Nicholas A. Coles's research while affiliated with Harvard University and other places

Publications (12)

Article
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Psychological Science Accelerator coordinated three large-scale psychological studies to examine the effects of loss-gain framing, cognitive reappraisals, and autonomy framing manipulations on behavioral intentions and affective measures. The data collected (April to October 2020) included specific measures...
Preprint
The recent proliferation of big team science is forcing researchers to revisit three issues around authorship: (1) What is an authorship-worthy contribution, (2) How should contributions be documented, and (3) How should disagreements among large teams of co-authors be handled?
Preprint
The Funding and Finance Committee serves as an advisory board for the PSA’s Director and Associate Directors on all matters related to finance and funding. The Funding and Finance Committee will work with the PSA’s Director and Associate Directors (hereafter “the PSA Board”) to propose and manage the PSA’s annual operating budget, provide guidance...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic (and its aftermath) highlights a critical need to communicate health information effectively to the global public. Given that subtle differences in information framing can have meaningful effects on behavior, behavioral science research highlights a pressing question: Is it more effective to frame COVID-19 health messages in t...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has increased negative emotions and decreased positive emotions globally. Left unchecked, these emotional changes might have a wide array of adverse impacts. To reduce negative emotions and increase positive emotions, we tested the effectiveness of reappraisal, an emotion-regulation strategy that modifies how one thinks about...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Communicating in ways that motivate engagement in social distancing remains a critical global public health priority during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study tested motivational qualities of messages about social distancing (those that promoted choice and agency vs. those that were forceful and shaming) in 25,718 people in 89 countries...
Article
Researchers are creating grass-roots collaborative networks to tackle difficult questions in primate studies and more, but they need funding and other support. Researchers are creating grass-roots collaborative networks to tackle difficult questions in primate studies and more, but they need funding and other support.
Preprint
Full-text available
Semantic priming has been studied for nearly 50 years across various experimental manipulations and theoretical frameworks. These studies provide evidence of cognitive underpinnings of the structure and organization of semantic representation in both healthy and clinical populations. In this registered report, we propose to create a large database...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has increased negative emotions and decreased positive emotions globally. Left unchecked, these emotional changes might have a wide array of adverse impacts. To reduce negative emotions and increase positive emotions, we tested the effectiveness of reappraisal, an emotion-regulation strategy that modifies how one thinks about...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has increased negative emotions and decreased positive emotions globally. Left unchecked, these emotional changes might have a wide array of adverse impacts. To reduce negative emotions and increase positive emotions, we tested the effectiveness of reappraisal, an emotion-regulation strategy that modifies how one thinks about...
Preprint
Full-text available
One key motivating force for bonding across animals is their need to regulate body temperature, also called social thermoregulation. This phenomenon has been extensively documented in animals, but only recently its existence has been suggested in humans. Psychology, however, has been faced with conflicting findings and the social thermoregulation l...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past 10 years, Oosterhof and Todorov’s valence–dominance model has emerged as the most prominent account of how people evaluate faces on social dimensions. In this model, two dimensions (valence and dominance) underpin social judgements of faces. Because this model has primarily been developed and tested in Western regions, it is unclear w...

Citations

... Speakers' verbal expressions also have an impact on listeners' emotions. A large-scale study found that COVID-19 messages that were framed in terms of losses (vs gains) increased anxiety (Dorison et al., 2022). ...
... Moreover, the quality of studies on fear appeals in promoting health-oriented behaviours has been criticized due to a lack of research that would capture behavioural change, which limits our understanding of the causal relationship between fear appeal and behaviour (Kok et al., 2018). Especially in the context of the pandemic, the existing evidence is limited to individual countries, employing cross-sectional design, and not distinguishing interand intra-individual changes (c.f., Legate et al., 2022). In conclusion, it remains unclear whether the fear of a virus predicts behaviours that should limit virus transmission, crucially on the intra-individual level. ...
... Coping via cognitive restructuring (e.g., "looking at the positive side of things") during the lockdown period in 2020 was longitudinally associated with less severe anxiety symptoms, and cross-sectionally in 2021 with less severe depression symptoms, in line with literature documenting this as a fruitful coping behavior [13,19,56], with cognitive restructuring being an integral part of psychotherapy for anxiety and depression [57,58], and with a large international study conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a re-appraisal intervention among adults during the COVID-19 pandemic [59] that found that a simple intervention that encouraged participants to refocus "on whatever good aspects may be found in a situation" reduced negative emotions and increased positive emotions. It is likely that the cognitive restructuring style of coping is particularly important during the COVID-19 pandemic, since an individual's ability to influence the pandemic itself is limited. ...
... What makes this trend worrisome is the fact that the matter of authorship unfolds sharp gender inequalities in the scientific community, where female authors are arranged with more co-first (rather than the first) authors relative to what is applicable to male authors (Fleming, 2021). Furthermore, the scrambling for privileged positions in authorship arrangements is increasingly forcing early career researchers to distance themselves from scientific works and big-science collaborations, especially neuroscientists (Yager, 2007;Coles et al., 2022). Under the current scientific incentive system, it is an intuition that the credits a study can deliver for an author can be likened to the commercial values of a building, with the front location (position) indicating a high price (credit). ...
... Also, future studies should examine whether emotion dysregulation might play a significant role in specific contexts where conspiracy beliefs have been consequential, such as for the COVID-19 pandemic (Douglas, 2021a;Kowalski et al., 2020;Łowicki et al., 2022;Sternisko et al., 2021). This potential study appears to be even more important in the light of recent research (Wang et al., 2021), indicating that an adaptive emotion regulation strategy (i.e., reappraisal) reduced negative emotions regarding the COVID-19 pandemic. ...
... We also would like to point to Living Systematic Reviews (Elliott et al., 2014), which, as far as we can judge, are conceptually equivalent to CAMAs and were developed in parallel. In what follows, we continue using the name CAMA as this is the name under which we had proposed this idea, which has been picked up by others in the cognitive sciences (Bosnjak, 2020;Burgard, Bosnjak, & Studtrucker, 2021;Ijzerman et al., 2021). Step 0: Consider educational opportunities. ...
... Consistent with a learning account, there are systematic cultural differences in first impressions (Chen, Jing, Lee, & Bai, 2016;Jones et al., 2021;Lakshmi, Wittenbrink, Correll, & Ma, 2021;Over, Eggleston, & Cook, 2020a;Sofer et al., 2017;Sutherland et al., 2018;Walker, Jiang, Vetter, & Sczesny, 2011;Zebrowitz et al., 2012). For example, in so-called WEIRD cultures (Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, Democratic), straight white teeth are associated with attractiveness, social status, and a host of other positive characteristics (Dion et al., 1972;Eagly et al., 1991). ...