Michelle Ann Kline's research while affiliated with Brunel University London and other places

Publications (16)

Article
Full-text available
This paper provides a roadmap for engaging in cross-cultural, developmental research in practical, ethical, and community-engaged ways. To cultivate the flexibility necessary for conducting cross-cultural research, we structure our roadmap as a series of questions that each research program might consider prior to embarking on cross-cultural examin...
Article
Full-text available
Communities want to determine their own climate change adaptation strategies, and scientists and decision-makers should listen to them — both the equity and efficacy of climate change adaptation depend on it. We outline key lessons researchers and development actors can take to support communities and learn from them.
Preprint
We develop a conceptual framework for studying collective adaptation: the process of iterative co-adaptation of cognitive strategies, social environments, and problem structures. Going beyond searching for “intelligent” collectives, we integrate research from different disciplines to show how collective adaptation perspective can help explain why s...
Article
Full-text available
Tool innovation has played a crucial role in human adaptation. Yet, this capacity seems to arise late in development. Before 8 years of age, many children struggle to solve the hook task, a common measure of tool innovation that requires modification of a straight pipe cleaner into a hook to extract a prize. Whether these findings are generalizable...
Article
Humans are selective social learners. In a cultural landscape with many potential models, learners must balance the cost associated with learning from successful models with learning from accessible ones. Using structured interviews, we investigate the model selection biases of Congolese BaYaka adolescent boys learning to hunt with spears (n p 24;...
Preprint
Full-text available
This paper provides a roadmap for engaging in cross-cultural, developmental research in practical, ethical and community-engaged ways. To cultivate the flexibility necessary for conducting cross-cultural research, we structure our roadmap as a series of questions that each research program might consider prior to embarking on cross-cultural examina...
Article
Full-text available
We examine the opportunities children have for interacting with others and the extent to which they are the focus of others’ visual attention in five societies where extended family communities are the norm. We compiled six video-recorded datasets (two from one society) collected by a team of anthropologists and psychologists conducting long-term r...
Article
Full-text available
Aspects of human life history and cognition, such as our long childhoods and extensive use of teaching, theoretically evolved to facilitate the acquisition of complex tasks. The present paper empirically examines the relationship between subsistence task difficulty and age of acquisition, rates of teaching, and rates of oblique transmission among H...
Article
Full-text available
The intensifying pace of research based on cross-cultural studies in the social sciences necessitates a discussion of the unique challenges of multi-sited research. Given an increasing demand for social scientists to expand their data collection beyond WEIRD (Western, educated, industrialized, rich and democratic) populations, there is an urgent ne...
Preprint
Full-text available
The intensifying pace of research based on cross-cultural studies in the social sciences necessitates a discussion of the unique challenges of multi-sited research. Given an increasing demand for social scientists to expand their data collection beyond WEIRD (western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic) populations, there is an urgent n...
Preprint
All of the policies adopted or proposed so far to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus require immediate and extensive behavioral change. However, even when the benefit of the behavior change is supported by solid science, actually changing behavior is difficult. Doing so effectively requires an appreciation for how people learn behaviors, and...
Preprint
Aspects of human life history and cognition, such as our long childhoods and extensive use of teaching, theoretically evolved to facilitate the acquisition of complex tasks. Using interviews conducted with Hadza and BaYaka foragers from Tanzania and the Republic of Congo, the present paper empirically examined the relationship between subsistence t...
Article
Full-text available
Long-lasting, romantic partnerships are a universal feature of human societies, but almost as ubiquitous is the risk of instability when one partner strays. Jealous response to the threat of infidelity is well studied, but most empirical work on the topic has focused on a proposed sex difference in the type of jealousy (sexual or emotional) that me...
Article
Across the lifespan and across populations, humans “overimitate” causally unnecessary behaviors. Such irrelevant‐action imitation facilitates faithful cultural transmission, but its immediate benefits to the imitator are controversial. Over short time scales, irrelevant‐action imitation may bootstrap artifact exploration or interpersonal affiliatio...
Article
Full-text available
Culture is a human universal, yet it is a source of variation in human psychology, behaviour and development. Developmental researchers are now expanding the geographical scope of research to include populations beyond relatively wealthy Western communities. However, culture and context still play a secondary role in the theoretical grounding of de...

