Neela B. Manley's research while affiliated with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and other places

Publications (15)

Article
Full-text available
The Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) is a systematic and unifying resource that standardizes the results of chronic, long-term animal cancer tests which have been conducted since the 1950s. The analyses include sufficient information on each experiment to permit research into many areas of carcinogenesis. Both qualitative and quantitative infor...
Article
Full-text available
Public policy with respect to pesticides has relied on the results of high-dose, rodent cancer tests as the major source of information for assessing potential cancer risks to humans. This chapter critically examines the assumptions, methodology, results, and implications of cancer risk assessments of pesticide residues in the diet. The analyses pr...
Article
Full-text available
A compendium of carcinogenesis bioassay results organized by target organ is presented for 738 chemicals that are carcinogenic in chronic-exposure, long-term bioassays in at least 1 species. This compendium is based primarily on experiments in rats or mice; results in hamsters, monkeys, and dogs are also reported. The compendium can be used to iden...
Article
The Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) is a systematic and unifying analysis of results of chronic, long-term cancer tests. This paper presents a supplemental plot of the CPDB, including 513 experiments on 157 test compounds published in the general literature in 1993 and 1994 and in Technical Reports of the National Toxicology Program in 1995 an...
Article
Much of the public perceives that exposure to synthetic pesticide residues in the diet is a major cause of cancer. The National Research Council (NRC), in a 1987 report, Regulating Pesticides in Food: The Delaney Paradox, evaluated cancer risks for 29 pesticides that are rodent carcinogens and estimated that the risks for 23 were greater than one-i...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents two types of information from the Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB): (a) the sixth chronological plot of analyses of long-term carcinogenesis bioassays, and (b) an index to chemicals in all six plots, including a summary compendium of positivity and potency for each chemical (Appendix 14). The five earlier plots of the CPDB h...
Article
Results in the Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) on 11 mutagenic heterocyclic amines (HA) tested for carcinogenicity in rats, mice and cynomolgus monkeys are compared to results for other chemicals. An analysis of strength of evidence of carcinogenicity for HA vs. other mutagenic carcinogens and vs. all rodent carcinogens, indicates strong carci...
Article
Full-text available
This paper is the fifth plot of the Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) that first appeared in this journal in 1984 (1-5). We report here results of carcinogenesis bioassays published in the general literature between January 1987 and December 1988, and in technical reports of the National Toxicology Program between July 1987 and December 1989. Th...
Article
Prediction of human cancer risk from the results of rodent bioassays requires two types of extrapolation: a qualitative extrapolation from short-lived rodent species to long-lived humans, and a quantitative extrapolation from near-toxic doses in the bioassay to low-level human exposures. Experimental evidence on the accuracy of prediction between c...
Article
Full-text available
The human diet contains an enormous background of natural chemicals, such as plant pesticides and the products of cooking, that have not been a focus of carcinogenicity testing. A broadened perspective that includes these natural chemicals is necessary. A comparison of possible hazards for 80 daily exposures to rodent carcinogens from a variety of...
Article
Full-text available
The Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) is an easily accessible, standardized resource of positive and negative long-term animal cancer tests. The CPDB has been published in four earlier papers that include results for approximately 4000 experiments on 1050 chemicals. This paper describes the CPDB: goals, inclusion criteria, fields of information,...
Article
Full-text available
A compendium of carcinogenesis bioassay results organized by target organ is presented for 533 chemicals that are carcinogenic in at least one species. This compendium is based primarily on experiments in rats or mice; results in hamsters, nonhuman primates, and dogs are also reported. The compendium can be used to identify chemicals that induce tu...
Article
Full-text available
This paper is the third chronological supplement to the Carcinogenic Potency Database that first appeared in this journal in 1984. We report here results of carcinogenesis bioassays published in the general literature between January 1985 and December 1986, and in Technical Reports of the National Toxicology Program between June 1986 and June 1987....

