Nikoleta Yordanova's research while affiliated with Leiden University and other places

Publications (23)

Preprint
Effective enforcement is essential for international cooperation. Accordingly, the European Union (EU) has developed a number of formal tools for enforcing its laws and policies in the members states. The application of these tools, however, has been slow, timid and uneven. One of the possible reasons for this is the fear that enforcement by supran...
Article
Existing research largely agrees that to minimize ministerial drift, political parties in multiparty governments tend to use parliamentary committees to monitor each other. Particularly, they strive to chair parliamentary committees corresponding to ministerial departments to keep tabs on their ruling partners. Yet, policing ministerial activities...
Article
Full-text available
Although democratic governance imposes temporal constraints, the timing of government policy making activities such as bill initiation is still poorly understood. This holds especially under coalition governments, in which government bills need to find approval by a partner party in parliament. We propose a dynamic temporal perspective in which min...
Article
Full-text available
The United Kingdom’s 2016 ‘Brexit’ referendum vote to leave the European Union (EU) raised concerns that other countries would follow suit. This article examines how arguments about EU membership related to economic, cultural, political, and security and peace issues could influence how citizens would vote in EU membership referendums. Our two-wave...
Article
Full-text available
Drawing on an original and unprecedented survey data set of 243 medium-and big-sized firms operating in five sectors(energy, telecommunications, railways, airlines, and postal services) and across 29 European countries, we analyse what incentivizes firms to interact with and influence multiple regulators. In so doing, we map the regulatory opportun...
Article
Most EU legislation consists of executive acts of the European Commission. The Lisbon Treaty introduced a new type of EU executive legislation – delegated acts, which give the European Parliament formal powers of legislative scrutiny equal to those of the EU Council. Thus, the use of delegated acts could reinforce the institutional balance of power...
Article
Drawing on an original and unprecedented survey data set of 243 medium-and big-sized firms operating in five sectors(energy, telecommunications, railways, airlines, and postal services) and across 29 European countries, we analyse what incentivizes firms to interact with and influence multiple regulators. In so doing, we map the regulatory opportun...
Article
Career Behaviour and the European Parliament: All Roads Lead Through Brussels? By William T. Daniel. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. 224p. $85.00 cloth. - Ambitious Politicians: The Implications of Career Ambition in Representative Democracy. By Patrik Öhberg. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2017. 168p. $50.00 cloth, $24.95 paper. - Vo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We present an overview and the results of a shared-task hackathon that took place as part of a research seminar bringing together a variety of experts and young researchers from the fields of political science, natural language processing and computational social science. The task looked at ways to develop novel methods for political text scaling t...
Article
Why do legislators choose to vote ‘Abstain’ instead of ‘Yea’ or ‘Nay’? Is it because they shy away from taking sides when facing competing demands? We address this question by studying roll-call vote data on the sixth European Parliament. In line with our principal–agent approach, we find that Members of the European Parliament are prone to strateg...
Article
This article seeks to explain the 2013 coalition between the CDU and the Greens in the German federal state of Hesse. It applies traditional office-seeking and policy-seeking coalition formation theories to the case alongside a new explanation underscoring the influence of past behaviour on coalition partnership; namely, the negative impact of a pr...
Article
Full-text available
This article seeks to explain the 2013 coalition between the CDU and the Greens in the German federal state of Hesse. It applies traditional office-seeking and policy-seeking coalition formation theories to the case alongside a new explanation underscoring the influence of past behaviour on coalition partnership; namely, the negative impact of a pr...
Article
Legislative politics scholars rely heavily on roll call vote (RCV) data. However, it has been claimed that strategic motives behind RCV requests lead to overestimating party group cohesion and, thus, biased findings on legislative behaviour. To explore this claim, we distinguish between two types of bias, a ‘behavioural bias’ and a ‘selection bias’...
Article
Research on member states’ compliance with European Union legislation often focuses on the timing of self-reported implementation measures. It is generally assumed that the earlier a member state adopts an implementation measure the more compliant it is. This is problematic because early measures may only partially address the goals of a European U...
Article
To understand legislative behavior and party politics in the European Parliament (EP), scholars to date have heavily relied on roll-call vote (RCV) data. However, only a subset of all EP votes is taken by roll call. Furthermore, it has been argued that EP party groups may be requesting RCVs for strategic reasons. This can lead to a selection bias i...
Article
The legislative organization of the European Parliament (EP) has far-reaching implications for its ability to solve the democratic deficit problem of the European Union (EU). Recognizing that, this article reviews the literature on the EP organization with a view to consolidating existing knowledge and identifying outstanding research gaps. It call...
Article
Studies on the European Parliament have largely overlooked the impact of the inter-institutional context on its internal organisation. This paper argues that the stronger legislative powers of the Parliament vis-à-vis the Council of Ministers under the co-decision than under the consultation procedure affect the intra-parliamentary allocation of di...
Article
Studies on the internal organization of the European Parliament (EP) have largely overlooked the impact of its inter-institutional context. Addressing the gap, this paper examines how the different inter-institutional balance of power under the consultation and codecision legislative procedures affects the intra-parliamentary allocation of consulta...
Article
This paper questions the claim that the European Parliament (EP) is a legislature with strong committees. It examines to what extent the plenary adopts committee reports as the official parliamentary legislative positions under codecision. The committees' impact is expected to be substantially weakened when an informal early agreement is reached wi...
Article
Although most of the legislative tasks of the European Parliament (EP) are performed in its committees, it is controversial how representative they are of the overall plenary. Distributive, informational and partisan theories suggest respectively that the committee assignments system is designed to (1) serve special interests outside the EP, (2) br...
Article
This paper questions the claim that the European Parliament (EP) is a legislature with strong committees. It examines the extent to which the plenary draws its legislative position on the basis of the draft committee reports under the codecision procedure. It is expected that the committees’ impact is substantially decreased if an early agreement i...
Article
The link between administrative discretion within EU directives and national implementation remains hotly contested in the academic literature. In this paper we offer a formal game-theoretic model which predicts that the effect of discretion on the timing of formal implementation would be contingent on the cycle of government alterations. In short,...

