Mélanie Roffet-Salque's research while affiliated with University of Bristol and other places

Publications (39)

Article
Full-text available
Direct and accurate radiocarbon dating of lipid residues preserved in ceramics is a recently established method that allows direct dating of specific food products and their inception in human subsistence strategies. The method targets individual fatty acids originating from animal fats such as ruminant dairy, ruminant adipose, non-ruminant adipose...
Article
Full-text available
In European and many African, Middle Eastern and southern Asian populations, lactase persistence (LP) is the most strongly selected monogenic trait to have evolved over the past 10,000 years1. Although the selection of LP and the consumption of prehistoric milk must be linked, considerable uncertainty remains concerning their spatiotemporal configu...
Article
Written sources and iconographic evidence suggest that honey and beehive products, used in culinary, medicinal and technological functions since pre‐Neolithic times, were likely known and used in Phoenician and Punic Sardinia. The role of these resources is nonetheless poorly understood since no direct evidence survives on a macroscopic level. Sign...
Preprint
Full-text available
Stable isotope signatures of domesticates found on archaeology sites provide information about past human behaviour, such as the evolution and adaptation of husbandry strategies. A dynamic phase in cattle husbandry evolution is during the 6th millennium BCE, where the first cattle herders of central Europe spread rapidly through diverse forested ec...
Article
El Portalón de Cueva Mayor located in the UNESCO World Heritage Centre of Atapuerca, is a unique reference Late Prehistory archaeological site in the Iberian Peninsula, covering some 7 kyr of Holocene occupations. Herein we present the study of lipid residue analyses from 108 pottery sherds coupled with faunal kill-off patterns from the Neolithic,...
Article
The analysis of lipids and other biomolecules preserved in archaeological artefacts, using chromatographic and mass spectrometric techniques, is a powerful approach, which has provided unprecedented insights into the diet and cultural practices of past populations. In more recent years, the now-mature field of organic residue analysis (ORA) has ent...
Article
Full-text available
Present-day domestic cattle are reproductively active throughout the year, which is a major asset for dairy production. Large wild ungulates, in contrast, are seasonal breeders, as were the last historic representatives of the aurochs, the wild ancestors of cattle. Aseasonal reproduction in cattle is a consequence of domestication and herding, but...
Article
The Neolithic site of Bylany (CZ) is one of the largest and most thoroughly described Neolithic settlement in Central Europe. Although a comprehensive understanding has been achieved of the household development and pottery assemblage, little is known about household economies, dietary practices and animal exploitation strategies at the site. Nowad...
Article
Full-text available
https://rdcu.be/b3s6J Pottery is one of the most commonly recovered artefacts from archaeological sites. Despite more than a century of relative dating based on typology and seriation1, accurate dating of pottery using the radiocarbon dating method has proven extremely challenging owing to the limited survival of organic temper and unreliability o...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents the results of the first dedicated study of organic residues in Portugal, extracted from pottery excavated from Anta 1 de Val da Laje passage grave. We fully exploit the organic residue extract, to obtain information regarding the diet of the people and their relationship with the environment, the socio-economic aspects of an...
Data
Supplementary information to Cramp et al. Regional diversity in subsistence among early farmers in Southeast Europe revealed by archaeological organic residues.
Article
Full-text available
The spread of early farming across Europe from its origins in Southwest Asia was a culturally transformative process which took place over millennia. Within regions, the pace of the transition was probably related to the particular climatic and environmental conditions encountered, as well as the nature of localized hunter-gatherer and farmer inter...
Article
Full-text available
The spread of early farming across Europe from its origins in Southwest Asia was a culturally transformative process which took place over millennia. Within regions, the pace of the transition was probably related to the particular climatic and environmental conditions encountered, as well as the nature of localized hunter–gatherer and farmer inter...
Article
Organic residue analysis utilizes analytical organic chemical techniques to identify the nature and origins of organic remains that cannot be identified using traditional techniques of archaeological investigation because they are either amorphous, invisible, or present at trace concentrations. Investigations have confirmed the survival of a wide r...
Article
Full-text available
The 8.2-thousand years B.P. event is evident in multiple proxy records across the globe, showing generally dry and cold conditions for ca. 160 years. Environmental changes around the event are mainly detected using geochemical or palynological analyses of ice cores, lacustrine, marine, and other sediments often distant from human settlements. The L...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last decade, studies of ancient biomolecules—particularly ancient DNA, proteins, and lipids—have revolutionized our understanding of evolutionary history. Though initially fraught with many challenges, the field now stands on firm foundations. Researchers now successfully retrieve nucleotide and amino acid sequences, as well as lipid signa...
Article
The emergence of agriculture in Greece denotes the start of the Neolithic in Europe, however, little is known about dietary practices in the region. Archaeobotanical and zooarchaeological remains indicate reliance on cereals and pulses, together with meat-based subsistence practices, including sheep/goat and pig husbandry. Preliminary investigation...
Article
Résumé Ce chapitre présente des données archéologiques et biologiques permettant de retracer l’histoire de l’utilisation des laitages et l’évolution de la persistance de l’enzyme lactase, responsable de la digestion du lactose, dans les populations européennes. Nous faisons état de recherches archéologique, anthropologique et de génétique évolutive...
Article
Full-text available
Degraded animal fats, characterised by the presence of palmitic (C16:0) and stearic (C18:0) fatty acids and related glycerolipids are the most common class of preserved lipids in organic residues trapped in the porous clay matrix of archaeological ceramic vessels. The ubiquitous presence of fatty acids in animal fats and plant oils precludes identi...
Article
Archaeological potsherds have become a valuable source of information about diet and the wider economies of ancient communities, especially through the analysis of lipids preserved in the microporous matrix of the ceramic vessels. This study investigated > 160 potsherds recovered from settlement phase 19 dated to 5160–5100 cal. BC from the Neolithi...
Chapter
Le regard porté sur les sociétés du passé et leurs systèmes techno-économiques permet une mise en perspective sur le temps long de problématiques éminemment actuelles.
Article
Full-text available
In the absence of any direct evidence, the relative importance of meat and dairy productions to Neolithic prehistoric Mediterranean communities has been extensively debated. Here, we combine lipid residue analysis of ceramic vessels with osteo-archaeological age-at-death analysis from 82 northern Mediterranean and Near Eastern sites dating from the...
Article
Full-text available
Investigations of organic residues associated with archaeological pottery using modern analytical chemical methods began in the 1970s. There was early recognition that the analysis of lipids (i.e. fats, waxes and resins) preserved in surface residues or the fabric of single pottery sherds, representative of single vessels, was a powerful method for...
Article
Full-text available
Late Neolithic settlements dating to around 7000 cal. BC are widespread in Upper Mesopotamia, however, the site of Tell Sabi Abyad is unique in the scale and quality of excavation, revealing an extensive architecture, huge numbers of domesticated animal bones, stone tools and potsherds. A previous study reported lipid residues in nearly 300 potsher...
Article
Full-text available
The pressures on honeybee (Apis mellifera) populations, resulting from threats by modern pesticides, parasites, predators and diseases, have raised awareness of the economic importance and critical role this insect plays in agricultural societies across the globe. However, the association of humans with A. mellifera predates post-industrial-revolut...
Article
Full-text available
The pressures on honeybee (Apis mellifera) populations, resulting from threats by modern pesticides, parasites, predators and diseases, have raised awareness of the economic importance and critical role this insect plays in agricultural societies across the globe. However, the association of humans with A. mellifera predates post-industrial-revolut...
Article
Lactase is the enzyme that breaks down the milk sugar lactose, and in most mammals, including most humans, lactase activity is down-regulated after the weaning period is completed. However, in about 35% of adults worldwide, lactase continues to be expressed throughout adulthood, a feature termed lactase persistence (LP). Genetic evidence indicates...

