Michael Lipsett's research while affiliated with California Department of Public Health and other places

Publications (58)

Article
Full-text available
Background: Although pesticide use is widespread, the possible effect of early-life exposure to organophosphate (OP) on pediatric respiratory health is not well described. Objectives: We investigated the relationship between early-life exposure to OPs and respiratory outcomes. Methods: Participants included 359 mothers and children from the CHAMACO...
Article
Full-text available
Several studies have linked long-term exposure to particulate air pollution with increased cardiopulmonary mortality; only two have also examined incident circulatory disease. To examine associations of individualized long-term exposures to particulate and gaseous air pollution with incident myocardial infarction and stroke, as well as all-cause an...
Article
To cite this article: Herr CEW, Ghosh R, Dostal M, Skokanova V, Ashwood P, Lipsett M, Joad JP, Pinkerton KE, Yap P-S, Frost JD, Sram R, Hertz-Picciotto I. Exposure to air pollution in critical prenatal time windows and IgE levels in newborns. Pediatric Allergy Immunology 2011: 22: 75–84. The objective of this study was to analyze the mechanisms by...
Article
Full-text available
Toxic exposures have been shown to influence maturation of the immune system during gestation. This study investigates the association between cord blood lymphocyte proportions and maternal exposure to air pollution during each gestational month. Cord blood was analyzed using a FACSort flow cytometer to determine proportions of T lymphocytes (CD3+...
Article
Full-text available
Several studies have reported associations between long-term exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM) and cardiovascular mortality. However, the health impacts of long-term exposure to specific constituents of PM(2.5) (PM with aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm) have not been explored. We used data from the California Teachers Study, a...
Article
Full-text available
Obesity is a risk factor for asthma, particularly in women, but few cohort studies have evaluated abdominal obesity which reflects metabolic differences in visceral fat known to influence systemic inflammation. A study was undertaken to examine the relationship between the prevalence of asthma and measures of abdominal obesity and adult weight gain...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies have found that the risk of childhood asthma varies by month of birth, but few have examined ambient aeroallergens as an explanatory factor. A study was undertaken to examine whether birth during seasons of elevated ambient fungal spore or pollen concentrations is associated with risk of early wheezing or blood levels of Th1 and Th2 ty...
Article
Full-text available
There is limited information on the public health impact of wildfires. The relationship of cardiorespiratory hospital admissions (n = 40 856) to wildfire-related particulate matter (PM(2.5)) during catastrophic wildfires in southern California in October 2003 was evaluated. Zip code level PM(2.5) concentrations were estimated using spatial interpol...
Article
Full-text available
Living near traffic has been associated with asthma and other respiratory symptoms. Most studies, however, have been conducted in areas with high background levels of ambient air pollution, making it challenging to isolate an independent effect of traffic. Additionally, most investigations have used surrogates of exposure, and few have measured tra...
Article
Full-text available
Several studies have demonstrated associations between daily mortality and ambient particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (fine particles or PM2.5). Few, however, have examined the relative toxicities of PM2.5 constituents, including elemental carbon and organic carbon (EC and OC, respectively), nitrates and transition metals. There i...
Article
We examined the relationship between asthma prevalence and BMI in a cross-sectional survey of 471,969 adolescents. The size of the survey allowed us to investigate this relationship with much greater resolution than previously possible. Both lifetime and current asthma prevalence increased monotonically with increasing BMI, starting with individual...
Article
Full-text available
Few studies of air pollutants address morbidity in preschool children. In this study we evaluated bronchitis in children from two Czech districts: Teplice, with high ambient air pollution, and Prachatice, characterized by lower exposures. Our goal was to examine rates of lower respiratory illnesses in preschool children in relation to ambient parti...
Article
Full-text available
The sentiment that woodsmoke, being a natural substance, must be benign to humans is still sometimes heard. It is now well established, however, that wood-burning stoves and fireplaces as well as wildland and agricultural fires emit significant quantities of known health-damaging pollutants, including several carcinogenic compounds. Two of the prin...
Article
Full-text available
Several epidemiologic studies provide evidence of an association between daily mortality and particulate matter < 2.5 pm in diameter (PM2.5). Little is known, however, about the relative effects of PM2.5 constituents. We examined associations between 19 PM2.5 components and daily mortality in six California counties. We obtained daily data from 200...
Article
Full-text available
Children who reside in agricultural settings are potentially exposed to higher levels of organophosphate (OP) pesticides, endotoxin, and allergens than their urban counterparts. Endotoxin and allergens stimulate maturation of the immune response in early childhood, but little is known about the effect of exposures to OPs or to the three combined. I...
Article
Asthma prevalence for different ethnic groups in the United States, beyond white, black and Hispanic, is seldom reported. We compared the prevalence of asthma diagnosis among various Hispanic and Asian American ethnic subgroups using data collected from the school-based California Healthy Kids Survey. The California Healthy Kids Survey was administ...
