Nicole F. Dufour's research while affiliated with NASA and other places

Publications (4)

Article
Full-text available
The establishment of steady-state continuous crop production during long-term deep space missions is critical for providing consistent nutritional and psychological benefits for the crew, potentially improving their health and performance. Three technology demonstrations were completed achieving simultaneous multi-species plant growth and the concu...
Article
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The Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) is the largest research plant growth facility deployed on the International Space Station (ISS). APH is a fully enclosed, closed-loop plant life support system with an environmentally controlled growth chamber designed for conducting both fundamental and applied plant research during experiments extending as long as...
Article
Full-text available
The Veggie vegetable production system was launched to the International Space Station with three sets of test plants for an initial hardware validation test, designated VEG-01. VEG-01A and B featured the crop ‘Outredgeous’ red romaine lettuce, while VEG-01C tested ‘Profusion’ zinnia plants for longer duration growth and flowering characteristics....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The NASA Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) is configured as a quad-locker payload to be mounted in a standard EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to the Space Station Rack on the International Space Station. It is envisioned to be the largest plant growth chamber yet to be developed for ISS. The APH is designed to support commercial and fundamental p...

Citations

... In the mid-1990s, the Astroculture experiment was a prototype tested aboard the STS 60 and STS 62 missions as part of the Shuttle/Mir program, with temperature control capabilities of ±2°C and within 5% relative humidity of 50%-90%, nutrients, and air revitalization [10]. Nowadays, more advanced systems [11] aboard the ISS such as the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH), like Veggie, can control and monitor temperature, humidity, air revitalization, nutrients, water recovery and distribution and different types of lights. The growth chamber of the APH environmental control system on the ISS controls the temperature from about 18°C -30°C (±1°C) and relative humidity of 50%-90% (±5%). ...
... Plant space biology has greatly benefited from this unprecedented facility. All space agencies participating in ISS (NASA, ESA, JAXA, CSA, and Roskosmos) have contributed with relevant experiments to increase our knowledge on the alterations induced in plants by exposure to the space environment and on the adaptive response of these organisms [7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17]. However, in recent times, agencies are progressively refocusing their future activities from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) space to the Moon and beyond. ...
... For light and CO 2 , both Veggie and APH use red, blue, and green LEDs and fan-mediated ambient cabin air, respectively, though APH can be more precisely controlled (Massa et al. 2016). Veggie is the first to allow astronauts to consume the space crop harvest, passing the NASA microbiological standards (Massa et al. 2017). It must be noted that these systems are aided and serviced by resupply missions. ...