Mike Worboys's research while affiliated with University of Maine and other places

Publications (10)

Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter presents the concept of decentralized spatial computing (DeSC) as a way to embed dynamic spatial data capture and processing capabilities within our built urban environment. The chapter illustrates the potential of DeSC for safeguarding privacy in a dynamic location-based services scenario: Mobile service users protect their potentiall...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we examine whether the formalization of changes in the spatial relations of two moving regions provides an adequate characteriza-tion of the conceptualization of perceived motion events of those regions. The changes we consider are topological transformations that result in gradual topo-logical changes. Using a series of experiments,...
Article
GIS: A Computing Perspective, Second Edition, provides a full, up-to-date overview of GIS, both Geographic Information Systems and the study of Geographic Information Science. Analyzing the subject from a computing perspective, the second edition explores conceptual and formal models needed to understand spatial information, and examines the repres...
Article
As the use of geographical information systems develops apace, a significant strand of research activity is being directed to the fundamental nature of geographic information. This volume contains a collection of essays and discussions on this theme. What is geographic information? What fundamental principles are associated with it? How can it be r...
Article
Full-text available
The storage and analysis of large amounts of time varying spatial and aspatial data is becoming an important feature of many application domains. This re-quirement has fueled the need for spatio-temporal extensions to data models and their associated querying facilities. To date, much of this work has focused on the relational data model, with obje...
Article
Full-text available
Traditional computational models of geographic phenomena offer no room for imperfection. Underlying this tradition is the simplifying assumption that reality is certain, crisp, unambiguous, independent of context, and capable of quantitative representation. The paper will report on work, undertaken as part of a joint project between the universitie...
Article
This paper describes the development of an approach to spatial analysis in the setting of a non-Euclidean space. Almost all current GIS functionality assumes that constituent spatial entities in the system are referenced to the coordinatized Euclidean plane. However, there are many situations for which representation in a Euclidean space is not the...

Citations

... There exists prior work on spatial algebra that is closely related to our contributions but does not admit of an as-is implementation over WSNs. One example of such prior work is the Tripod spatio-temporal database system (Griffiths et al. 2001), whose goal was to extend an object-oriented database system with spatio-temporal capabilities. Tripod uses the finite-resolution computational geometry and ROSE algebra proposed in Güting and Schneider (1995) and Schneider (1997). ...
... Geographical information systems (GIS) have been increasingly used in geosciences (Bedell 1995;Worboys and Duckham 2004). In the last few decades, the combination of remote sensing data and various topographic, geological, hydrogeological, land use and other maps have made it possible to obtain general information about the terrain and its characteristics, and have facilitated the creation of hydrological and hydrogeological models. ...
... Indeed, in the "Introduction" to the book "Foundations of Geographic Information Science" edited by Duckham et al. (2003), it was stated that "Information science can be defined as the systematic study according to scientific principles of the nature and properties of information. Geographic information science is the subset of information science that is about geographic information". ...
... Another common theme in research related to alignment of geospatial ontologies is extensional matching (Cruz and Xiao 2008;Du et al. 2013;Duckham and Worboys 2007;Chaabane and Jaziri 2018). Extensional matchers begin by trying to determine when two instances represent the same spatial feature. ...
... In summary, TEER extends EER by allowing attributes to act as temporal fluents, but there is no notation for expressing processes or events. Another approach to modeling spatio-temporal information is an extension of the object model provided in the TRIPOD project [13] to include the construction of object histories. TRIPOD provides both a model and an implementation for a spatiotemporal database. ...
... General spatial and temporal ontologies have been extensively studied (see [1] and [16] for overviews), though existing geographic information systems lack explicit support of " events " as a first-class entity [6, 7, 11, 12, 13, 22, 23, 24],. A distinction between " things " and " happenings " (or " occurent " ) must be drawn to facilitate effective study of event-oriented geographic phenomena. ...
... This can be due to measurement inaccuracies in the source data, uncertainties introduced in spatial data pre-and postprocessing, misspecifications of model variables or data parameters, propagated uncertainties in simulation runs, or predictive models of space-time phenomena and processes (Zhang and Goodchild 2002). Simply put, all spatial data on which our space-time decisions are based are indeed subject to uncertainties (Duckham et al. 2001). ...
... For example, Cliff and Haggett (1998) find that functional spaces based on airline traffic provide greater explanatory and predictive power in analyses of infectious disease diffusion in Iceland. Plane (1984) and Worboys et al. (1998) reach similar conclusions in analyses of migration flows. Time–spaces are a type of functional space where distances correspond to the realized travel times between locations . ...