Article
Full-text available
Alterations in cardiac autonomic control, assessed by changes in heart rate variability (HRV), provide one plausible mechanistic explanation for consistent associations between exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) and increased risks of cardiovascular mortality. Decreased HRV has been linked with exposures to PM10 (PM with aerodynamic diame...
Article
Full-text available
Many epidemiologic studies provide evidence of an association between daily counts of mortality and ambient particulate matter<10 microm in diameter (PM10). Relatively few studies, however, have investigated the relationship of mortality with fine particles [PM<2.5 microm in diameter (PM2.5)], especially in a multicity setting. We examined associat...
Article
Full-text available
Health burdens associated with poor housing and indoor pest infestations are likely to affect young children in particular, who spend most of their time indoors at home. We completed environmental assessments in 644 homes of pregnant Latina women and their children living in the Salinas Valley, California. High residential densities were common, wi...
Article
Full-text available
The National Children's Study will address, among other illnesses, the environmental causes of both incident asthma and exacerbations of asthma in children. Seven of the Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research (Children's Centers), funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the U.S. Env...
Article
Full-text available
Effects of air pollution on morbidity and mortality may be mediated by alterations in immune competence. In this study we examined short-term associations of air pollution exposures with lymphocyte immunophenotypes in cord blood among 1,397 deliveries in two districts of the Czech Republic. We measured fine particulate matter < 2.5 microm in diamet...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies, primarily in Europe, have reported associations between respiratory symptoms and residential proximity to traffic; however, few have measured traffic pollutants or provided information about local air quality. We conducted a school-based, cross-sectional study in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2001. Information on current bronchitis...
Article
Air pollution is a heterogeneous, complex mixture of gases, liquids, and particulate matter. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a consistent increased risk for cardiovascular events in relation to both short- and long-term exposure to present-day concentrations of ambient particulate matter. Several plausible mechanistic pathways have been d...
Article
Uniform guidelines have been developed for the derivation of 1-h acute inhalation reference exposure levels (RELs) applicable to the general public exposed routinely to hazardous substances released into the environment. Existing acute exposure guidance values developed by other organizations have been examined, and strengths and weaknesses in thes...
Article
The work presented in this paper examines the characteristics, chemical composition and relationship between indoor and outdoor particulate matter (PM) in the Coachella Valley, a unique desert area in southern California. Fine (0–2.5 μm) and coarse (2.5–10 μm) PM concentrations were measured concurrently indoors and outdoors in 13 residences during...
Article
Full-text available
Significant increases in asthma morbidity and mortality in the United States have occurred since the 1970s, particularly among African-Americans. Exposure to various environmental factors, including air pollutants and allergens, has been suggested as a partial explanation of these trends. To examine relations between several air pollutants and asth...
Article
Full-text available
Many epidemiological studies provide evidence of an association between ambient particles, measured as PM10, and daily mortality. Most of these studies have been conducted in urban areas where PM10 is highly correlated with and dominated by fine particles less than 2.5 microm in diameter (PM2.5). Fewer studies have investigated impacts associated w...
Article
Many epidemiological studies provide evidence of an association between airborne particles, measured as PM10 (particulate matter less than 10 microm in diameter), and daily morbidity and mortality. Most of these studies have been conducted in urban areas where PM10 consists primarily of fine particles (<2.5 microm in diameter). Few studies have inv...
Article
Numerous reports document significant worldwide increases in asthma morbidity and mortality from the late 1970s to the early 1990s. Various social and environmental factors, including exposure to indoor and outdoor pollutants and allergens, have been postulated as partial explanations of increasing asthma trends. Although air pollution concentratio...
Article
During the winters of 1986-1987 through 1991-1992, rainfall throughout much of Northern California was subnormal, resulting in intermittent accumulation of air pollution, much of which was attributable to residential wood combustion (RWC). This investigation examined whether there was a relationship between ambient air pollution in Santa Clara Coun...
Article
Clinical and epidemiologic evidence suggests that particulate matter and ozone are associated with exacerbations of asthma. African-American children, who experienced a marked increase in asthma morbidity and mortality during the 1980s, may represent a particularly sensitive subgroup. In order to examine potential effects of air pollution on exacer...
Article
Although there is abundant clinical evidence of asthmatic responses to indoor aeroallergens, the symptomatic impacts of other common indoor air pollutants from gas stoves, fireplaces, and environmental tobacco smoke have been less well characterized. These combustion sources produce a complex mixture of pollutants, many of which are respiratory irr...
Article
This paper reports the results of an investigation of the acute effects of air pollution in 321 nonsmoking adults residing in Southern California. Previous epidemiologic investigations of effects of acute exposure to ozone have focused on groups who may not be representative of the general public, such as asthmatics or student nurses. For this stud...
Article
Controlled exposure studies suggest that asthmatics may be more sensitive to the respiratory effects of acidic aerosols than individuals without asthma. This study investigates whether acidic aerosols and other air pollutants are associated with respiratory symptoms in free-living asthmatics. Daily concentrations of hydrogen ion (H+), nitric acid,...
