Nancy A. Denton's research while affiliated with State University of New York and other places

Publications (51)

Article
The American Community Survey (ACS) provides valuable, timely population estimates but with increased levels of sampling error. Although the margin of error is included with aggregate estimates, it has not been incorporated into segregation indexes. With the increasing levels of diversity in small and large places throughout the United States comes...
Article
Full-text available
We investigate the difference that immigrant enclaves make for the residential contexts of Latino families in the U.S. We argue that enclaves may no longer function simply as temporary way stations, the classic depiction of them, because of the compromised legal status of many Latinos. We examine this role with an innovative method that uses public...
Article
The rights that the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) enumerates include the rights to (1) an adequate standard of living, (2) an education directed toward the development of the child’s fullest potential, (3) the highest attainable standard of health, and (4) the child’s own cultural identity and use of his or her own language. The CRC s...
Article
Children must rely on adults to provide the economic and human resources essential to assure their well-being and development, because it is the adults in their families, communities, and the halls of government who determine the nature and magnitude of resources that reach children (e.g., Bronfenbrenner, 1979; Haveman & Wolfe, 1994). In view of th...
Article
By the year 2030, when the baby boom generation born between 1946 and 1964 will be in the retirement ages, 72% of the elderly will be non-Hispanic Whites, compared with 56% for working-age adults, and 50% for children. As the predominantly White baby boomers reach retirement, they will increasingly depend for economic support on the productive acti...
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Full-text available
Children in immigrant families account for nearly one-in-four children in the U.S. They are the fastest grow- ing population of children, and they are leading the nation's racial and ethnic transformation. As a consequence, baby-boomers will depend heavily for economic support during retirement on race-ethnic minorities, many of whom grew up in imm...
Chapter
The Forgotten FactorComing to Terms with American Apartheid
Article
The use of ethnic categories in sociology : a critical, coordinated presentation and debate. Ethnic categories have only gradually come to be used in sociology in France, and the process has been punctuated with acrimonious debate due to how remote such categories are from French intellectual tradition. Use of them has nonetheless attained greater...
Article
This article presents a demographic portrait of young Hispanic children compared to young non-Hispanic Whites. New results from Census 2000 describe family and economic circumstances of children aged 08, as well as pre-K/nursery school and kindergarten enrollment for the United States, and for the 9 states with the largest number of young Hispanic...
Article
In this paper, we use racial data from Census 2000, available for the first time in 50 years, to examine the links among race, socioeconomic status, and residential location on the island of Puerto Rico. Puerto Ricans overwhelmingly chose white as their race, and they chose only one race, not a combination of races that would seem more in keeping w...
Article
This Research Brief draws on new results of Census 2000 data to take a closer look at children in immigrant families, that is, children with at least one foreign-born parent. For example, the brief reports that children in newcomer families are driving the nation's racial and ethnic transformation. Moreover, these children constitute a very diverse...
Article
This chapter presents a demographic portrait of children in immigrant families, that is, children who have at least one foreign-born parent. The focus is on the family circumstances of children because families are important to society; they bear immediate and direct responsibility for rearing children, for creating and nurturing the next generatio...
Article
Abstract ,In this paper we investigate the relationship between race and appreciation in the value of owner- occupied homes with tract-level data for six metropolitan areas. Appreciation in the value of one’s home is important because it is has historically been the primary mechanism for the accumulation of wealth among middle-class Americans. As O...
Article
In this response we correct an error in our earlier description of the RCO index. We also confirm that the index is not bounded on the negative side as we had previously thought, and we discuss the conditions under which its value goes below −1. We consider defining concentration in terms of density rather than area and systematically compare area-...
Article
This article investigates the shifting racial and ethnic composition of neighborhoods in the Greater New York metropolitan region in the 1970-1990 period, during which the region has been one of the nation's major receiving grounds for new immigrant groups. Neighborhoods are defined in terms of census tracts, and changes in neighborhood composition...
Article
This article investigates the shifting racial and ethnic composition of neighborhoods in the Greater New York metropolitan region in the 1970–1990 period, during which the region has been one of the nation's major receiving grounds for new immigrant groups. Neighborhoods are defined in terms of census tracts, and changes in neighborhood composition...
