Nikki R. Keddie's scientific contributions

Citations

... Shari'ati noted that even in the most technologically advanced society, the 'traditional' in man could never be fully extinguished or over-looked (Sachedina, 1983). By using religion to understand his society Shari'ati disagreed with his teacher, Franz Fanon, who held the view that religion should be abandoned in order to be ideologically equipped to either defeat the imperialistic powers or launch a revolution against their government (Keddie, 1981). On the contrary, he sought to use an already-established "ideology" in the Islamic world in order to create the necessary political apparatus to achieve the same revolutionary end. ...
... The long-and short-term outcomes of this revolution have been extensively debated, but it did result in partially breaking the centuries-old stranglehold of the landed elite, and many of these walled, mud-brick villages were abandoned at the time of the White Revolution or shortly afterwards. Landlord villages and the "feudal" form of land tenure and social organization they represent have been studied and reported in a range of historical and ethnographic accounts from many different geographical areas of Iran (e.g., English 1966;Hooglund 1982;Keddie 1980;Lambton 1953), and it is clear that they underpinned the Iranian way of life for many centuries (Bausani 1962;Garthwaite 2005). However, even within texts devoted to exploring and understanding rural history and the roles of those owning and those working the land, farmers (more usually designated "peasants") remain an amorphous, ahistorical mass, who were subject entirely to the will of the landlord and lived in extreme poverty (e.g., English 1966;Hooglund 1982;Keddie 1980;Lambton 1953). ...