Nobuhito Jin's research while affiliated with Hokkaido University and other places

Publications (8)

Article
In this paper I present an argument that culture of collectivism which characterizes Japanese society is to be conceived in terms of an equilibrium between socio-relational and cognitive traits in which people have acquired expectations for generalized reciprocity within, not across, group boundaries. Maintenance of harmony among group members and...
Article
The abstract for this document is available on CSA Illumina.To view the Abstract, click the Abstract button above the document title.
Article
Two experiments examined the effect of illusion of control on in-group favoritism found in the minimal group situation (Tajfel, Billig, Bundy, & Flament, 1971). In bilateral dependency condition, each member made allocation decisions for in-group as well as out-group participants. It was exactly the same situation used in the original studies under...
Article
Full-text available
Ingroup bias found in the Minimal Group Paradigm is an important finding for theories of intergroup relations. However, explanation of the finding is controversial. In this study, we contrast the Social Identity Theory explanation of ingroup bias with / a new alternative hypothesis. We argue that ingroup bias is a result of subjects employing a sel...
Article
The purpose of the present study was to examine how the existence of multiple Prisoner's Dilemma (PD) relationships influence the development of a network system among participants and behaviour in each PD relationship. The experiment consisted of two conditions. In one condition (network conditon), subjects were required to make a two-step decisio...
Article
Full-text available
To date, most research on prisoner’s dilemmas has dealt with isolated dyads. However, most PD-like relations in the real world take place in a network of relations where each player has a choice of partners. In this research project, we have created a situation where (1) every member of a group selects a partner (that is, two parties form a relatio...

Citations

... The experiment that I present below was conducted by a colleague of mine, the late Hiromi Shinotsuka, and my former graduate students, Nobuhito Jin and Nahoko Hayashi ( Jin et al. 1993 ). It examined the formation of commitment relationships between particular partners in the situation in which participants were allowed to freely choose the partner with whom to play a Prisoner's Dilemma. ...
... In the current study, regardless of the framing condition, the amount of investment in the between-group pool was not higher than that in the within-group pool, consistent with previous findings 14,68 . These findings support another evolutionary model of intergroup bias, namely, bounded generalized reciprocity (BGR) 17,22,74 . The BGR model holds that in-group bias stems from cooperation with in-group members rather than aggression toward out-group members 20,69,75 . ...
... Refinements to the minimal group paradigm suggest that some of the more costly ingroup favoring behavior is not so easily triggered by lab manipulations, and that these may depend on participants' importing expectations from similar situations in their daily lives. Specifically, participants need to believe that norms of within-group reciprocity will apply in this new setting (Balliet et al., 2014;Yamagishi et al., 1999). In Conan Doyle's "The Red-Headed League" criminals convince a pawnbroker to leave his shop unattended by offering him a well-paid position by virtue of having the right hair color (1892). ...
... Additionally, if we had specifically recruited participants that have such experiences, we may have found more ingroup bias effects. Related to this, research has found that ingroup bias seems to emerge in minimal group situations only when individuals are dependent on the target in some way (Karp et al., 1993). Perhaps this interdependence can be achieved when individuals deeply identify with their gender and, therefore, care deeply about how other members of that gender may influence the group's reputation. ...
... For example, in a model where individuals interact in their local network, cut ties with individuals of low reputation and establish new relations with nearby individuals with the highest reputation (or with a random agent), free-riders get abandoned and stable and high levels of cooperation emerge parallel with a highly cohesive network structure [136]. This line of research follows up on early modelling work on 'prisoner's dilemma networks' [185,186] and matches with the results of analytical work that analyses equilibria in games on networks [187]. Experiments also found that dynamics of partner updates based on reputational information lead to high assortativity and stable cooperation [147]. ...
... On one hand, collectivism may be associated with higher in-group bias in the MGP because individuals in collectivistic cultures tend to value harmony among group members and cooperation to achieve mutual goals (Triandis, 1990(Triandis, , 1994. Moreover, the social enjoinments are characterized by close-knit groups (Yamagishi et al., 1998). On the other hand, collectivism may also be associated with lower in-group bias in the MGP because individuals in collectivistic cultures already have strong, stable, and immutable individual-group associations, and are not concerned about their identities or inclusion in novel minimal groups (Hogg, 2000(Hogg, , 2007Falk et al., 2014). ...
... Jin and his colleagues have reexamined minimal groups experiments (Jin & Yamagishi, 1997;Jin, Yamagishi, & Kiyonari, 1996). They informed to a participant that 'other ingroup members did not know that he/she was allocated to their group'. ...
Reference: non title