N. Stephenson's research while affiliated with United States Geological Survey and other places

Publications (5)

Article
Full-text available
Past and present climate has shaped the valued ecosystems currently protected in parks and reserves, but future climate change will redefine these conditions. Continued conservation as climate changes will require thinking differently about resource management than we have in the past; we present some logical steps and tools for doing so. Three cri...
Article
Full-text available
Scientists collaborate to understand and predict the effects of a warmer climate on park and protected area ecosystems, including potential dieback of forests, reductions in streamflows, and increased severity of wildfires.
Book
Full-text available
THE GIANT SEQUOIA NATIONAL MONUMENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD Final Report In the Beginning On April 15, 2000 the President ofthe United States issued a Proclamation in which he declared , "The rich and varied landscape ofthe Giant Sequoia National Monument holds a diverse array of scientific and historic resources. Magnificent groves oftowering gi...

Citations

... Climate-induced tree mortality is emerging as an increasing concern for forest managers around the world [3], [49], [67], [68], and climate models project significant rises in global temperatures and increasing drought frequency and severity for many regions in this century, including much of the Southwest US [54], [69]. Models that link these climate projections with spatially explicit changes in forest productivity and tree mortality are needed to support adaptation planning and actions by forest managers [70], [71]. Results from this study demonstrate a successful application of a coupled ecohydrologic model in predicting forest behavior at scales relevant to park and local forest managers. ...
... The use of prescribed fire, however, requires careful consideration of treatment effects on wildlife species and communities. In particular, the uncertainty of management outcomes given potentially novel ecological conditions and processes with the interaction of climate change and human disturbance elevate the need for quantifying ecological responses (Millar et al. 2007;Seastedt et al. 2008;McKelvey et al. 2021). ...
... In contrast, ecological resilience characterises the ability of systems to absorb disturbances and maintain relationships between populations (Holling, 1973). Resilience studies that utilise an ecological perspective in isolation from social and economic factors are limited in tourism, but the concept is significant because of the insights it provides into how environments, including protected areas, respond to external pressure (Baron et al., 2009;Gunderson, 2000). More common is the adoption of socio-ecological resilience perspectives to examine resilience in the context of the embeddedness of human systems in natural ecological systems and their interaction (Amore et al., 2018;De Vos et al., 2016). ...