Nicole Land's research while affiliated with University of Toronto and other places

Publications (24)

Article
Background Beginning with a proposition that physical education (PE) and early childhood education (ECE) build affinities through shared developmental interests, this article works the gaps made possible when PE meets with ECE in unfamiliar ways. Through a shared investment in the normalizing and minoritizing functions of child development, how and...
Article
Taking up the contention that child development manifests through the developmental logics it enacts, the authors work with citational practices as iterations of how developmentalism's logics are done in everyday practices in early childhood and teacher education. They work with Erica Burman's method of ‘found childhood’ to propose citational pract...
Article
This article takes up a question of how early childhood studies and kinesiology might undertake interdisciplinarity together. Working with the provocation of the phrase ‘movement belongs to all of us’, this article probes the character of three particular interdisciplinary alliances between early childhood studies and kinesiology, asking what becom...
Article
Drawing on public writing from a pedagogical inquiry research project collaboration between three early childhood educators, a pedagogist-researcher, and preschool-aged children, this article debates how pedagogical inquiry research becomes “hard work.” Against the backdrop of mainstream early childhood education in the lands currently known as Can...
Article
This article debates how muscles happen in early childhood education. Drawing on post-developmental pedagogies and feminist science studies, this article integrates moments from a pedagogical inquiry with movement in early childhood education to trace how muscles matter as complex and active ethical, political, and pedagogical concerns. After elabo...
Article
We share moments from ongoing pedagogical inquiry work with toddler-aged children, where we explore together how we might tentatively create conditions for movement to happen outside of the familiar, dominant, status-quo referents of individualism and motor skill development that anchor much physical activity curricula. Sharing pedagogical document...
Article
The authors propose decentering the child as a critical motion in the education of pedagogists who work to refuse developmental pedagogies in early childhood education. Tracing how child-centered developmental practices are obstacles for deeper ethical and intellectual work and reiterate anthropocentric relationalities, they offer two propositions...
Article
This article focuses on the speculative practice of “study” in relation to movement pedagogies in early childhood physical education. Bringing the concept in conversation with movement pedagogies, we work to unsettle universalized approaches to early childhood physical education. We orient toward movement pedagogies that refuse the structures of pe...
Article
This article investigates how particular conceptions of physical development (PD) are enacted in early childhood studies in Toronto, Canada. Following critical childhood studies scholars who emphasize the urgency of re-formulating relationships with taken-for-granted concepts in the field, we argue for a practice of noticing, tracing, naming, and q...
Article
This article responds to Euro-western conceptions of childhood obesity that understand fat within developmental narratives, as biochemically consequential and as a marker of individualized responsibility. Drawing in multiple fat(s) generated in a pedagogical inquiry with early childhood educators and children, the author articulates ‘post-developme...
Article
Working with stories of children’s relationships with place and technologies from an early childhood education pedagogical inquiry research project in Melbourne, Australia and Victoria, Canada, this article takes up the concept of “pedagogical intentions” to consider how educators and researchers might cultivate intentional teaching practices relev...
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This article enacts our ongoing collaborative experiments utilizing “iMessaging” on iPhone as a practice of critical relationality toward building our Indigenous-settler millennial academic friendship. Holding written text alongside our iMessage conversations, we confront three threads that continually interject in our exchanges: (1) what happens w...
Article
Full-text available
Children, educators, and researchers at a child care center in Victoria, Canada and Melbourne, Australia have been collaborating on an early childhood education pedagogical inquiry project that grapples with children’s relations with place and technologies. Resisting narratives of environmental stewardship and instrumental digital education that do...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, the authors respond to emerging articulations of the work of a pedagogist or pedagogical facilitator in early childhood education in Canada. This article is grounded in two intentions: we (1) share the tentative pedagogical conversations that we have as pedagogists who centre particular concerns, interests, and accountabilities; an...