Article
Douglas Massey and Nancy Denton's "American Apartheid" argues that housing integration has inappropriately disappeared from the national agenda and is critical to remedying the problems of the so-called "underclass." Reviewer Olati Johnson praises the authors' refusal to dichotomize race and class and the roles both play in creating and maintaining...
Article
Ethnic diversity within metropolitan neighborhoods increased during the 1970s, and all-white tracts became less common. The simple presence of a minority group did not precipitate turnover, but as the minority proportion rose, the probability of racial and ethnic transition increased. Tracts with multiple groups became much more common during the d...
Article
Residential segregation has traditionally been measured by using the index of dissimilarity and, more recently, the P * exposure index. These indices, however, measure only two of five potential dimensions of segregation and, by themselves, understate the degree of black segregation in U.S. society. Compared with Hispanics, not only are blacks more...
Article
This paper conceives of residential segregation as a multidimensional phenomenon varying along five distinct axes of measurement: evenness, exposure, concentration, centralization, and clustering. Twenty indices of segregation are surveyed and related conceptually to one of the five dimensions. Using data from a large set of U.S. metropolitan areas...
Article
This article examines trends in suburbanization for blacks, Hispanics, and Asians from 1970 to 1980 in 59 US metropolitan areas and considers the effect of suburbanization on segregation at the latter date. Suburbanization is measured as the proportion of each group residing outside the central city but within the SMSA, and segregation is measured...
Article
Credit default swaps (CDS) which constitute up to 98% of credit derivatives have had a unique, endemic and pernicious role to play in the current financial crisis. However, there are few in depth empirical studies of the financial network interconnections among banks and between banks and nonbanks involved as CDS protection buyers and protection se...
Article
This paper examines trends in residential segregation for blacks, Hispanics, and Asians in 60 SMSAs between 1970 and 1980 using data taken from the 1970 Fourth Count Summary tapes and the 1980 Summary Tape File 4. Segregation was measured using dissimilarity and exposure indices. Black segregation from Anglos declined in some smaller SMSAs in the s...
Article
This paper investigates some of the consequences of black residential segregation using specially compiled data for Philadelphia in 1980. Blacks, like whites, attempt to improve their neighborhood characteristics with rising social status, but unlike whites, they face strong barriers to residential mobility. As a result, high status blacks must liv...
Article
Prior research has estimated structural equation models of Hispanic and black spatial assimilation using census tract data in selected cities. While these models appeared to provide an unambiguous picture of ethnic and racial segregation in cities, their estimation from ecological data posed several conceptual and statistical difficulties. This pap...
Article
Full-text available
Our paper is a critical examination of the relationship between median housing value and racial composition for neighborhoods in the Washington DC metro area. The effect of neighborhood racial composition on homeownership and the value of those owned homes have been the topics of considerable prior research, but little of that research has examined...

Citations

... Massey ve Denton'a göre [17], Wilson ve Loic'in ya da benzerlerinin yapısal koşullara işaret ederken salt ekonomik nedenler üzerinde durmaları, sınıf-altı olgusunun temelinde yatan bir başka faktörü gizlemektedir: ...
... With more disadvantage, residents are less likely to come to each other's aid, especially in times of financial need. Compounding this situation, there has been historical disinvestment in the African American community (Massey & Denton, 1993). Declining public resources led to little political power within these communities. ...
... Desde una perspectiva procedente de la sociología norteamericana, las consecuencias negativas de la segregación derivarían de la homogeneidad social de estos barrios, donde se produciría el "efecto barrio" y se generarían "guetos" (Massey y Denton, 1993;Wilson, 2012). En buena medida, los estudios realizados sobre segregación residencial en Chile han adoptado esta perspectiva, explicando la presencia de problemas sociales en barrios segregados como un efecto de la ausencia de interacción con otros grupos sociales en el espacio barrial (Arriagada y Morales, 2006;Sabatini, Rasse, Mora, y Brain, 2012;Sabatini et ál., 2001Sabatini et ál., , 2008. ...
