Michael A. White's research while affiliated with The University of Sheffield and other places

Publications (6)

Data
Table S1. Microarray data and RT‐PCR comparing the 150% and 40% aerobiosis steady states and at time points during the transition from 150% to 40% aerobiosis. In the ‘All significant (p < 0.05) genes’ tab, the fold‐changes of genes which showed a greater than twofold change in expression with a significance of p < 0.05 at any one of the time points...
Data
Fig. S1. Physiological data for the transition experiment from 150% to 40% aerobiosis. At time zero, the input gas composition was changed from 7.5% v/v oxygen (150% aerobiosis) to 1.88% oxygen (40% aerobiosis). A. Change in optical density at 600 nm. B. Corresponding increase in the specific acetate excretion rate. C. Dry weight at the high and lo...
Data
Table S2. Label‐free LC‐MS/MS analysis of proteins at 40% and 150% aerobiosis. Samples from three independent steady‐states at 1.88% v/v oxygen or 40% aerobiosis (LF1‐3) and three at 7.5% v/v oxygen or 150% aerobiosis (LF‐4‐6) were analysed by LC‐MS/MS as described in Experimental Procedures. In the tables shown, A,B,C are gel lane replicates of ea...
Data
Table S3. 2D‐gel analysis of proteins from cells grown at all steady‐states from 25% to 345% aerobiosis. In the ‘All steady‐state raw data’ tab, the normalised spot volumes from image analysis for a given protein are shown for multiple gels run with a minimum of 1 steady‐state per oxygen input condition (50% and 75% aerobiosis) or with two or more...
Article
Full-text available
Campylobacter jejuni, the most frequent cause of food-borne bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide, is a microaerophile that has to survive high environmental oxygen tensions, adapt to oxygen limitation in the intestine and resist host oxidative attack. Here, oxygen-dependent changes in C. jejuni physiology were studied at constant growth rate using c...
Article
Full-text available
Campylobacter jejuni, the leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis, requires low environmental oxygen and high carbon dioxide for optimum growth, but the molecular basis for the carbon dioxide requirement is unclear. One factor may be inefficient conversion of gaseous CO2 to bicarbonate, the required substrate of various carboxylases. Two p...

Citations

... Among the ASVs that were more abundant in the high-treatment samples at later time points were members of the order Campylobacterales. Most species of this order are capnophiles that thrive in high-CO 2 environments (Al-Haideri et al. 2016;Waite et al. 2017). ASVs in the genus Vibrio initially had low abundances in the high-CO 2 treatment, but at later time points they were significantly more abundant in the high-CO 2 treatment than in the control. ...