Citations

... Researchers have, therefore, proposed a 'wholesale party-politicization' of Finnish committees (Arter, 1984, p. 201). Although the discretionary powers of committee chairs are limited, recent evidence suggests that government ministers do consider the policy preferences of the committee chairs before submitting bill proposals (Lin & Yordanova, 2022). Furthermore, government programmes have become considerably longer and more detailed since the late 1990s and it is expected that the cabinet parties and their parliamentary groups respect them. ...
... Brexit poses a serious threat for EU continuity, as fears of sovereignty loss and exposure to information about the UK's sovereignty gains following Brexit increase Euroscepticism and willingness to leave the EU (Hobolt et al., 2022;Yordanova et al., 2020). ...
... The measurement should thus be seen as an approximation of the preference heterogeneity within an institution, where institutional preference statistics are a function of the national parties represented within (e.g. Yordanova and Zhelyazkova, 2020). ...
... Bilbao-Jayo and Almeida [25] analysed the political discourse of the Spanish 2015 and 2016 general elections in Twitter, exclusively using as training data manually annotated political manifestos and a simplified political message taxonomy. In [26], Kahmann et al. used english political manifestos to measure the level of Euroscepticism transcripts of speeches from the European parliament. To do so, they only used the relevant policy categories for this task: European Community/Union (Positive and Negative) and National Way of Life(Positive and Negative). ...
... Depending on the policy issue and on the national salience of an issue, MEPs may decide to defect from their political group line (Rasmussen 2008). In situations when political group and national positions clash, MEPs often opt for an abstention in the parliamentary vote (Mühlböck and Yordanova 2017). Despite these conflicts, the majority of empirical studies on decision-making in the EP find that political group membership remains an important predictor of MEPs voting behaviour (Mühlböck 2012;Hix et al. 2006). ...
... • any type of policy-related organization, including political party groups (Bartle & Bellucci, 2009); • any type of group related to the region or locality to which the individuals belong. This refers to the conflict between subnational and national levels of policy-making (Hildebrandt & Trüdinger, 2020) but also to geographical affiliations of place (Devine-Wright & Howes, 2010) or supranational, more abstract identities such as European identities (Kuhn & Nicoli, 2020); • sectoral groups that emerge from sectoral professionalization and ongoing sectoral collaboration on a particular topical issue (Eriksson, 2017), and resulting policy styles (Padgett, 1990); • demographic and biographical identities that involve an individual's early socialization through education and work experience, but also less formalized life experiences and biographical events; • informal groups in the policy process, consisting of an informal collaboration familiar from the US Congress (Stevens et al., 1981) and other parliaments (Osei & Malang, 2016;Steinert & Yordanova, 2016). ...
... It is important to note that our analysis draws on roll-call votes only, which are but a subset of votes in the EP. Research on roll-call votes has greatly informed our understanding of EU legislative politics (Hix et al. 2007) but has also attracted criticism (Carruba et al. 2006(Carruba et al. , 2008Høyland 2010;Yordanova and Mühlböck 2015). Yordanova and Mühlböck (2015) differentiate between two main concerns: a 'behavioural bias' and a 'selection bias'. ...
... However, distortions between notified and actual transposition are greater for some member states, which points to a serious bias in the data (ibid.). Moreover, delays say little about whether transposition is correct (König and Mäder 2013;Hartlapp and Falkner 2009;Zhelyazkova and Yordanova 2015). Member states have substantial discretion when transposing EU directives. ...
... Overall, the remote voting system gave MEPs more freedom regarding their votes. Usually, when sitting in committee or in plenary, members get written voting instructions before the meeting and may follow them if they want to show loyalty (Mühlböck & Yordanova, 2017, 2012. These voting lists, which are subject to a democratic decision-process within the group, can also indicate that the vote is a "free vote". ...
... More senior MEPs are also more likely to get into leadership positions at the committee level (Beauvallet and Michon, 2010;Chiru, 2019;Treib and Schlipphak, 2019). While age and EP experience are not systematically related to membership in certain committees (Bowler and Farrell, 1995;Yordanova, 2009), MEPs are very often re-appointed to committees they have served on before (McElroy, 2006;Whitaker, 2019) and committee-based seniority also strongly affects an MEP's chances to get into leadership positions in the party group (Daniel and Thierse, 2018). Recent research has also demonstrated that own-initiative reports by the EP are more likely to be taken up by the European Commission in its working program if they are drafted by experienced rapporteurs (Webb and Kreppel, 2020). ...