Natasha Parent's research while affiliated with University of British Columbia - Vancouver and other places

Publications (12)

Article
Full-text available
University students are consistently ranked among the highest users of smartphones. As such, recent research has focused on examining the antecedents and consequences of problematic smartphone use among university students. While this work has been instrumental to our understanding of the risk and protective factors of developing problematic smartp...
Article
Full-text available
As the COVID-19 global pandemic limited face-to-face social contact, mental health concerns increased for adolescents. Additionally, many adolescents turned to technology to communicate with their peers, which also raised concerns about adolescent smartphone addiction. However, research has yet to examine how mental health and technology engagement...
Article
This mixed-methods study explored adolescents' (n = 682) feelings of social connection in the time of the COVID-19 pandemic and examined potential risk (fear of missing out, problematic smartphone use) and protective (parent/peer attachment, smartphone use) factors to social disconnection. Data were collected from two schools in Canada using an onl...
Article
Full-text available
Given recent concerns around the conceptualization of problematic smartphone use within a medical-addiction model, the objective of this work is to examine an alternative, adaptive, framework in which to conceptualize young adults’ experiences of problematic smartphone use. Specifically, this work employed an attachment theory lens to understanding...
Article
Despite a growing body of evidence demonstrating that cannabis use is associated with mental illness among sexual and gender minority (SGM) men, little is known about the motivations, patterns and contexts that influence this relationship. Our study aimed to characterize how cannabis use features within the mental health-related experiences of youn...
Article
We present data from a larger longitudinal study, focusing on researchers’ and teachers’ collaborative design and implementation of assessments for learning (AfL), including student self-assessments, to support self-regulated learning (SRL) during classroom writing activities. We focus on students (N = 112) when they were in Grade 3. The study used...
Article
Objectives The goal of this study was to investigate socio-demographic and contextual factors in relation to the frequency of outdoor play in the neighbourhood in early childhood, drawing from a large sample of children in British Columbia, Canada.Methods Parents/caregivers of 2280 4- to 5-year-old children completed the Childhood Experiences Quest...
Article
The objective of this study was to identify how cannabis use features within the sexual lives of young sexual minority men who use substances, and how this might intersect with features of their contemporary socio-cultural contexts in a setting where non-medical cannabis was recently legalised: Vancouver, Canada. Forty-one sexual minority men ages...
Article
With the increasingly ubiquitous use of smartphones in modern culture, particularly among young adults, recent research has focused on the behaviors, characteristics, and effects of smartphone use, with the evaluation of addictive features largely dominating work in this area. Given concerns around the application of the medical‐addiction model to...
Conference Paper
Background Just as sexual health services do not always attend to the substance-related needs of individuals, substance use care tends to neglect sexuality and sexual health. The objective of this study was to identify factors influencing the acceptability of integrating substance use care within sexual health services for young gay, bisexual and o...

Citations

... To avoid solutions based on local maxima, we used 200 random sets of starting values initially and 50 final stage optimizations. Additionally, each latent class was defined with meaningful clinical interpretability [51]. Posterior probabilities from the model were used to assign each participant to their most likely class [18]. ...
... In recent years, with the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, some scholars have begun to explore the formation mechanism of smartphone addiction [32,35], especially the impact of new individual and environmental changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic, for example, the impact of social isolation on smartphone addiction. Some studies have shown that the social isolation status of individuals cannot predict the level of smartphone addiction, and there is no correlation between social isolation and smartphone addiction at the objective level [36]. However, some other studies have shown that social isolation can significantly predict the level of smartphone addiction, and that loneliness at the subjective level of social isolation in undergraduates is a direct predictor of smartphone addiction [37]. ...
... What students lack in distance education is contact with peers (Parent et al., 2021;Rokos & Vančura, 2020). Another disadvantage of forced distance education is the "opening of educational scissors" between children from socioeconomically weaker and stronger families. ...
... In other words, the view on smartphone addiction provides a negativist framing and therefore a one-sided perspective on users' relationship to their smartphones (Melumad & Pham, 2020). Moreover, evidence shows that smartphone attachment determines problematic use behavior such as addiction (Kim & Koh, 2018;Parent et al., 2021). ...
... Mental health concerns also appear to be related to cannabis use among sexual minorities. [12][13][14] Specifically, past research indicates that sexual minorities may be motivated to use cannabis to enhance sex, 11 lower sexual inhibitions, 11 and self-medicate for mental health symptoms. 12,13 Additionally, one study found that higher percentages of sexual minorities have reported using cannabis on the recommendation of a doctor or other health professional (e.g., medical use) compared with heterosexuals. 2 Motivations for using cannabis have been more thoroughly explored in the general population using the Marijuana Motives Measure (MMM), which is a valid and reliable measure of motivations for cannabis use in the general population. ...
... However, complex learning situations also require systematic and targeted support for learners (Reeve & Halusic, 2009). In this respect, Perry and colleagues (Perry et al., 2020a) were able to demonstrate that classrooms in which SRL is highly valued also provide structural support for SRL and the students' autonomy. The macrocategory "Student Influence and Autonomy" refers to the availability of opportunities to co-design lessons and control one's own learning, thus promoting student influence and autonomy. ...
... Family income is also found to be predictive of the frequency of children's outdoor play. Compared with children from low-income families, those from higher-income families are found to have more outdoor play activities [26]. This might be related to the location of the family residence, as children from low-income families usually live in communities with fewer parks, more traffic, and higher crime rates, which limit the possibilities for young children to have outdoor play [27]. ...
... Some specific motivations for using cannabis have been identified among sexual minorities that may help to account for their increased frequency of use. However, much of this research has been qualitative in nature and has focused on sexual motivations for cannabis use, 10,11 with a small number of quantitative studies examining expectancies that reinforce cannabis use. Mental health concerns also appear to be related to cannabis use among sexual minorities. ...
... Various recent studies employ the attachment theory to explore the relationship between peer attachment and problematic smartphone use among young adults [20,21]. The development and strengthening of attachment-related bonds between children and their parents begin during infancy. ...