Nikolas Coupland's research while affiliated with Cardiff University and other places

Publications (101)

Chapter
We are concerned here with the place branding and marketing of material objects offered for sale, and with particular artifacts made and sold in bilingual Ireland and Wales. We consider two specific cases: the Melin Tregwynt woollen mill located on the St. Davids peninsula in southwest Wales (www.melintregwynt.co.uk), and the Louis Mulcahy pottery...
Article
en Despite some well‐known problems in its early formulation, Labov's concept of ‘the vernacular’ has enduring relevance in sociolinguistics. This is even more the case if we recast it more abstractly – as ‘vernacularity’, ideologically contrasted with ‘standardness’. Following Labov, class‐associated vernacular practices have been a major empirica...
Chapter
Sociolinguistics is a dynamic field of research that explains the role and function of language in social life. This book offers the most substantial account available of the core contemporary ideas and arguments in sociolinguistics, with an emphasis on innovation and change. Bringing together original writing by more than twenty of the field's mos...
Chapter
Sociolinguistics is a dynamic field of research that explains the role and function of language in social life. This book offers the most substantial account available of the core contemporary ideas and arguments in sociolinguistics, with an emphasis on innovation and change. Bringing together original writing by more than twenty of the field's mos...
Book
This leading team of scholars presents a fascinating book about change: shifting political, economic and cultural conditions; ephemeral, sometimes even seasonal, multilingualism; and altered imaginaries for minority and indigenous languages and their users. The authors refer to this network of interlinked changes as the new conditions surrounding s...
Research
Full-text available
Invited Panel - Sociolinguistics of Globalization Conference, University of Hong Kong, 3-6 June 2015
Article
Heritage tourism commonly involves displays designed to represent and commemorate a valued cultural past. Our particular focus in this paper is mining heritage, and how it has been developed in Wales and Cornwall to reflect their rather different, but culturally and nationally defining, industrial histories. From some historical and critical perspe...
Article
This article develops an interpretive perspective on public displays of bilingualism. Photographic data from contemporary Wales illustrate how public bilingual—Welsh and English—displays are organized in different frames, reflecting historically changing language-ideological priorities and more local symbolic markets. In institutionally driven disp...
Article
Earlier sociolinguistic studies have conceptualised popular song as a field of phonological variation where singers do or do not maintain features of their national or regional accents in singing. The present paper explores a wider agenda for the sociolinguistics of popular song, theorised as a diverse field of performance organised according to ge...
Article
This study presents a distributional analysis of the frequency of use of numbers – numbers in words as well as numerals, between one and one hundred – on the world-wide web. The results show a regular pattern of declining frequency of use with increasing size of numbers. Breaks in the regularity of this pattern suggest that specific groups of numbe...
Chapter
The End of Globalization?Global Multilingualism, World Languages and Language SystemsGlobal Discourse in Key Domains and GenresLanguage, Values, and Markets under GlobalizationLanguage, Distance, and IdentitiesReferences
Article
Linguistic landscapes have, in the main, been analyzed distributionally, noting the preponderance of different language codes in particular settings. In contrast, we develop a qualitative, critical, frame-analytic account of Welsh language and culture, as displayed in texts in public spaces in Patagonia, the site of a Welsh colonial experiment in t...
Article
A total of 956 informants with links to Wales - from Patagonia, North America, and Wales itself - completed a questionnaire investigating their Welsh identities and affiliation, their images of Wales, their engagement with Welsh cultural practices, and their perceptions of the ethnolinguistic vitality of the Welsh language and of domain priorities...
Article
Linguistic Landscapes: A Comparative Analysis of Urban Multilingualism in Tokyo by Linguistic Landscape: A New Approach to Multilingualism by Durk Gorter. . Article first published online: 8 APR 2008.
Article
We report quantitative results from a large online survey of 5010 U.K. informants' reactions to 34 different accents of English, based on simple accent labels. Patterns of accent evaluation, in terms of adjudged levels of prestige, social attractiveness and some other variables, in many regards confirm broad findings from earlier research. Accent-t...
