Mirko Hohmann's scientific contributions

Publications (3)

Article
Full-text available
This report is the second in a series of papers on Computer Security Incident Response Teams (CSIRTs). The first publication, CSIRT Basics for Policy-Makers, offers a general examination of the history, types and culture of CSIRTs. This second report focuses on national CSIRTs (nCSIRTs) and their relevance for cybersecurity and examines how and whe...
Conference Paper
Following reports of foreign government surveillance starting in June 2013, senior officials and public figures in Europe have promoted proposals to achieve “technological sovereignty”. This paper provides a comprehensive mapping and impact assessment of these proposals, ranging from technical ones, such as new undersea cables, encryption, and loca...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we examine the history, types and culture of Computer Security Incident Response Teams (CSIRTs). Some CSIRT practitioners and policymakers have differing views of what a national CSIRT should be, how it should operate, where it should be situated and how it should relate to the rest of the computer security incident response network...

Citations

... National Computer Security Incident Response Teams (CSIRTs) are a relatively recent form of institution, which act as a coordinator and a point of contact for domestic and international stakeholders during an incident. Some of these have been established from scratch, while others have been elevated from existing areas of cybersecurity capacity within their countries (Maurer et al., 2015). These expert communities, trusted clearing houses of security information, are found in many countries, sectors and networks, with 109 national CSIRTs worldwide as of March ...
Reference: Cybersecurity
... The classification of a CSIRT allows determining the area over which incidents are managed to generate a possible solution, for which there are five types of classifications that are presented in Figure 3. Depending on the selected organizational model, it is possible to provide different services, taking into account that the quality and level will be different from each other to determine the corresponding area; the maturity and experience of the CSIRT are taken into account [24,25]. ...
... The new policies, without any endeavors to disentangle the notions of sovereignty and Internet jurisdiction from territoriality, lead to fragmentation (balkanization) of the Internet (Polatin-Reuben and Wright 2014) or its breaking up into a 'splinternet' (O'Hara and Hall 2018). Furthermore, they do not seem to be really meeting their objectives (see Maurer et al. 2015). ...