Melissa Conley Tyler's research while affiliated with Australian Institute of Polish Affairs and other places

Publications (5)

Article
Diplomats are the face of their country abroad. One way that a country can represent and benefit from its diversity is through the diversity of its diplomatic representatives. Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) has made a sustained effort to increase the diversity of its workforce and has improved the representation of some...
Article
The future of foreign policy think tanks should involve acting as a training ground for the next generation of international affairs professionals. Internships are widely recognized as a way of improving young people's skills and employment prospects. A case study of the Australian Institute of International Affairs' (AIIA's) internship program sho...
Chapter
Australia has three enduring national interests: security, prosperity and the maintenance of the international system. The objective of Australia’s foreign policy is thus clear: it should help advance these national interests. But what happens when these three national interests come into conflict? Should one be favoured over the others or is it po...
Article
Australia is serving on the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) as a non-permanent member for 2013–14. Australia’s campaign slogan was ‘Making a Difference for the Small and Medium Countries of the World’ and its bid promoted Australia’s positive reputation as a creative middle power. Experience shows that there is scope for middle powers to exe...

Citations

... The original scheme significantly raised Australia's profile within the Asian region (Oakman 2010). While the Colombo Plan invited students into Australia to acquire useful skills and knowledge, the NCP is instead focussed outwards with Australian students gravitating towards the region in order to strengthen ties with the Indo-Pacific region (Oakman 2010;Byrne 2016;Byrne et al. 2016). The NCP is highlighted in policy documents as an influential public diplomacy program in building a secure future for Australia in the Indo-Pacific region. ...
... For queer women, the chances of getting an international representative role would seem low-employment opportunities are generally unevenly distributed across classes, gender, sexuality and ethnicity (Ackerly et al. 2006;Acker 2012), suggesting queer women are minority within an already marginalized group in international affairs. The point at which queer, feminist and diplomatic theory meet presents a rich site for analysis to understand what it takes to represent a state internationally, particularly given that diverse diplomacy is critical to the functioning and representation of states (Conley Tyler 2016). ...
... They need the votes of at least four elected members as nine affirmative votes are required for any resolution to be passed. One should remember that it was the lack of these necessary nine votes rather than the threat of French veto that prevented the draft US-UK resolution from being endorsed in the lead-up to the Iraq War (Conley Tyler & Pahlow, 2014). Second, as the variety and volume of the Council's tasks have widened since the end of the Cold War, the opportunities and tools that elected numbers can use also have increased. ...