Article
Style refers to ways of speaking - how speakers use the resource of language variation to make meaning in social encounters. This 2007 book develops a coherent theoretical approach to style in sociolinguistics, illustrated with copious examples. It explains how speakers project different social identities and create different social relationships t...
Article
A survey of approximately 2,000 informants with links to Wales provided differentiated data on Welsh social identities and affiliation, engagement with Welsh cultural practices, and perceptions of the ethnolinguistic vitality of the Welsh language and of domain priorities for Welsh. The data were interrogated mainly in relation to “flowgroups” (par...
Article
John Aitchison & Harold Carter (eds.), Spreading the word: The Welsh language 2001. Talybont, Ceredigion: Y Lolfa Cyf., 2004. Pp. 160. Pb. £8.95. For three decades, John Aitchison and Harold Carter (A&C) have shouldered principal responsibility for interpreting the results of the decennial UK census as it relates to the use of the Welsh language in...
Article
A new survey of 777 informants, widely distributed in Wales, allows us to reassess conventional understandings of ethnolinguistic diversity in Wales, particularly as regards subjective variables to do with ethnic identity and belonging. Our findings are set against Denis Balsom's widely cited 'three-Wales model', and against geographical data relat...
Chapter
The last three decades have seen a general shift in social scientific theorizing of identity, from relatively static to more dynamic models, although what these terms mean is itself open to dispute. An early, key voice arguing for this realignment was that of George Herbert Mead in a nascent social psychology (Mead 1932, 1934). Mead argued that the...
Article
The acceleration and growth of consumerism that has accompanied globali- sation has led a number of theorists to argue that social life is becoming increasingly commodified, with many social objects and processes taking on new values and significances. Taking our evidence from a 150-year sam- ple of consumer ads from a North American Welsh communit...
Article
Globalization has led to semiotic forms in general taking on new values. We report on the trends and values of photographic images in a sample (1948–2001) of a North American newspaper (Y Drych), established in 1851 to serve the Welsh migrant community there. For such diasporic groups, visual imagery of this kind potentially links them with their ‘...
Article
Peter Garrett, Nikolas Coupland & Angie Williams, Investigating language attitudes: Social meanings of dialect, ethnicity and performance. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2003. x + 251 pp. Hb $79.95. As its title suggests, this book focuses on attitudes to language and dialect production, perception, and use, and particularly on attitudes to la...
Article
The abstract for this document is available on CSA Illumina.To view the Abstract, click the Abstract button above the document title.
Article
This paper contrasts findings from a new survey of 5010 informants from across the UK, conducted in collaboration with the BBC, with the findings of Giles's (1970) influential study of the social evaluation of some of the major English accents relevant to the UK. Despite differences in the designs of the two studies, this comparison allows us to as...
Article
The abstract for this document is available on CSA Illumina.To view the Abstract, click the Abstract button above the document title.
Article
The abstract for this document is available on CSA Illumina.To view the Abstract, click the Abstract button above the document title.
Article
This paper explores the adoption of aspects of Welsh social identity by members of an American college choir specialising in Welsh repertoire. Drawing on questionnaires, face-to-faceande-mailinterviews,andrecordingsofthechoirinperformance,apicture is built up of the singers' attitudes towards Welsh people, culture and language, and their linguistic...
Article
Global population flows leave some social groups dislocated from their home territories and languages. Under these conditions processes of ethnolinguistic identification can become complex and the use of a home language can take on new symbolic values. We consider the case of Welsh-affiliating people in the United States of America, and the use of...
Article
Book reviewed in this article: Standard English: The Widening Debate. Tony Bex and Richard J. Watts (eds.).
Article
Mainstream news broadcasting pursues an authentication project, to bolster its claims to serious, weighty and factual news reporting. News review contributes to this project when it seeks to humanize front-stage news personnel. It moves away from the traditional, institutionalized concern with `authenticity-from-above' and works to generate `authen...
