Micha V. Jackson's research while affiliated with University of Adelaide and other places

Publications (13)

Article
Monitoring is critical to assess management effectiveness, but broadscale systematic assessments of monitoring to evaluate and improve recovery efforts are lacking. We compiled 1,808 timeseries from 71 threatened and near‐threatened terrestrial and volant mammal species and subspecies in Australia (48% of eligible threatened mammal taxa), to compar...
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Coastal wetlands around the world have been degraded by human activities. Global declines in the extent of important habitats including mangroves, salt marsh and tidal flats necessitate mitigation and restoration efforts, however some well‐meaning management actions, particularly mangrove afforestation and breakwater construction, can inadvertently...
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Designating protected and conserved areas is a critical component of biodiversity conservation. The 10th Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in 2010 set global targets for the areal extent of protected areas (PAs) that were met partially in 2020, yet a new, more ambitious target is needed to halt ongoing global biodiversity loss. China recentl...
Article
Article Impact Statement: Protecting natural areas and improving the quality of anthropogenic landscapes as habitat are both needed to achieve effective conservation. Abstract: Anthropogenic impacts have reduced natural areas but increased the area of anthropogenic landscapes. There is debate about whether anthropogenic landscapes (e.g., farmland...
Article
Shorebirds in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway have experienced population declines linked to loss of coastal wetlands. Despite this vulnerability to habitat loss, shorebirds regularly use artificial habitats, especially for high-tide roosting. Understanding the distribution of shorebirds in artificial versus natural roosts could inform habitat m...
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China's coastal wetlands are critically important to shorebirds. Substantial loss of tidal flats, shorebirds' primary foraging grounds, has occurred from land claim and other processes, and is driving population declines in multiple species. Smooth cordgrass Spartina alterniflora was intentionally introduced to the coast of China in 1979 to promote...
Article
Monitoring migratory species can be extremely challenging. For example, millions of migratory shorebirds migrate from breeding grounds in northern China, Mongolia and Russia to East Asia and Australasia each year, traversing more than 20 countries while on migration. Studies within individual nations have identified rapid declines in many species,...
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Loss and degradation of wetlands has occurred worldwide, impacting ecosystems and contributing to the decline of waterbirds, including shorebirds that occur along the heavily developed coasts of the East Asian-Australasian Flyway (EAAF). Artificial (i.e. human-made) wetlands are pervasive in the EAAF and known to be used by shorebirds, but this phe...
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The extent of intertidal flats in the Yellow Sea region has declined significantly in the past few decades, resulting in severe population declines in several waterbird species. The Yellow Sea region holds the primary stopover sites for many shorebirds during their migration to and from northern breeding grounds. However, the functional roles of th...
Article
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Chinese coastal wetlands in the Yellow and Bohai Seas provide a network of breeding, stopover, and wintering sites that are critical for the survival of many migratory waterbird species. However, land use change, particularly from coastal reclamation, has caused severe population declines of waterirds. Although 19 sites, covering 1.51 million hecta...
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Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs) are critical strongholds for the environmental services that they provide, not least for their role in climate protection. On the basis of information about the distributions of IFLs and Indigenous Peoples’ lands, we examined the importance of these areas for conserving the world's remaining intact forests. We determ...
Article
Migratory shorebirds are declining in all transequatorial flyways, most rapidly in the East Asian–Australasian Flyway. Population trends for shorebirds have been derived at a flyway and continental scale, but changes at the local scale are less well understood. Here we compare trends in migratory shorebird populations using natural and artificial r...