Citations

... Ecosystems on land are often managed at local/ regional scales, but marine ecosystems are managed at national to international scales. National to international scale governance disempowers local actors from effecting change or driving adaptation (Pisor et al., 2022) and instead places responsibility on governments or intergovernmental agencies, leading to, for example, differences in the way people extract resources from land versus sea (Singh et al., 2021). The issue is not the specific scale of management but rather in the scale mismatches between management and ecological and social processes (discussed in Boxes 2 and 3). ...
... Kitanishi [39] reports that group sizes for day-long hunting excursions (esondo) range from three to 13 participants (mean = 5.8). Among Congo Basin foragers including BaYaka, learning to hunt with spears starts around the age of 3 years, when children participate in target practice games, pretense play, and rat hunting with lightweight wooden spears [43,[45][46][47][48]. In situ learning starts in early adolescence, when boys accompany fathers and other adult men on spear hunts [22,39,49]. ...
... These findings suggest that the MSR test may not be a universal measure of the development of selfconcept, as is commonly assumed, due to the significant cross-cultural differences that suggest a difference in the test's meaning. In a comparative study of an innovation task that involves child participants fashioning a hook to retrieve an item from a narrow tube, Lew-Levy et al. (2021) found that children innovated with the pipe cleaner outside of the experimental setting much more readily than from within it. This suggested the possibility of an issue with internal validity related to the protocol or experiment, and one that could have led to inaccurate interpretations if not for the use of observational data to supplement the experimental tasks. ...
... Indeed, Mardu and Meriam children are efficient collectors of small prey and marine resources . According to Lew-Levy et al. (2021), the difficulty of a task is not related to the age of skill acquisition; Bliege Bird (2002, 2005) highlighted that body size rather than skill seems to limit the energetic return of foraging. ...
... Furthermore, the microbiota of Indigenous peoples have been targeted for basic research, thus necessitating the discussion and implementation of ethical practices akin to those already set forth in human genetics research [1][2][3][4][5][6] . Many social scientists have been writing about the demand for more ethical participatory work and providing research guidelines since the 1960s 7-10 , with a resurgence in recent years [11][12][13] . Increasingly, Indigenous communities are developing research-based codes of ethics [14][15][16] , including for short-term visitors who will not participate in long-term community engagement. ...
... However, control policies have historically focused on the population-level consequences, neglecting individual-level incentives and costs associated with complying with public health recommendations 6,7 . Characterization of the effectiveness of control policies and their viability requires understanding how behavioral modifications intended to reshape epidemic dynamics at the population scale interact with individual microeconomics, beliefs, perceptions and health incentives [8][9][10][11] . Heterogeneous living conditions (socioeconomic characteristics, beliefs, education, demography, etc.) modulate the behavioral choices individuals make during the epidemic period. ...
... . The WEIRD bias in psychological research is welldocumented and accepted by the research community as a fundamental issue to the field (Arnett 2008;Nielsen et al. 2017;Gurven 2018;Hruschka et al. 2018b;Kline et al. 2018;Rad et al. 2018;Barrett 2020a). As time has passed since the coining of the term WEIRD (Henrich et al. 2010), researchers have realized that the bias has cascading effects that permeate many aspects of scientific practice, including the diversity of institutions and researchers, the design of research studies, and the validity of protocols (Kline et al. 2018;Broesch et al. 2020;Forscher et al. 2021;IJzerman et al. 2021;Silan et al. 2021). ...
... Similarly, Willard [50] examined group biases and prosocial behaviour among different religious groups in Fiji. In the same population as the McNamara and Henrich studies, Kline et al. [51] report that Fijians, but not Peruvian Indigenous samples, show irrelevant action imitation of White experimenters suggesting that the political context and attitude towards colonization by White Europeans may impact basic social cognitive processes. ...
... Higher relative emotional jealousy among females might be, partly, a consequence of higher obligatory investment into reproduction and offspring, which makes females even more concerned about a partner's investment. However, this pattern may be specific to a more Westernized type of society, while more traditional societies are more upset by partners' sexual extrapair involvement (Scelza et al., 2019). ...
... . The WEIRD bias in psychological research is welldocumented and accepted by the research community as a fundamental issue to the field (Arnett 2008;Nielsen et al. 2017;Gurven 2018;Hruschka et al. 2018b;Kline et al. 2018;Rad et al. 2018;Barrett 2020a). As time has passed since the coining of the term WEIRD (Henrich et al. 2010), researchers have realized that the bias has cascading effects that permeate many aspects of scientific practice, including the diversity of institutions and researchers, the design of research studies, and the validity of protocols (Kline et al. 2018;Broesch et al. 2020;Forscher et al. 2021;IJzerman et al. 2021;Silan et al. 2021). ...