... The simplest is an absolute number approach (see Logan & Zhang, 2010, 1082-3 for a brief synopsis) wherein a fixed numerical threshold is used to establish the meaningful presence of a group or groups. While some studies in the past have used this technique (e.g., Alba et al., 1995), the varying population sizes of census tracts limit any widespread application of such an approach. ...
... Also, research has shown that skin color is related to assimilation outcomes, which may themselves influence racial self-identification. For example, Massey and Bitterman (1985) and Massey and Denton (1989) demonstrate that Puerto Ricans have historically been more residentially segregated than other Latino groups, and they attribute this to the generally darker skin tone of Puerto Ricans. To the extent that spatial assimilation with whites is an engine of white racial self-identification, one would expect that engine to work less efficiently for darker-skinned Latinos. ...
... The method involves calculating the approximate bias in the rank-ordered information theory index using ACS tract sampling rates and estimated population sizes and then subtracting the bias from the segregation index (Reardon et al. 2018(Reardon et al. :2135. Because segregation measures can be sensitive to population size in small MSAs (Logan et al. 2018;Napierala and Denton 2018), we conducted sensitivity analyses only examining MSAs with populations greater than 100,000 and 200,000. Results are consistent with those reported below. ...
... According to Jenkins (1997, p. 9), ethnicity comes from the ancient Greek ethnos, which refers to a range of situations in which a collectivity of humans lived and acted together, and which is typically translated today as 'people' or 'nation'. Many scholars (Banton, 1992;Brown & Schafft, 2011;Chaturvedi, 2001;Denton & Deane, 2010;Henry, 2010) argue that ethnicity has been used frequently and interchangeably with race. Nevertheless, according to Bhavnani et al. (2005), even though ethnicity is often used interchangeably with race, it differs from race because it is a social construct. ...
... Hernandez et al. (2008) presented poverty rate estimates that were adjusted for inflation and actual cost of living, which tends to increase estimates of poverty considerably. For example, the readjusted rate suggests that about 31% of young U.S.-born Caucasian children are impoverished, whereas the rates for most U.S.-born racial/ethnic minority groups and high poverty immigrant groups are in the range of 48%-82% (see Hernandez, Denton, & Macartney, 2007). And, the majority of language minority children in the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study of Kindergarten (ECLS-K) were in the two lowest quintiles for household SES (52%); 80% of the Spanish speakers who were judged to be the least fluent in English were in the lowest two SES quintiles (Espinosa, Laffey, & Whittaker, 2006). ...
... Research on racial and ethnic participation in ECE indicates that black families are more likely than white families to select center-based care (Fuller, Holloway, & Liang, 1996;Magnuson & Waldfogel, 2005), whereas Latino (and especially immigrant) families are more likely than other population subgroups to utilize relative or familial childcare (Beltrán, 2011;Fram & Kim, 2008;Fuller, Holloway, & Liang, 1996;Hernandez, Denton, & Macartney, 2011;Laughlin, 2013;Magnuson & Waldfogel, 2005). Other recent research, however, suggests that if center-based care options are available and accessible, and families know of their existence, Latino and DLL children will attend at the same rates as children of other subgroups (Espinosa et al., 2013;Greenberg & Kahn, 2012;Greenfader & Miller, 2014;Winsler, Robinson, & Thibodeaux, 2013). ...
... Researchers have asserted that immigrants to the United States face contexts of reception that are unwelcoming (Portes & Rumbaut, 2001) and can be affected by discrimination and racism (Suárez-Orozco & Suárez-Orozco, 2001). For recently arrived immigrants (referred to as newcomers by some scholars), adapting to new social and cultural contexts, learning the U.S. educational system, attaining English proficiency, adjusting to school, and acquiring new academic skills may be especially challenging (Hernandez et al., 2009;Ruizde-Velasco et al., 2001;Suárez-Orozco et al., 2011). This article explores the experiences of undocumented youth at two Title I public urban high schools in South Carolina, an anti-immigrant state in the U.S. South. ...