Murray A. Straus's research while affiliated with University of New Hampshire and other places

Publications (16)

Article
Full-text available
Cultural spillover theory asserts that the prevalence of socially legitimate violence to attain ends for which there is widespread social approval is part of the explanation for the prevalence of illegitimate violence. This study was a test of the cultural spillover theory as it applies to intimate partner violence (IPV). Based on data from the Int...
Article
Previous research on corporal punishment (CP) has found associations between CP and detrimental child outcomes including depression, behavioural problems, and crime. Conversely, positive parenting has been found to foster positive child outcomes but, positive parenting does not ameliorate the negative effects of CP. To date, research has not examin...
Article
This article provides information on eight new or previously unpublished aspects of the Conflict Tactics Scales (CTS), including new subscales and scoring methods, short forms, and new or little used methods of analysis, including reevaluation and revisions of two scales. A major section describe ways in which the CTS can be used to implement dyadi...
Article
Research on child mistreatment tends to focus on the mother or the father as the abusing parent, even though there is wide agreement that both theory and practice should deal with child maltreatment as a family system problem. Most children have the benefit or the risk of more than one caretaker for substantial periods of their lives, most often tw...
Article
A wealth of research suggests that youth whose parents use corporal punishment are more likely to engage in antisocial behavior during childhood and adolescence. Questions remain, however, about: (a) whether this relationship extends reliably to samples outside the US and Canada; (b) whether corporal punishment is associated with antisocial behavio...
Article
Full-text available
The article provides a general background for this special issue, describing its starting point and goals, and their implementation guidelines.
Article
Full-text available
In the longstanding controversy over gender differences in perpetration of physical intimate partner violence (PV), one side argues for gender asymmetry (i.e., mainly men perpetrate PV) and the other side argues for gender symmetry (i.e., women perpetrate PV in similar proportions to men). This article proposes an empirical bridge between the two s...
Article
Based on information 11,408 university students provided on perpetration of physical assault in a romantic relationship, they were classified into three Dyadic Concordance Types (DCTs). We then examined six risk factors drawn from previous literature of partner violence: physical abuse as a child, antisocial personality characteristics, alcohol abu...
Article
Part 1 evaluates Hamby’s (2016) Partner Victimization Scale (PVS) and concludes that it fails to identify cases of female PV and lacks validity. Part 2 evaluates Hamby’s results as if they were correct and shows women perpetrated 2/3 as much partner violence (PV) as men and that it is frequent and a serious problem needing immediate attention. Part...
Chapter
Partner violence (PV) is a considered a major social concern in the United States and other Western nations and is the focus of regular educational, prevention, and treatment efforts in these nations. Feminist advocacy movements in the 1970s brought PV out of the home and into the public eye. About this time, the major controversy regarding PV also...
Article
This article describes a simple and powerful conceptual perspective and methodological approach to understanding aggression in family relationships and for developing violence prevention programs and helping victims: The core element is Dyadic Concordance Types (DCTs). Because of the importance of gender in such relationships, the DCTs used for thi...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on Partner Violence (PV) in global context. We introduce readers to definitions and measures of PV and discuss the prevalence rates of PV to both men and women across the globe. We also discuss the possible causes of PV and the controversies surrounding those causes. Our discussion then moves to potential consequences of PV to...
Book
Why do parents hit those they love? What effect does it have on children? What can be done to end this pattern? These are some of the questions explored in The Primordial Violence. Featuring longitudinal data from over 7,000 U.S. families as well as results from a 32 nation study, the book presents the latest research on the extent to which spankin...
Article
Full-text available
This study focused on violent and prosocial behaviors by adolescents toward parents and teachers, and the relation between such behaviors and adolescents’ perceptions about the family and school environment. Gender differences in child-to-parent violence and student-to-teacher violence were also studied. The sample comprised 687 adolescents from se...

