Milena Pisano's research while affiliated with Università degli Studi di Sassari and other places

Publications (3)

Article
Morphine withdrawal produces a hypofunction of mesencephalic dopamine neurons that impinge upon medium spiny neurons (MSN) of the forebrain. After chronic treatment (from 20 to 140 mg/kg of morphine twice a day over 14 days at escalating doses) rats were withdrawn from chronic morphine spontaneously and pharmacologically. In these two distinct cond...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents the proceedings of a symposium at the 2004 meeting of the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism, held in Mannheim, Germany. The symposium was organized by Etienne Quertemont and chaired by C. J. Peter Eriksson. The presentations were (1) Brain ethanol metabolism and its behavior consequences, by Sergey M....
Article
This article represents the proceedings of a symposium at the 2004 annual meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism in Vancouver, Canada. The symposium was organized by Etienne Quertemont and chaired by Kathleen A. Grant. The presentations were (1) Behavioral stimulant effects of intracranial injections of ethanol and acetaldehyde in rats, by M...

Citations

... Some anti-alcoholic drugs, such as disulfiram, block acetaldehyde dehydrogenase conversion of acetaldehyde to acetic acid thereby increasing concentrations of acetaldehyde for treating AUD. Some animal studies support the result that acetaldehyde has a reinforcing effect on itself or forms new products in the brain that activate the brain's sense of reward and drive drinking behavior, such as tetrahydroisoquinolines (Quertemont et al., 2005). In addition, acetaldehyde also enhances alcohol sensitivity, representing the comprehensive pharmacological effects of positive reinforcement and negative aversion. ...
... CYP2E1 is a variant of cytochrome P450. Expression of CYP2E1 in neurons and glial cells can be induced by alcohol exposure in specific regions of the brain, including the cerebral cortex, thalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum [239][240][241][242]. Inhibition or genetic deficiency of CYP2E1 significantly reduced acetaldehyde production in the rodent brain [243,244]. Using pharmacological and genetic approaches, Zimatkin and colleagues demonstrated in rodent brain homogenates that catalase and CYP2E1 account for about 60% and 20% of alcohol metabolism in the brain in vitro, respectively, while ADH only plays a minor role, if any [245]. ...
... With regard to the effects of chronic exposure to opioids on dopamine function, there appears to be a general consensus that there is a downregulation of dopamine system function [18,19]. This idea is supported by a large body of evidence that suggests extracellular dopamine and metabolite levels in the striatum (including dorsal and ventral striatum) are decreased during withdrawal following chronic exposure to opioids [20][21][22][23][24]. Furthermore, chronic exposure to opioids causes reductions in VTA dopamine neuron morphology [25][26][27][28]. The firing rate of VTA dopamine neurons was also found to be reduced during opioid withdrawal [29,30]. ...