Min Sok Lee's research while affiliated with University of Chicago and other places

Publications (9)

Article
Policymakers are increasingly turning to insights gained from the experimental method as a means to inform large-scale public policies. Critics view this increased usage as premature, pointing to the fact that many experimentally tested programs fail to deliver their promise at scale. Under this view, the experimental approach drives too much publi...
Article
Over 25% of the US population volunteers. Clary et al. (1998) devised a survey that identifies a volunteer’s primary motive for volunteering. We investigate the effect of tailoring the communications that volunteers receive from their organizations (e.g., printed newsletters, update emails) to each volunteer’s stated motive for volunteering affects...
Article
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Scholars in economics and psychology have created a large literature studying reward, punishment and reciprocity. Labor markets constitute a popular application of this body of work, with particular emphasis on how reciprocity helps regulate workplace relationships where managers are unable to perfectly monitor workers. We study how idiosyncratic f...
Article
A stylized fact is that agents respond more acutely to negative than positive stimuli. Such findings have generated insights on mechanism-design, have been featured prominently in policymaking, and more generally have led to discussions of whether preferences are defined over consumption levels or changes in consumption. This study reconsiders this...
Article
When deviating from best responses, do people have a stronger propensity to increase or decrease other people's payoffs? Offerman (2002) finds that negative intentions are more likely to induce payoff decreases than positive intentions are to induce payoff increases. Using the Falk and Fischbacher (2006) model, we approach the same question as Offe...
Article
This paper addresses three questions: (1) When deciding on whether to reward or punish someone, how does how you think others expect you to behave affect your decision? (2) Does it depend upon whether others expect you to reward them vs. punish them? (3) What is the interpretation of such a causal effect? We investigate these questions using a modi...

Citations

... Some recent reviews include Della Vigna and Linos (2020), who review the effectiveness of nudge randomised-controlled trials (RCTs) across two so-called 'nudge units;' Beshears and Kosowsky (2020) who review 174 nudge studies to evaluate the average effect size of different nudge strategies; and Jachimowicz et al. (2019), who review 58 studies specifically investigating the default option nudge to determine the effect size associated with this specific nudge. There have also been recent calls to consider experimental practices in choice-architectural design (John 2021), to consider strategies for scaling nudge interventions (Al-Ubaydli et al. 2021), and for widespread adoption of A/B testing methods (Benartzi 2017). ...
... The recent work of Al-Ubaydli et al. [20] is a cogent example of a holistic approach to scaling social science research in the real world. The model Al-Ubaydli and colleagues proposed pointed to three main barriers to scalability in small-scale, successful interventions: inference, representativeness of the population, and representativeness of the situation [20,21]. First, the authors suggest that there may be issues with the reliability of the evidence, due to the lack of replication of the effects, insufficient power in the studies, and incorrect interpretation of the p-value of results. ...
... In volunteer-based systems generally, as well as in expert groups, financial reward does not improve individual or group performance much (Yancey et al. 2006). The most persistent contributions and the greatest effort in participation are derived from 'internal' motivators such as peer recognition, enhancement of status, career prospects, prospects of enjoyable interactions , participation in a positive environment and making a difference (Osterloh and Frey 2002, Benabou and Tirole 2006, Al-Ubaydli and Lee 2011, Shaw et al. 2011) ...
... In this vein, reciprocation can be either positive or negative (Cropanzano & Mitchell, 2005). In positive reciprocity people prefer to respond to a perceived positive behaviour positively-if you share your knowledge with me, I will share mine with you, whereas lack of reciprocation (negative reciprocity) takes place when individual tend to hide their knowledge from their counterparts (Al-Ubaydli & Lee, 2009;Offerman, 2002). In this regard, Kube et al. (2013) argue that negative behaviours are strong and sustainable, thus, lack of reciprocation significantly increases the likelihood of hiding knowledge in an organisation (Haas & Park, 2010;Kumar Jha & Varkkey, 2018). ...
... Given the conflicting predictions of the two classes of models, it is ultimately an empirical question whether the revealed pro-sociality of an agent increases or decreases in her expectations about the payoff expectation of the other agent. Previous studies investigating this issue -often obtained by employing variants of the trust game as the work-horse -provide mixed results: while some papers (as, for instance, Guerra & Zizzo, 2004, Charness & Dufwenberg, 2006and Bacharach et al., 2007 find a positive correlation between second-order beliefs and pro-social behavior, others (as, for instance, Ellingsen et al., 2010, or Al-Ubaydli & Lee, 2012 find no correlation, or even a (slightly) negative one. ...