Citations

... Aynı şekilde iki grup birbirine yakın oranda flört şiddetine maruz kalmışlardır. Bulgu, şiddet içeren ilişkide her iki tarafın hem fail hem de mağdur olarak hareket edebileceğini göstermekte; literatürde flört şiddetinin karşılıklı olduğunu ortaya koyan araştırmaları desteklemektedir (Akış, vd., 2019;Burke, Stets ve Pirog-Good, 1989;Gray ve Foshee, 1997;Harned, 2001;Malik, Sorenson ve Aneshensel, 1997;Marshall ve Rose, 1988;Stets ve Straus, 1989;Straus, 2004Straus, , 2008Straus, , 2010Straus ve Ramírez, 2007). Flört ilişkisinin çift yönlülüğü, mağdur tarafın saldırganın ulaştığı pozitif sonuçları görüp, şiddeti bir sorun çözme yöntemi olarak taklit edebilmesinden kaynaklanabilir. ...
... While both men and women can be perpetrators and victims of IPV, evidence suggests that violence is most frequently perpetrated by men towards women [10,11] and the violence perpetrated by men is typically more severe and associated with greater injury [12,13]. Unequal relationship power dynamics, prevailing social norms around gender and traditional constructs of masculinity that emphasize male exertion of power (at time through force) over females place women at greater risk of experiencing IPV [14,15]. ...
... Finally, future studies need to use randomized sampling techniques or representative samples of the general population to avoid potential sampling bias. Moreover, these findings need to be replicated in other samples from different countries as cultural factors play a pivotal role in how negative behaviors and violence are legitimated or tolerated (e.g., Giorgi et al., 2015;Lysova & Straus, 2020). However, although previous studies have found cross-cultural differences in bullying prevalence rates (Van de Vliert et al., 2013), there is no clear evidence about the cultural or geographical differences in strain development. ...
... They increase with the range of violence experienced and its severity (Felitti et al., 1998;Anda et al., 2010). Immediate consequences are injury and anxiety, although the cultural specificity of these effects is debated (Straus et al., 2013;Lansford et al., 2005), while long-term VAC is associated with the major causes of death in adulthood (Felitti et al., 1998;Anda et al., 2010;Norton & Kobusingye, 2013;Hillis et al., 2000Hillis et al., , 2016, often through biological processes (Anda et al., 2010;Danese & McEwen, 2012). ...
... Recently Gershoff and Grogan-Kaylor (2016) showed that even when confounding variables, such as physical or psychological abuse, were removed from the models, "spanking" was still associated with negative child outcomes. King et al. (2018) also found that the reported aggression was higher among respondents who experienced recurrent CP during upbringing and Proulx et al. (2018) have shown that CP was positively related to criminal propensity and actual crime, even when controlling for positive parenting. Both ID:p0100 CP and PA have been associated with a number of internalizing and externalizing problem behaviors among children and adolescents (Gershoff, 2002). ...
... In addition, children from single-parent families are more likely to be neglected than children from two-parent families [10,11,18,20,22,25,28]. Thus, there is broad agreement that child maltreatment should be analysed as a problem in the family system, although research focuses on the mother or father [44]. ...
... Each item is rated on a 7-point scale: This has never happened (0), once (1), twice (2), 3-5 times (3), 6-10 times (4), 11-20 times (5), and more than 20 times (6). As well, items in each subscale are considered to reflect either "minor" (e.g., "My partner threw something at me that could hurt") or "severe" (e.g., "My partner choked me") acts of violence (Straus & Douglas, 2017; see Supplementary Table 4). Per recommendations by Straus and Douglas (2017), severity levels were created for each subscale, which were dichotomized based on the endorsement of minor versus severe acts of abuse. ...
... A growing body of scholarship has also examined whether, and to what extent, being spanked in childhood is associated with negative adult outcomes, including antisocial behavior (e.g., Rebellon & Straus, 2017). Rebellon and Straus (2017), for instance, examined whether corporal punishment was associated with adult antisocial behavior. ...
... Recent scholarship indicates that adolescents in abusive relationships are likely to experience victimization and engage in perpetration behaviors [3,5]. For example, a national study on ADA reported that 84% of victims also engaged in perpetration, and 92% of perpetrators also experienced victimization [6]. ...
... Developed countries started collecting data on violence regardless of gender in the early 2000s. The literature analyzing the prevalence of violence by gender of the perpetrator finds that bidirectional violence is the most common type experienced in relationships in developed countries and is consistently identified when both partners are surveyed (Archer, 2000;Hines et al., 2020;Langhinrichsen-Rohling et al., 2012;Miller et al., 2011;Straus, 2011Straus, , 2015Winstok & Straus, 2016). 1 In developing countries, the majority of the data on IPV comes from WHO and the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS). A common standard for measuring IPV is the WHO survey module, 2 which contains a large number of questions in which the respondent is asked to report about progressively more severe levels of violence. ...