Nadine Burke Harris's research while affiliated with State of California and other places

Publications (15)

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Introduction Primary care-based interventions that promote nurturing caregiving relationships and early relational health may help mitigate toxic stress and promote resilience in children. This pilot study aims to: (1) describe a novel group-based, psychoeducational primary care intervention for children experiencing adverse childhood experiences (...
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The prevalence of "toxic stress"and huge downstream consequences in disease, suffering, and financial costs make prevention and early intervention crucial, say Charles A Nelson and colleagues
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Background: Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are associated with behavioral, mental, and clinical outcomes in children. Tools that are easy to incorporate into pediatric practice, effectively screen for adversities, and identify children at high risk for poor outcomes are lacking. Objective: To examine the relationship between caregiver-repo...
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Objective To examine whether the relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and health outcomes is similar across states and persists net of ACEs associations with smoking, heavy drinking, and obesity. Methods We use data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System for 14 states. Logistic regressions yield estimates of the d...
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Objectives To estimate the adult health burden and costs in California during 2013 associated with adults’ prior Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Methods We analyzed five ACEs-linked conditions (asthma, arthritis, COPD, depression, and cardiovascular disease) and three health risk factors (lifetime smoking, heavy drinking, and obesity). We es...
Data
Final pediatric ACE and other determinants of health questionnaire. (DOCX)
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Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are associated with poor health outcomes, underlining the significance of early identification and intervention. Currently, there is no validated tool to screen for ACEs exposure in childhood. To fill this gap, we designed and implemented a pediatric ACEs questionnaire in an urban pediatric Primary Care Clinic....
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Exposure to childhood adversity can result in negative behavioral and physical health outcomes due to potential long-term embedding into regulatory biological processes. Screening for exposure to adversity is a critical first step in identifying children at risk for developing a toxic stress response. We searched PubMed, PsycArticles, and CINAHL fo...
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Childhood adversity negatively impacts the biological development of children and has been linked to poor health outcomes across the life course. The purpose of this literature review is to explore and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions that have addressed an array of biological markers and physical health outcomes in children and adolesce...
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Background: Early detection of and intervention in childhood adversity has powerful potential to improve the health and well-being of children. A systematic review was conducted to better understand the pediatric health outcomes associated with childhood adversity. Methods: PubMed, PsycArticles, and CINAHL were searched for relevant articles. Lo...

Citations

... This paper is closely related to the growing literature on the societal impact of pandemics [9][10][11][12][52][53][54][55]. Previous studies on recent large-scale pandemics, including SARS, H1N1 flu, Ebola, and COVID-19, have found that the pressure, fear, and loneliness experienced during these pandemic---such as from regional lockdown, separation from families and friends, and suspension of public services---severely impaired short-term mental health [56][57][58][59]. ...
... ACEs include, but are not limited to, neglect, physical, sexual and emotional abuse, parental death or loss, bullying, and poverty. It is well established that ACEs increase the risk of emotional disorders in short-and longterm perspectives (Bellis et al., 2019;Kalmakis & Chandler, 2015;Nelson et al., 2020;Nurius, Green, Logan-Greene, & Borja, 2015). Early stressors, particularly those that are traumatic, interpersonal, and chronic, are associated with greater rates of depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), suicidal behaviours, and substance use disorders (e.g. ...
... Prospective screening is also complicated by the fact that ACEs include stigmatized and illegal behaviors, which, paired with the intended use of the measurement, has led to ACEs assessment with multiple tactics. Clinicians and researchers have measured ACEs using (1) lifelong, historical experiences (Bethell et al., 2017;Burke Harris et al., 2017;Thakur et al., 2020), (2) current adversities using proxy indicators (Hunt et al., 2017;Jimenez et al., 2016;McKelvey et al., 2016), (3) a combination of historical and proxy indicators (Marie-Mitchell et al., 2019), and (4) assessing parent's ACEs as a proxy for their children's experiences (Gillespie & Folger, 2017;Randell et al., 2015). ...
... Published estimates of nationally representative data on various ACE related conditions in 2016 were utilized to estimate spending for participants in this study and inflated to 2017 dollars (Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), 2020; Waehrer et al., 2020). The statewide share of the US personal healthcare expenses in the national health expenditure data were used to calculate adult health care costs. ...
... In 2016, the national average of children younger than 18 years of age that experienced at least one ACE was 46.3%; the reported prevalence in TN was 48.1% and in VA was 41.2%.Click or tap here to enter text. Outcome variables and risk factors for this study were selected because of their correlation to ACEs and use in previous studies (Downey et al., 2017;Miller et al., 2020). The aim of this study was to estimate the health care costs and disease burden associated with exposure to ACEs in TN and VA. ...
... However, the ACE was modified for the purpose of this study to allow the participants to not only report on events in the first 18 years of their life, but their whole lifespan. Given that the full capacity of the participants' accounts was not always reported through the specific use of words in the questionnaire (Koita et al., 2018), for the purpose of this study, further information was elicited through the means of semi-structured interviews. ...
... War exposure was measured with the War Events Questionnaire (WEQ), a 25-item checklist measuring the number of different types of war event experienced (Karam, Al-Atrash, Saliba, Melhem, & Howard, 1999). Because self-report may be less reliable in younger children (Oh et al., 2018), child and caregiver responses were combined such that if either one reported that the child experienced an event, the event was considered to have occurred. For the specific items in the war questionnaire see Figure 1. ...
... 51 Although the potential of biological measures of stress and resilience to address inequity by better aligning resources and needs has not yet been studied, evidence that social interventions can positively influence biological correlates of childhood adversity suggest that equity-focused initiatives can benefit from these types of measures in the future. 52 At a time when many of the most pressing threats to child health and development require expertise and services that are beyond the domains of conventional pediatric practice, it is essential that primary health care for young children be viewed as an integral part of a larger, multisectoral, early childhood ecosystem. Among the many professional fields engaged in the design and construction of that ecosystem, including educators, social workers, child development specialists, mental health and behavioral health clinicians, childcare providers, other clinical specialists, and policy-makers, pediatricians are uniquely positioned to make the biology of adversity and resilience measurable. ...
... For example, ACEs are related to asthma, cognitive development, infections, somatic complaints, and sleep disruption. [24][25][26] The mechanisms through which ACEs influence chronic disease outcomes include social disruption, health behaviors, and chronic stress. 27 ACEs are also related to several wellestablished risk behaviors, including illicit drug use, problematic alcohol use, physical inactivity, and sexual risk taking in adulthood. ...
... Prospective screening is also complicated by the fact that ACEs include stigmatized and illegal behaviors, which, paired with the intended use of the measurement, has led to ACEs assessment with multiple tactics. Clinicians and researchers have measured ACEs using (1) lifelong, historical experiences (Bethell et al., 2017;Burke Harris et al., 2017;Thakur et al., 2020), (2) current adversities using proxy indicators (Hunt et al., 2017;Jimenez et al., 2016;McKelvey et al., 2016), (3) a combination of historical and proxy indicators (Marie-Mitchell et al., 2019), and (4) assessing parent's ACEs as a proxy for their children's experiences (Gillespie & Folger, 2017;Randell et al., 2015). ...