Nikita S. Kalluri's research while affiliated with Harvard Medical School and other places

Publications (5)

Article
Full-text available
Objective To examine associations of maternal primary language with neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) outcomes (mother’s milk at discharge, necrotizing enterocolitis [NEC], late-onset sepsis, weight gain) Design We performed a retrospective cohort study of mother-infant dyads (<34 weeks’ gestation) in 9 NICUs (1/2016-12/2019), examining associat...
Article
Objectives: The impact of household language on Latino-White and Latino intragroup disparities in child health and having a medical home in the US is poorly understood. This study aimed to examine these disparities (1) between Whites and Latinos (overall and stratified by English-primary-language [EPL] and non-English-primary-language [NEPL] house...
Article
Pediatricians have long recognized that social determinants (the circumstances in which children live, learn, and play) influence the health and well-being of children and their families. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has highlighted the importance of this broader scope of health care, which encompasses more than simply addressin...
Article
Full-text available
Mother's milk is recommended for preterm infants due to numerous health benefits. At our inner-city hospital, >80% of mothers of infants younger than 34 weeks' gestation initiated milk production, but fewer continued until discharge. Among infants younger than 34 weeks' gestation, we aimed to (1) increase any mother's milk use in the 24 hours befor...
Article
Background: Compared with non-Hispanic white, Hispanic and non-Hispanic black mothers of very preterm infants are less likely to provide mother's milk at the point of hospital discharge; the perspectives of these mothers are poorly understood. Objectives: To examine the perceived barriers and facilitators of providing milk for very preterm infan...

Citations

... In addition to their regular employment, women were more likely to be tasked with the at-home education and care of children [33,34]. While many employed women left their jobs to cope with these added pressures [35,36], nationwide, women were also more likely to be laid off or underemployed during the pandemic [25]. This loss of income may have increased material hardships experienced by the family as a whole while adding to demands on women's time. ...
... We conducted a retrospective cohort study by performing secondary analysis of data collected in the Human Milk Quality Improvement Collaborative focused on infants <34 weeks' gestation coordinated by Massachusetts Neonatal Quality Improvement Collaborative (NeoQIC) from 2015 to 2019. In this collaborative, multidisciplinary local hospital teams at nine NICUs with level III birth centers collected data regarding demographic variables, breastfeeding measures, and NICU morbidities from medical records [12,22]. For this analysis, we included infants <34 weeks' gestation born from 1/2016 to 12/2019 with known maternal language. ...
... At the community level participants consistently mentioned that assistance in the form of education, resources, or actual technical help should be readily accessible and available. Research confirms these suggestions that mothers need continuity in care using a multi systems approach to address social and personal barriers to breastfeeding (Gross et al., 2017;Johnson et al., 2015;Parker et al., 2018). ...