaches all showed that omega-3 fatty acids were casually associated with low risk of lung cancer. IVW, MR-Egger, and weighted median are commonly applied approaches in MR analyses [26]. Each approach has its own advantages and disadvantages in the consistency and test performance of causal effect estimation, and the performance of causal effect is also different due to unverifiable assumptions [27]. ...
... Не следует пренебрегать измерением ОТ с целью выявления АО. Именно АО с эктопическим распределением жировой ткани в печени, поджелудочной железе, периваскулярно и эпикардиально имеет важное значение в развитии кардиометаболических нарушений [205]. ...
... Another health behavior associated with potential psychological benefits is coffee consumption [8]. Numerous studies have demonstrated associations between higher levels of coffee intake and a lower risk of suicide and depression [9][10][11][12]. ...
... Studies have revealed that drinking 3-4 cups of caffeinecontaining foods each day can increase the risk of renal disease and the progression at which kidney function declines. [1] Since caffeine is contained in most daily drinks and teas, so many people are often negatively affected by it. Caffeine has been found to improve alertness and memory, but it can also negatively affect sleep. ...
... [4] Another meta-analysis of 26 studies showed that an additional intake of two cups of coffee per day was associated with a 35% lower HCC risk. [5] Green tea consumption was inversely related to liver cancer risk in a meta-analysis of nine cohort articles. [6] A metaanalysis of 15 studies also reported an inverse association between yogurt intake and liver cancer risk. ...
... Moreover, two of the five studies analyzed by Saab also argued that coffee decreased the risk for the worst stages of NAFLD, meaning fibrosis alone or fibrosis and NASH [20]. However, controversies remain regarding whether espresso or filtered coffee has the same beneficial effects on NAFLD [24]. Chen S. and colleagues [25] were the first authors who published a systematic review focusing on the relationship between coffee consumption and NAFLD. ...
... Dose-dependent coffee benefit has been observed in reduction of all-cause mortality [28] as well as mortality associated with other chronic diseases [29]. Disease modification has also been observed with coffee including reduced risk of cirrhosis development among chronic liver disease patients [30] and even delay in onset of Parkinson's disease [31]. In our study, we observed AIH patients that never drank coffee had an earlier median age of disease onset compared to AIH patients that ever drank coffee (Table 3) albeit a significant missing proportion with available age of diagnosis. ...