Citations

... Indeed, coasts and mangroves are mosaics of areas with different successional histories and in constant change (Alongi 2009), so restoration outcomes can affect or be affected by adjacent environments (Sharma et al. 2017). For example, the expansion of afforested mangroves has reduced shorebird populations (some of them endangered) foraging along migratory areas in China, Australia, New Zealand, and Taiwan (Choi et al. 2022). In the Caribbean, mangrove-rich systems have a strong influence on fish community biomass in adjacent coral reefs, mostly by providing refuge for juveniles. ...
... Due to the stress of global climate change and the influence of anthropological factors, the ecological environment has been damaged and the grasslands' degradation is serious; this leads to a reduction in the water conservation capacity, deterioration of the soil and production loss, all of which impact the lifestyle of local herdsmen in the region [3][4][5] For the regional rotational grazing and grass stand management, a comprehensive grazing ban was implemented on moderately degraded grassland in the HYR, under the Qinghai Sanjiangyuan Nature Reserve Construction Phase I and Phase II. The project achieved remarkable results and the ecological situation has improved significantly [6][7][8]. ...
... Artificial landscape expansion, which occurs at the expense of natural landscapes, is a manifestation of increasing human-induced global changes with profound consequences for global biodiversity (Newbold et al., 2015;Diaz et al., 2019). Understanding the role of artificial habitats in the maintenance of wildlife populations will help to improve the management of artificial habitats to mitigate the negative impacts of natural landscape reductions on wildlife biodiversity (Wang et al., 2022). Many studies have assessed the function of artificial habitats in supporting wildlife by comparing diversity indicators between artificial and natural habitats. ...
... Spartina was recognized as a negative factor for the coastal wetland bird community because dense Spartina stands restrict bird movements and provide insufficient useable food for most birds (Gan et al. 2009), and the occurrence of Spartina reduces the availability of foraging and roosting habitats for shorebirds (Jackson et al. 2021). Thus, many physical, chemical and biological removal treatments have been developed to eliminate these plants (Tang et al. 2021). ...
... Studies at the species level, especially those focused on habitat specialists, have found that some birds cannot successfully relocate to alternate sites if their major staging sites are lost (Fuller et al., 2021;Moores et al., 2016). According to our results at the community level, conserving habitats at other stopover sites cannot fully compensate for the destruction of one stopover site. ...
... These habitat changes have impacted the habitat use of many wildlife species, including birds, which are widely distributed in wetlands (Ma et al., 2010;Levy, 2015;Katayama et al., 2019). While some bird species are highly dependent on natural wetlands, others can use a variety of artificial wetlands as resting, foraging, or nesting sites (Pierluissi, 2010;Windels et al., 2013;Jackson et al., 2020). Many studies have used measurements of species richness and abundance to reflect the quality and importance of wetlands for birds (e.g., Li et al., 2013). ...
... Alternatively, subspecific differences in south migration timing may reflect differing strategies for where and when subspecies undergo flight feather molt; C. a. arcticola and sakhalina undergo flight feather molt on their breeding grounds (mid-June to late August; [45,83], whereas, C. a. kistchinski initiate flight feather molt in mid-July (on their breeding [45] or nonbreeding grounds [84] and complete it on China Sea and Yellow Sea nonbreeding grounds (e.g., that seen in Dunlin in the western Palearctic, [85]; Table 2, [84]. If the south migration initiation dates we observed are widespread among C. a. kistchinski, efforts to identify and conserve important China Sea and Yellow Sea molting sites may be more critical to the persistence of this subspecies than previously recognized [33,86]. ...
... These regions were mainly distributed along the northwestern and eastern parts of the Yellow River Delta. These findings are consistent with the results of previous studies [15,17,28] and indicate that land reclamation poses a serious threat to shorebird habitat connectivity. ...
... Declines have been associated with rapid habitat loss and degradation at the species' primary migratory staging area in the Yellow Sea (Amano, Székely, Koyama, Amano, & Sutherland, 2010;Studds et al., 2017), with hunting at the breeding grounds and disturbance at nonbreeding grounds representing other known but poorly quantified threats (Dhanjal-Adams, Mustin, Possingham, & Fuller, 2016;Gallo-Cajiao et al., 2020;Klokov, Gerasimov, & Syroechkovskiy, 2019). Population changes, however, have not been even across the nonbreeding range, with continental-and local-scale analyses revealing steep declines in southeast Australia compared to stable and, in some places, increasing trends in northwest Australia (Clemens et al., 2016;Hansen, Menkhorst, Moloney, & Loyn, 2015;Lilleyman et al., 2020;Reid & Park, 2003;Rogers, Scroggie, & Hassell, 2020;Studds et al., 2017;Wilson, Kendall, Fuller, Milton, & Possingham, 2011). This raises the question of whether far eastern curlew from different nonbreeding regions are exposed to different threats across the annual cycle that have manifested in differential population trends. ...
... The importance of Indigenous inclusion extends from a question of social justice to an understanding that Indigenous Ecological Knowledge and the rights of Indigenous Peoples are critically important to achieving climate and biodiversity goals (IPBES 2019). Indigenous Peoples manage or have rights over a quarter of the world's land surface, overlapping with 40% of terrestrial protected areas and at least 36% of intact forest landscapes (Garnett et al. 2018;Fa et al. 2020). Recognizing this, the 2021 Marseille Manifesto of the International Union for Conservation of Nature's World Conservation Congress declares that "the rights of Indigenous peoples and local communities underpin their central role in conservation, as leaders and custodians of biodiversity," and calls upon the recognition of Indigenous governance and leadership as a critical mechanism required to achieve conservation goals (IUCN 2021). ...