Neil A. Davis's research while affiliated with University of British Columbia - Vancouver and other places

Publications (4)

Article
Management agencies increasingly seek to broaden stakeholder participation in fisheries decision making beyond commercial fisheries groups. This precipitates the challenge of meaningfully involving additional stakeholders without unjustifiably diminishing the role of commercial users. This research examines participants'; evaluations of one attempt...
Article
Governing agencies increasingly employ collaborative forms of decision-making in fisheries management to improve decision quality and legitimacy. However, crafting fair and effective collaborative processes that will achieve these benefits is often difficult. In an effort to identify keys and obstacles to success, this research examined participant...
Chapter
Full-text available
During this inventory, the study area properties – the Department of National Defence property (DND), Richmond Nature Park (RNP west) and Richmond Nature Study Area (RNP east) – were inventoried for the presence of reptiles and amphibians. Until now, there has not been any systematic study of reptile and amphibian species in the Lulu Island Bog. Be...
Article
Climate change threatens the ability of marine protected areas to deliver intended biodiversity and resource conservation outcomes. In light of this, should governments and stakeholders pursue their creation? This paper reviews the implications of climate change for marine ecosystems and suggests that marine protected areas can serve several import...

Citations

... Fisheries management is seen by some as a wicked problem [3,4] because interactions within and among the social, economic, and ecological systems are highly complex, nonlinear and therefore deemed unsolvable. However, there is evidence that the complexities of management can be addressed through, amongst other things, direct involvement of stakeholders in the management process [5,6] and the application of the adaptive management loop (or learning by doing) [7]. ...
... erefore, a higher degree of knowledge and function integration is required for the future development of decision support tools. In addition, there are also many decision-making practices in marine management such as dealing with oil spill contingency [17,18], fishery management planning [19][20][21][22], marine zoning decisions [23,24], and nature conservation [25][26][27]. Obviously, different decision-making tools are used, developed and integrated for marine management goals. ...