Mizuko Ito's research while affiliated with University of California, Irvine and other places

Publications (11)

Article
Bringing together popular culture studies and sociocultural learning theory, in this paper we formulate the concept of connected civics, grounded in the idea that young people today are engaging in new forms of politics that are profoundly participatory. Often working in collaboration with adult allies, they leverage digital media and emerging mode...
Book
Full-text available
This report is a synthesis of ongoing research, design, and implementation of an approach to education called “connected learning.” It advocates for broadened access to learning that is socially embedded, interest-driven, and oriented toward educational, economic, or political opportunity. Connected learning is realized when a young person is able...
Article
Full-text available
Conventional wisdom about young people's use of digital technology often equates generational identity with technology identity: today's teens seem constantly plugged in to video games, social networks sites, and text messaging. Yet there is little actual research that investigates the intricate dynamics of youth's social and recreational use of di...

Citations

... "Geeking out" is the most popular of these alternative genres with 34 videos. Its name is inspired by Ito et al.'s (2010) investigation into online geek cultures where the term refers to groups of people who share videos for the purposes of entertaining or distracting each other: "Geek cred involves learning to navigate esoteric domains of knowledge and practice and being able to participate in communities that traffic in these forms of expertise" (Horst, Herr-Stephenson, & Robinson, 2010, p. 67). ...
... Research on the variables which positively influence the attitude toward mobile phone advertising have shown entertainment as being the most influential variable . This would point to the fact that individuals are more likely to pay attention to an advertisement if it perceived as entertaining, especially while being exposed to online games and videos (Boyd, 2014;Burroughs, 2017;Castelló-Martínez & Tur-Viñes, 2020;Feijoo et al., 2020a;Ito et al., 2010;Pires et al., 2019). The emerging phenomenon of influencers has also captured the attention of researchers (Del Moral et al., 2016;Feijoo & Sádaba, 2021;Núñez-Gómez et al., 2020) for their ability to benefit from the closeness of the relationship that is established through mobile phones. ...
... Today's youth may be coming of age and struggling for autonomy and identity as did their predecessors, but they are doing so amid reconfigured contexts for communication, friendship, play, and self-expression (Ito, Horst, Bittanti, Boyd, Herr-Stephenson, Lange, Pascoe and Robinson, 2008). But, the media can help youth to learn the norms and values of the political system; shape their own political views and develop a sense of civic responsibility (Wonneberger & Kim, 2017 (Ikpe & Olise, 2010). ...
... In both cases, we can observe that there are several approaches to learning across contexts that have contributed to a better understanding of learning as a fluid and connected phenomenon across time and space. Some examples can be seen in the proposals of lifelong learning (Edwards, 2000;Field & Leicester, 2000;Jarvis, 2009); learning ecology (Barron, 2006(Barron, , 2010; boundary crossing (Akkerman & Bakker, 2011;Engeström et al., 1995;) and; connected learning (Ito et al., 2013(Ito et al., , 2020Livingstone & Sefton-Green, 2016). These theoretical and empirical approaches to the study of cross-context learning are mostly focused on the connections made in in-school and out-of-school contexts, emphasizing the socio-institutional and physical character of access and participation. ...
... Some investigators express concern that adolescents who are accustomed to dealing with intensive flows of information through working simultaneously with multiple media (i.e., media multitasking, Veen and Vrakking 2008), and navigating through relatively short fragments of text, may develop "grasshopper minds" (Carr 2010), rendering them unable and unwilling to embark on disciplined intellectual activity. It is also suggested that some young people are driven by harmonious passions in their engagement in intensive socio-digital participation (Vallerand et al. 2007), which enable them to develop their skills and competences, and to engage in increasingly more complex activities (Ito et al. 2010). Others, however, may develop obsessive passions (Vallerand et al. 2007) or even addictions that involve repeated participation in compulsive, monotonous activities related to computer gaming or surfing the Internet, for instance. ...
... Our project and its focus on digital spatial storytelling extends the work of studies that investigated the relationship between digital storytelling mediums and community inquiry generally (e.g., Ito et al., 2015;Jenkins et al., 2016;Mihailidis, 2014) as well as research examining transnational and immigrant youth multimodal storytelling more specifically (e.g., Honeyford, 2014;Kim, 2018;Nogueròn-Liu & Hogan, 2017;Vasudevan et al., 2010). This latter work collectively shows how multimodality better fits the complexity of linguistic and cultural identities. ...
... This entertainment factor allows users or students to focus on solving real-life problems using the motivating potential of computer games (Lee & Hammer, 2011). Because computer games could result in individuals to use problem-solving skills voluntarily for hours in a gaming environment (Gee, 2008). ...
... The use of ICT for creative purposes has also been increasingly stressed. In this regard, Ito et al. (2008) contend that children's participation in society does not only require the ability to access "serious" online information and culture, but also the ability to creatively participate in recreational and social activities online. Refecting this trend, a recent review compares 13 digital literacy frameworks, drawn mainly from Europe across fve areas: operational and technical; information and cognition; digital communication; digital content creation; and strategic (Iordache et al., 2017). ...
... We sought a mobile and agile method, available for participating doctors to connect with researchers at any time during or outside their workday as events, comments or answers to questions occurred. We also sought a method which allowed instant interactivity, allowing us to replicate virtually the 'hanging out' nature of ethnographic observation (Ito et al., 2010). Basing connection on mobile-phone devices was an obvious choice due to their ubiquitous use for communication and work operations in modern medicine (Nair et al., 2021). ...