Article
The possibility of accidental industrial chemical releases has generated considerable recent attention. One area requiring research for emergency planning is the development of safe exposure concentrations for the public in the event of an inadvertent release. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established a list of extreme...
Article
In September and October of 1987, the California Department of Health Services responded to community complaints by investigating the relationship between health symptoms and community exposure to cotton defoliants. Symptoms experienced during the 1987 cotton defoliation season by 232 residents of cotton-growing communities were compared with sympt...
Article
Some consequences of acute exposure to ozone are best measured in studies of human respiratory responses in controlled exposure chambers. These studies typically examine relationships between exposures to alternative pollutant concentrations and indicators of lung function as measured by spirometry, such as forced expiratory volume in one second, F...

Citations

... In the framework of the Particle Component Toxicity (NPACT) project, Lippmann et al. (2013) showed that PM 2.5 mass and EC were linked to all-cause mortality; EC was also connected with ischemic heart disease mortality. The latter result was quite similar to the findings of Ostro et al. (2010Ostro et al. ( , 2011Ostro et al. ( , 2015, including OC, SO 4 , NO 3 , and SO in addition to EC. Concerning cardiopulmonary disease mortality, a strong association was observed for the exposure to NO 3 and SO 4 (Ostro et al., 2010(Ostro et al., , 2011. Luben et al. (2017) and Hoek et R. S. Sokhi et al.: Advances in air quality research al. (2013) in their reviews observed the association of BC with cardiovascular disease hospital admissions and mortality. ...
... Increased mortality and morbidity in childhood and an elevated risk of hypertension, ischemic heart disease and noninsulin dependent diabetes were observed in such individuals. This indicates that a decrease in birth weight may be related to some functional insufficiency, which may manifest itself as child morbidity during childhood [37] as well as increased morbidity in middle age. ...
... They found that different particles were emitted during the burning process. Woodsmoke also releases NH 3 , CO, NO 2 and SO 2 as well as fine particulate matter (Naeher et al., 2005). Damgaard et al. (2010) discuss the energy recovered from municipal solid waste incineration, and emissions released to the atmosphere when waste is burnt. ...
... In research by Raanan et al. (2015), the findings suggest that exposure to organophosphate pesticides since gestation is associated with respiratory symptoms consistent with a possible diagnosis of asthma in a population of children. The effect size estimates were not detailed in the original publication [25]. ...
... 10 Additional cohorts recently used to assess long-term air pollution and mortality in the United States include the Health Professional's Study, 11 the Nurses' Health Study, [12][13][14] the Women's Health Initiative, 15 and the California Teachers Study. 16,17 The American Heart Association has concluded that the evidence is consistent with a causal relationship between fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) exposure and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. 18 Most US studies have been limited to predominantly white study populations; in studies using more heterogeneous cohorts, sample sizes have been insufficient to examine separate associations by race and ethnicity or to examine whether associations differ by race and ethnicity. ...
... Moreover, the results of some studies have indicated that early exposure to pesticides up to the age of 4 years is the most relevant time window of exposure [30, 31]. It was also shown that contact of the children in the first year of life with a mother who was herself in contact with pesticides in the case of occupational and/or residential exposure was likely to increase the likelihood of wheezing and childhood asthma [39, 42], non-infectious cough in children aged 5–6 years [36], and wheezing in children under 18 years of age [43]. A recent review was published, by GASCON et al. [50], on the effects of persistent organic pollutants (DDE, PCBs, HCB, hexachlorocyclohexanes and other persistent organic pollutants) on the developing respiratory and immune systems. ...
... In many previous research studies, it was documented that urban ambient air pollution was closely associated with deaths due to respiratory causes (Schwartz, 2005;Bell et al., 2006;Wilson, 2014;Pekkanen et al., 2002;Brooks et al., 2010). In addition to this, the link between particulate matter concentration and risk of respiratory morbidity was widely studied (Ostro et al., 1995;Schwartz and Morris, 1995;Agarwal et al., 2006;Maji et al., 2018aMaji et al., , 2018b. There was significant positive as well as statistical association of respiratory disease with air pollutants (Wong et al., 2002;Wai et al., 2012;Cropper et al., 1997). ...
... In other words, PM.25 is more dangerous than that of PM10 ("IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans," 2010;Nevers, 1999). The short and long term effects of PM10 on human health have been reported by Gauvin et al. (Gauvin et al., 1999) and Ostro et al. (Ostro et al., 1998). ...
... Reddy et al. [22] also reported that an estimated three billion people rely on biomass and coal as their primary source of domestic energy. Several sources have found that indoor pollution from use of biomass indoors causes an estimated 1.6 million premature deaths annually [13,26]. Despite the general global acceptance of biomass stove over the traditional stove, its acceptance in Nigeria is still very low [18,23]. ...