Article
Beginning from the proposition that doing transdisciplinary child and youth care (CYC) entails an ethic of risk and vulnerability, four graduate students from differing social, spiritual, bodied, and academic locations trace how our research and professional projects encounter, challenge, support, and disrupt one another. Thinking through two conce...
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Full-text available
Amid the contemporary Euro-Western ‘obesity apparatus,’ fat matters in complex, entangled, and consequential modes that enact uneven oppressive consequences for different bodies. Responding to the myriad ways that fat becomes subsumed within the obesity apparatus—which constrains possibilities for inventive engagements with fat(s)—a recent plethora...
Article
Full-text available
div class="page" title="Page 1"> Drawing on an inquiry-based project focused on experimenting with movement in Canadian early childhood education, this article imagines how educators might think (with) movement pedagogically. The authors detail our practices of pedagogical inquiry, confront contemporary movement-related policies and pedagogies in...
Chapter
Educator, youth, guardian, animal, counsellor, toddler, best friend, coach, and bully—bodies and embodiments assemble, congeal, and explode as the emergent and contingent matters of being and thinking with young people collide with the stringent, evidence-based rational dictates of the predominant Eurowestern machinery by which we are often taught...
Article
In Canada, forces such as the media, medical discourse, and public policy work to position childhood obesity as increased body fat content or excess adiposity due to various personal, social, and economic factors. Drawing on Barad’s ‘agential realist ontology’, this article aims to inhabit-with obesity in an effort to disrupt dominant understanding...

Citations

... Rather, the developmental frameworks students are expected to adhere to undermine their attempts to address diversity in their curriculum planning, resulting in simplified, appropriative activities. We see these moments of twitching as failures of the HDLH document and of developmentalism more broadly (Land & Frankowski, 2022). 8 We each took to creative writing in preparation for the salon and to follow these deeper conversations as we thought about the metaphor of the body in Mary Shelly's Frankenstein next to ECE as a body of knowledge. ...
... This orientation interrupts developmental values for children's individual growth and autonomy, two progress-driven narratives that often saturate pedagogical dispositions in early childhood contexts (Land et. al, 2020). These pedagogical foci can be viewed as expressions of modernity's fixation with instrumentality and functionality that separate some humans from environmental vulnerability (Stengers, 2015) and produce subjectivities which sustain neocolonial relations with plastics in Ecuador. In this context, neocolonialism is legitimized through di ...
... We engage with David Kirk's (2009Kirk's ( , 2010Kirk's ( , 2012 claim of three possible futures for PE that includes 'more of the same', 'radical reform', and 'extinction', to contribute to conversations in PE about the role of physical literacy (PL) to (re)vitalise and (re)form movement pedagogies in the field (Lyngstad & Saether, 2021;Roetert & MacDonald, 2015;Whitehead, 2013). Exploring the relationship between specific practices and how these beget specific concepts with specific possibilities (Land & Vidotto, 2021), our purpose in this article is to extend Margaret Whitehead's PL beyond ethics of responsibility for physical activity (PA) across the lifecourse (Whitehead, 2010(Whitehead, , 2019, to practices of response-ability (Haraway, 2016) to moment-tomoment movement encounters. The end goal here is to open PE to a transformative educational situation that generates the conditions of possibility for a worldly (re)enchantment (Quennerstedt, 2019). ...
... I am busy jumping into the ruptures created by settler colonial either/or binary divisions. I am busy falling into the fissures that erupt when Indigenous knowledges collide with white Euro-Western hegemony (Coon & Land, 2019;Land, Gulamhusein, Scott & Coon, 2018;Coon, 2015). And even though we've been pushed to the margins, exist at the outer limits of colonialism, and our bodies-communities-lands are sites of rupture, we've turned those fractured places into ceremony anyways. ...
