Nick D'Adamo's research while affiliated with Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) and other places

Publications (10)

Book
Full-text available
The 78th edition of CLIVAR Exchanges focuses on the recent decadal review of the Indian Ocean Observing System (IndOOS) and its outcomes.
Article
Full-text available
The Indian Ocean is warming faster than any of the global oceans and its climate is uniquely driven by the presence of a landmass at low latitudes, which causes monsoonal winds and reversing currents. The food, water, and energy security in the Indian Ocean rim countries and islands are intrinsically tied to its climate, with marine environmental g...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reviews the northern sources of the Leeuwin Current and related circulation on the North West Shelf, north of where it consolidates into its well-known poleward boundary current structure off North West Cape, Australia. This review finds that relatively warm, low salinity waters enter the Indonesian-Australian Basin through two major rem...
Article
Full-text available
This review provides an oceanographic background for the biological field surveys of the Dampier Archipelago undertaken in July/August 2000. It attempts to summarise the main oceanographic processes affecting the waters of the Archipelago in the context of the wider North West Shelf, using both the published literature and previously unpublished da...

Citations

... Currently, the Indian Ocean (IO) has shown warming faster than the rest of the global ocean in response to anthropogenic climate change (Beal et al., 2020;Roxy et al., 2016). Reductions in marine primary productivity in the western IO were observed and projected (Boyce et al., 2010;Roxy et al., 2016;Xu et al., 2021); however, more uncertainties exist in the projected change in the eastern IO and BoB (Beal et al., 2020;Hermes et al., 2019;Xu et al., 2021). The observed near-surface circulations in the equatorial IO and in the AS and BoB manifest themselves primarily through Ekman and geostrophic adjustments, and respond rapidly to seasonal changes in the monsoonal surface wind and buoyancy forcing (Rao et al., 2010;Schott & McCreary, 2001;Schott et al., 2009). ...
... The recommended plan Phase 1 could benefit by being partially implemented in association with YMC or under the international IIOE-2 program. Our recommendations address many IIOE-2 priority research areas identified in Theme 4: Circulation climate variability and change (Hood et al., 2015). Real success will rely on a closely integrated modeling and observational plan. ...
... The ITF also passes into the Indian Ocean through Lombok, Ombai, and Timor straits (Sprintall & Révelard, 2014). The passage through Timor starts with the HC, which is regarded as the northernmost limb of the poleward flowing LC (D'Adamo et al., 2009). The LC is a relatively low-salinity warm current that derives its waters from the ITF and the Eastern Gyral Current (EGC). ...
... In winter, the dry easterly and south-easterly winds drive shelf waters towards the west, and in summer winds tend to drive shelf waters gently eastwards. Cyclones can force fast unidirectional currents on the shelf (Pearce et al., 2003) with 17 m high ocean waves and surface ocean currents exceeding 3 m/s (Condie et al., 2006). Over periods of decades and centuries, the fastest cyclone-driven flows are towards the SW, in the same direction as along-shelf sediment transport (Larcombe et al., 2014(Larcombe et al., , 2018Dufois et al., 2017). ...
... RAMA-The Research Moored Array for African-Asian-Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction-was originally designed by the CLIVAR/GOOS Indian Ocean Region Panel (IORP) to address fundamental questions related to the ocean's role in monsoon dynamics. RAMA was established in 2004 as the moored buoy component of the IndOOS (Masumoto et al., 2010). It is the Indian Ocean complement to the TAO/TRITON array in the Pacific and the PIRATA array in the Atlantic Ocean, which together comprise the Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array Program . ...