Article
Stylization is the knowing deployment of culturally familiar styles and identities that are marked as deviating from those predictably associated with the current speaking context. Dialect stylization involves performing non-current-first-person personas by phonological and related means, sometimes in play or parody. Although these processes m...
Article
Dans l'article Negotiating sun use publie en 1998, les As. ont utilise un corpus compose d'entretiens avec des personnes en train de bronzer sur les plages du Pays de Galles et de Nouvelle Zelande dans le but d'analyser les divers discours sur l'usage du soleil et sur ses risques pour la sante. Cet article a ensuite fait l'objet de critiques de la...
Article
School students (15Welshness” of the speaker/narratives were grounded in the regional dialect properties; but other judgments, such as the likability of the speakers, tended to draw on features of both dialect and narrative. In addition, comparison of students and teachers revealed differences in their evaluations of particular dialect communities...
Article
Interview data from beach-side interviews conducted in Wales and New Zealand were analysed to examine the formatting of responses made to questions about the health implications of bodily exposure to the sun. People interviewed articulated widely varying stances and value-systems, varying from compliance with institutional prescriptions of safe sun...
Article
This paper reflects on how the new wave of communication and aging research is constituted, theoretically and methodologically. We argue that a reflexive critique is now needed, particularly in order to focus current and future research initiatives as part of an applied research program. Current studies, including those in this special issue, are s...
Article
We present a discourse analysis of socially supportive interactions in a UK geriatric medical context. Three overlapping sets of discourse processes are discussed: first, how doctors are concerned to resist and renegotiate patients' ideological values of ageing and health, interactively; second, the collaborative negotiation of depression and the c...
Article
Ten years of an interdisciplinary programme of research into language and ageing is reviewed in this paper. Framed as a cumulative programme drawing on sociolinguistics and the social psychology of language, the research has nevertheless foregrounded many criterial issues in the debate about priorities in applied linguistics (as these have been sum...
Article
This paper addresses the issue of the role of the social component in a theory of communication. In the first, theoretical part of the paper, we examine what constitutes an adequate social, or sociolinguistic, basis for modeling communication. We ask whether there may be radically different orientations to social assumptions about communication by...
Book
In the first volume of this kind for years, the editors have assembled a definitive view of the discipline bringing together much original work in sociolinguistics, ranging from fundamental theoretical statements and methodological articles, to classic explorations in dialect and style variation, language attitudes and stereotyping, multilingualism...
Article
This paper suggests a competing discourses formulation for ecolinguistics. In relation to the issue of ozone depletion and consequent acknowledged health hazards, more general environmental concerns are opposed by traditional, recreational discourses which assert that sun-use is `fun'. A more contemporary discourse which legitimizes, commodifies an...
Article
The paper reports qualitative analyses of teachers' attitudes to and perceptions of English-language varieties in Wales. In the general manner of Preston's 'perceptual dialectology' approach, respondents were asked to draw and label on a map what they perceived to be the principal accent/dialect zones of English speech in Wales, and to construct ev...
Article
This paper summarises some of the findings from a project in progress which researches teachers’ sociolinguistic awareness in Wales. A questionnaire was sent to secondary teachers all over Wales to investigate their perceptions of, and attitudes towards, geographical varieties of Welsh English. They were asked to draw in what they felt to be the ma...
Article
Traditional approaches to identity across the lifespan have assumed that age itself and generational statuses and roles determine "who we can be." In contrast, a discursive perspective can show how, during interaction, we actively construct age-salient identities for ourselves and others through talk. Conversational processes of age-identity manage...
Article
Institutional discourse typically involves a dialectic between institutional (e.g. medical) frames and socio-relational frames for talk. The paper draws on audio-recorded data from a geriatric outpatients clinic in the UK to show how doctors and elderly patients collaborate in and negotiate the work of entering an apparently medical frame of talk....