... Inspired by the Foucauldian notion of biopower, they began interrogating the ways in which we come to internalize 'healthism' and learn to become 'good' citizens who adhere to a thin and able ideal (Cameron et al., 2014;Evans & Rich, 2011;Fitzpatrick & Tinning, 2014;Harwood, 2009;Leahy 2009;Petherick & Beausoleil, 2015;Rail & Jette, 2015;Wright & Harwood 2009). Others, inspired by feminist new materialisms, have discussed 'body-becoming' in relation to the building of fat identity and the ensuing need to complexify our understandings of experiencing fatness (Land, 2015(Land, , 2018Land & Montpetit, 2018;McPhail, Brady, & Gingras, 2017;Rice, 2015). Common to discussions of both biopedagogies and bodybecoming is the constitutive role of formal and informal learning. ...
... To focus our discussion, we limit the selection of studies to those with ethnographic methodologies, as this may afford more comparability across studies. Our selection of key studies for this chapter comes from a mapping of the theoretical frameworks of, to our knowledge, all peer-reviewed journal articles from the past four years in the field of ethnographic observation studies on digital early childhoods, from which a total of five articles have been categorised as having sociomaterial theoretical frameworks (Gillen & Kucirkova, 2018;Land et al., 2019;Lundtofte et al., 2019;Marsh, 2017). The limited number of studies affords a closer view of their contribution of sociomaterial theories to the research field. ...
... I am busy jumping into the ruptures created by settler colonial either/or binary divisions. I am busy falling into the fissures that erupt when Indigenous knowledges collide with white Euro-Western hegemony (Coon & Land, 2019;Land, Gulamhusein, Scott & Coon, 2018;Coon, 2015). And even though we've been pushed to the margins, exist at the outer limits of colonialism, and our bodies-communities-lands are sites of rupture, we've turned those fractured places into ceremony anyways. ...
... As Janet Lyon suggests, historically manifestoes and related forms appear most often in clusters around political crises that involve definitions of citizenship and political subjecthood (1999, p. 16). It can be argued that the last 15-20 years has been such a time for young women, and particularly Indigenous young women, who are working to re-define and expand notions of girlhood, to gain social and political recognition as Indigenous people as well as democratic rights, long afforded to others (DeFinney et al., 2018). It is therefore important to take a brief look at the manifesto as a political document to understand more about how the Girlfesto may be used. ...
... Aligning with urgent calls from PE scholars that assert different ways of knowing/being/thinking/doing/feeling in PE are necessary if we are to facilitate affirmative movement encounters for diverse children (Fitzpatrick, 2019;Kirk, 2009;Powell & Fitzpatrick, 2015;Quennerstedt, 2019;Welch et al., 2021), in this article we focus on the ethics and politics of children's bodies and movement (e.g. Azzarito, 2009Azzarito, , 2010Azzarito et al., 2006;Land & Danis, 2016;Sanderud et al., 2020;Sperka & Enright, 2019). We engage with David Kirk's (2009Kirk's ( , 2010Kirk's ( , 2012 claim of three possible futures for PE that includes 'more of the same', 'radical reform', and 'extinction', to contribute to conversations in PE about the role of physical literacy (PL) to (re)vitalise and (re)form movement pedagogies in the field (Lyngstad & Saether, 2021;Roetert & MacDonald, 2015;Whitehead, 2013). ...
... We are told through media, advertising, public health campaigns, and by many health professionals that the cause of fatness is simple: too many calories 'in' through food and drink and not enough calories 'out' through activity leads to weight gain. Yet contemporary weight science has complexified our understandings of body weight, pointing to other factors that may also be at play such as genetics, gut microbiome, and social and environmental determinants (Bombak, 2014;Ellison, McPhail, & Mitchinson, 2016;Land, 2018;Lupton, 2013;Medvedyuk, Ali, & Raphael, 2018;Rich, Monaghan, & Aphramor, 2010;Rothblum, 2018). Also contested is the use of the BMI (Body Mass Index) as a proxy measure of fitness and health given it is merely a simple ratio of height and weight that cannot account for myriad other factors such as fat distribution, body composition, and cardiorespiratory fitness (Anderson, 2012;Campos, 2004;Guthman, 2013). ...