Citations

... Some chronic diseases are due to the effects of pesticides (Tago et al., 2014), as a result of: (i) direct exposure to farmers, (ii) indirect exposure to members of a farming community, and (iii) consumption of pesticide residues in food, water, fish, and herbal preparations (Gold et al., 2001;W. J. Ntow et al., 2008b;. ...
... Antioxidant compounds have been shown to slow down the development of chemically induced tumors (5)(6)(7)(8). It has been estimated that the most of human cancer cases are due to environmental factors and would be preventable if the main risks could be identified (9,10). The role of diet is important and a number of studies have suggested that absence of certain dietary compounds, notably antioxidants, contribute to increasing the risk of malignancy (11)(12)(13)(14). ...
... Obviously, the target species is directly relevant, obviating the need for inter-species extrapolations. Further, when exposure concentrations in the target human study population are known, risk assessors can avoid the use of high-to-low dose extrapolations required for most laboratory animal studies [3,4]. Human data are also valuable in cases where appropriate laboratory animal models are unavailable or of limited relevance [5]. ...
... The inhibition of this enzyme leads to the increased concentration of acetylcholine in the nerves which obtrude muscular movements and working of the organs and sometimes result in death (Chapalamadugu and Chaudhry 1992;Donarski et al. 1989). In addition, pesticides also affect the human liver, red blood cells (RBCs), endocrine system, immune system, and reproduction system (Farag et al. 2010;Fendick et al. 1990;Gold et al. 1991;Rawlings et al. 1998;Suwalsky et al. 2005), and few are known to be carcinogens and mutagens (De Flora et al. 1993). Some pesticides also get transmitted from the mother to the child via breastfeeding (Muñoz-de-Toro et al. 2006). ...
... The sensitivity/specificity of genotoxicity tests was assessed in many studies on the basis of results that were obtained in long-term carcinogenicity studies with rodents. The chemicals were often selected from data collections for example from the "Carcinogenic Potency Database" of Gold et al. [5]. This collection is a compilation results for 1547 chemicals from 6540 cancer bioassays, from the National Toxicology Program (NTP) and from Monographs of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) which uses different categories: (Group 1: "Carcinogenic to humans", Group 2A: "Probably carcinogenic to humans", Group 2B: "Possibly carcinogenic to humans", Group 3: "Unclassifiable as to carcinogenicity in humans" and Group 4: "Probably not carcinogenic to humans"). ...
... 56,57 As most natural plant pesticides are not commercial products, relatively few of the more than 10,000 identified have been tested for carcinogenic potential. [58][59][60][61][62] Ames et al. 6 noted that up through 1990, 1052 chemicals had been tested in at least one species in chronic cancer tests. Of the 1052 chemicals, 52 were natural plant pesticides. ...
... Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) are compounds that form naturally in muscle meats when exposed to heat during the cooking process (Sugimura 1997). Known for their potent mutagenic response on the Ames/Salmonella test (Ames et al. 1975) and in Chinese hamster ovary cells (Wu et al. 1997), HAA also have been linked to cancer in laboratory rodents and primates (Gold et al. 1994; Snyderwine et al. 1997; Nagao et al. 2002; Nakagama et al. 2002). The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recently listed three HAA, MeIQ, MeIQx, and PhIP, as " reasonably anticipated to be human carcinogens " based on a body of evidence from in vivo studies and human epidemiological data (NIEHS 2005). ...
... We previously reported SAR models for rats and mice derived from CASE/MultiCASE analyses of the first five plots of the Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) [26][27][28][29][30][31][32][33]. The CPDB is an internationally recognized public resource that has analyzed and consolidated 6540 long-term animal cancer bioassays performed on 1547 different chemicals from general literature as well as by the NCI/NTP. ...
... RfD is an estimate of daily exposure to the human population that will likely be without an adverse effect (Smith, 1996). SF connect with the exposure the probability of causing carcinogenic effects (Gold et al., 1995;Peña-Fernández et al., 2014). Exposure of humans to PTE in urban soils can occur via direct and indirect oral ingestion and inhalation of resuspended soil particulates (Peña-Fernández et al., 2014). ...
... Tomato industry is in danger of deterioration due to effect by T. absoluta if not controlled. Several authors [87][88][89][90][91][92][93][94][95][96][97][98][99] have consistently reported that, no effective control including use of chemicals is available for farmers. Parolin et al. [100] furthermore reported that without any practical solution to farmers, growers will lose all benefits that could be earned from tomato production. ...