Article
Research into the social meanings of Welsh, Welsh English, and Standard British English has produced mixed findings over the years. For example, Welsh English has been judged as highly as Welsh in some studies; in others, both Welsh English and Standard British English have been downgraded relative to Welsh. This study measured the evaluations of t...
Chapter
This chapter discusses stereotyping and affect in discourse and presents the meaning of elderly, painful self-disclosure. It is always possible to subsume research on stereotyping within a general attitude–behavior framework, where attitudes are held to comprise an affective, conative, and cognitive dimension. However, neither of the key orienting...
Article
In the body of the book we explore the emerging finding that talk between the generations may have characteristic configurations, that cross- and within-generation talk can be modelled in terms of recurring discourse strategies that intersect in important ways with beliefs and ideologies of ageing (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights...
Article
When the label ‘ageist’ is attributed to social practices, different sets of moral criteria can be in question. Some aspects of the everyday talk of older people that we examine in this article can themselves be taken to reproduce ageist assumptions, in the sense of self-disenfranchisement. We show how elderly patients at a Geriatrics Outpatients c...
Article
This paper provides an initial review of social scientific research on the causes and effects of alcohol use and abuse. We argue that such work is, in general, overly psycho-individualistic in its theoretical and social policy orientations. Yet alcohol issues have, with few exceptions, been ignored in communication and sociolinguistic studies, even...
Article
Using an independent samples factorial design, this study examined the roles of accent (standard vs. nonstandard), speech rate (fast vs. medium vs. slow), and age of voice (younger vs. older sounding) on British listeners’ social evaluations of audiotaped voices using the matched-guise technique. In addition, listener judges’ level and nature of co...
Article
Full-text available
Since its introduction by Malinowski in the 1920s, “phatic communion” has often been appealed to as a concept in sociolinguistics, semantics, stylistics, and communication, typically taken to designate a conventionalized and desemanticized discourse mode or “type.” But a negotiation perspective, following the conversation analysis tradition of rese...
Article
A program of research conducted within an anti-agism paradigm demonstrates that young people process and respond to the speech of older people in stereotypical ways. Such conclusions result from studies using a variety of research methods. Experimental studies demonstrate that older-sounding speech triggers age schematic responses and that young pe...
Chapter
The theory of accommodation is concerned with motivations underlying and consequences arising from ways in which we adapt our language and communication patterns toward others. Since accommodation theory's emergence in the early l970s, it has attracted empirical attention across many disciplines and has been elaborated and expanded many times. In C...
Article
Micro-analyses of talk in context can expose people's activation and evaluation of age categorisations, as personal and social identities, during interactional exchanges. In this paper, we briefly overview our own discourse analytic research, which has been concerned with the management of age and health identities in across- and within- generation...
Article
It is illuminating to study identity as a dynamic, interactionally achieved process rather than as a static, intraindividual construct. Our article identifies and seeks to overview the diverse means by which the age identities of elderly (aged 70–87) interactants are formulated in a corpus of 40 cross‐generation and within‐generation conversations,...
Article
Although interpersonal communication lies at the heart of social support processes, there has been very little recourse in this literature to the models and methods of the language and communication sciences. Communication accommodation theory is proposed here as an appropriate interactional model able to specify social support in action, its conte...
Article
The purpose of this study was to enhance our understanding of beliefs that the young hold about influence communication between the young the old. Thus, beliefs about intergenerational compliance gaining were explored in a role play situation adapted to a 2 X 2 X 2 factorial design: young respondents envisaged themselves either as a young person or...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding communicative action requires bridging two worlds: the world of social actors with the purposes, concerns, and 'goals' that motivate their actions, and the world of discourse in which everyday actors' goals are expressed and inferred. This paper overviews two distinct approaches to building that bridge, discourse studies and communica...
Article
Full-text available
This paper is an attempt to articulate basic questions in this fragmented field in pursuit of a more interdisciplinary framework, one which recognises the important mediating roles of individual cognitions as a complement to sociostructural analyses. As an untapped resource, there is an ever‐increasing number of, admittedly diverse, theoretical mod...
Article
Data were drawn from 40 videotaped interactions involving elderly (aged 70–87 yrs) and younger (aged 30–40 yrs) women. 20 dyads were intergenerational (young–old), 10 were peer-young, and 10 were peer-elderly. The distribution of painful self-disclosures (PSDs), which included such topics as bereavement, severe ill health, loneliness, and disengage...
Article
Full-text available
The article begins by exploring briefly the role of the elderly in sociolinguistic theory and research. After an outline of the parameters of speech accommodation theory together with a new schematic model, it is argued that speech accommodation theory is a profitable framework for elucidating the sociolinguistic mechanics of, and the social psycho...
Article
A study examined the discourse sequences and routines through which older adults disclose their ages to others. Data are drawn from conversations between women, who were asked to "get to know each other," and interviews with 34 women and 6 men in an elderly day care center. The second source group was used only to support the distribution evidence...
Article
Discusses the case of segmental phonological style-shifting in a broad-accented male Cardiff English speaker employed as a radio personality and entertainer. The S's stylistic selections were analyzed in relation to complexes of motivational factors operative at different points during one segment of a radio-request show. Results suggest that socia...
Article
Studies of linguistic variation in communities ought to be able to capture variable patterns of discourse. But there are problems in quantitatively studying variable realisations of functional units, because it is impossible to list variants exhaustively. A more abstract approach to discourse variation can examine the distribution of variants which...
Article
Linguistic landscape is a metaphorical concept, extrapolated from the concept of natural landscape 1 'animals grazing peacefully on a hillside, waves lapping gently up the pebble beach, a pine forest whistling in a storm, a river bursting its banks, a hurricane tossing houses and cars in the air like play-things, a bush fire raging out of control'...
Article
Globalization has led to semiotic forms in general taking on new values. We report on the trends and values of photographic images in a sample (1948-2001) of a North American newspaper (Y Drych), established in 1851 to serve the Welsh migrant community there. For such diasporic groups, visual imagery of this kind potentially links them with their '...
Article
review the still relatively small number of studies of communication and aging that might be termed discourse analytic / make connections between this increasingly influential paradigm and wider interdisciplinary and theoretical concerns with aging, identity, and the life span intergenerational talk and institutionalization / discourse, self-iden...

Citations

... 24 As noted at the very beginning, formulating 23 One can invoke the authority of Arjun Appadurai here: "This theory of a breakor rupturewith its strong emphasis on electronic mediation and mass migration, is necessarily a theory of the recent past (or the extended present) because it is only in the past two decades or so that media and migration have become so massively globalized, that is to say, active across large and irregular transnational terrains" (1996: 9). 24 I reiterate here an assumption already voiced by Anthony Giddens (1976: 127): "(…) language as a practical activity is so central to social life that in some basic respects it can be treated as exemplifying theories is not exactly sociolinguists' bread and butterbut the editor of a recent volume on theoretical debates in sociolinguistics explicitly invites it (Coupland 2016). So let me try. ...
... We define register as those aspects of socially recurring intra-individual variation that are influenced by situational and functional settings (similar to the definition in Biber & Conrad 2009), adopting a broad understanding of situation and function. The term register has been used in many different ways, and other terms, such as diaphasic variation, context(ual) style, functional style and 3 tenor have sometimes been used in ways that are similar to or overlap with how we use register here (Halliday et al. 1964;Labov 1966;Trudgill 1974;Coupland 1980;Milroy 1987;Giles et al. 1991b;Giles & Coupland 1991;Eckert & Rickford 2001;Halliday & Matthiessen 2004;Auer 2007;Croft 2010;Maas 2010;Biber & Conrad 2009, and many more). For the purposes of this proposal, we make a distinction between register as just defined and style as those aspects of an author's production that are individual. ...
...  Language as context, such as pronominal address and reference as powerful markers of relational frames (Coupland & Coupland, 2000). ...
... However, in its core, interculturalism emphasizes the mutual exchange of cultural norms and respect for all cultures, while multiculturalism refers to societies that comprise a range of ethnic groups, which live alongside one another but do not necessarily interact. 230 and emotional stress of dealing with the unfamiliar, (b) quickly establish rapport with others, (c) sense other people's feelings, (d) communicate effectively with people from varying backgrounds, and (e) respond adequately to miscommunication (quoted in Giles et al. 1991). Therefore, at least two prerequisites need to be fulfilled for the students to reach the desired level of intercultural communication and deal effectively with intercultural challenges: the teaching content needs to expand beyond the borders of the traditional, often monocultural approach to education that focuses primarily on the dominant culture, and the teachers themselves need to embody the fundamental principles of intercultural competence in their everyday teaching practice. ...
... The teenage years are a time when questions of identity and social roles assume tremendous importance (de Klerk & Bosch, 1996;Erikson, 1968;Marcia, 1980). As they move from primary to secondary school, adolescents are involved in the process of exploring their available identity options and become highly focused on identity formation in relation to their peers (Garrett, Coupland, & Williams, 2004;Heaven, 1994;Waterman, 1982). Language and communication are an important aspect of this process. ...
... We are not fully informed why different island societies develop distinct language attitudes toward local speech, given that they are all embedded within a deepened interaction between the island and the mainland. This paper instead suggests we should adopt the perspective of "periphery multilingualism" to understand how the language ideologies of an island variety are actively developed in response to the process of peripheralization taking place between the island as the periphery and the mainland as the center (Pietikäinen et al., 2016;Pietikäinen and Kelly-Holmes, 2013). ...
... In situational switching, switches occur when there is a change in the situation in which language users find themselves. Such situational changes coincide with the change in the interlocutor, setting, topic or participants (Coupland & Jaworski, 1997). ...
... Linguistic ethnographers have used micro-analyses of interaction to extend the ethnography into smaller and more focused spaces, drawing analytic attention to small (but consequential) aspects of social practice. In particular, this kind of analysis has shed light on speakers' stylisations, which, like other elements of performance, put the act of speaking on display, opening it up for public scrutiny (Bauman and Briggs 2009;Coupland 2009). The children's stylisations in Teesside put on display important elements of local working-class class culture (and potentially of working-class culture more generally). ...
Reference: Social Class
... The ideological, sociohistorical, political, and economic factors underpinning different language-standardization experiences in many parts of the world explain why comparative standardology "is a valuable undertaking" (Linn et al. 2018;cf. Deumert and Vandenbussche 2003;Metzeltin 2004;Coupland and Kristiansen 2011;Hüning et al. 2012;Lane et al. 2016;Dollinger 2019;Costa-Carreras and Amorós-Negre 2021) to address both formal and informal aspects of "the construction-and subsequent dissemination-of uniform supradialectal normative [varieties]" (Ferguson 2006, p. 21). In this respect, it is interesting to point to the fact that many ethnolinguistic communities undertook processes of language standardization at very different chronological moments and under diverse sociohistorical and political conditions. ...
... ENDNOTES 1 In the rest of the article I use the terms 'vernacular' and 'standard' to refer to a broad distinction between: (1) local ways of speaking that are regionally and/or socially marked and often stigmatised; and (2) widespread, legitimised, ways of speaking that tend to be considered prestigious. I do so with caution, however, as I accept Coupland's (2009: 285) point that 'we have to be wary of overconsolidating these terms' (see also Coupland 2016). I also maintain the use of scare quotes around 'standard' throughout to align with the perspective that 'standard' English is a sociohistorical construction, not a linguistic fact (Coupland 2000;Crowley 1989;Milroy 1999). ...