Citations

... 57,58,[62][63][64] Finally, ancient DNA studies in Europe also show negligible frequencies of LP alleles in Mesolithic through Bronze Age populations (~15,000-3,000 years ago), and indicate that these alleles only became exceedingly widespread by the Middle Ages. 49,64,65 Altogether, this evidence suggests that LP evolved in parallel after dairying became common. ...
... Unfortunately, the available data do not enable disentangling climatic and cultural factors affecting calving aseasonality, but provisioning of winter foddering would likely have been necessary [91]. Such provisioning was apparently met through forest pasturing by LBK societies [125]. Year-round cattle breeding would have enabled a constant supply of raw milk. ...
... However, this criterion cannot be used to distinguish archaeological horse fats Viktor Zaibert is deceased. from other fat sources due to fatty acid distributions being altered during burial (De Jong et al. 1961;Dudd et al. 1998;Mills and White 2012;Whelton et al. 2021). Significantly, determinations of δ 13 C values of the C 16:0 and C 18:0 FAs offer the possibility to discriminate horse lipids from ruminant, porcine or aquatic products. ...
... Lipid analysis of 5000-year-old sherds from El Portalón de Cueva Mayor archaeological site (Burgos, Spain) revealed evidence of cattle farming. Novel archeozoological analyses revealed that the most abundant lipid residues identified were dairy fats, followed by ruminant/non-ruminant adipose fats [9]. ...
... As evidence suggests that most of the 1.5-2.5 l of cows' milk available per day per animal (Ebersbach 2002;Gross / Jacomet / Schibler 1990;Ebersbach 2010) was being processed, little fresh milk was actually available for consumption, thus reducing the need for possessing the mutant alleles. Moreover, unlike modern breeds, prehistoric cattle was probably not reproductively active throughout the year, thus setting seasonal limitations on the availability of milk as well as increasing the desirability of producing storable dairy products to supplement diets over extended parts of the year (Balasse et al. 2021). Iron Age populations, therefore, could still benefit from the positive nutritional effects of dairy consumption. ...
... Arbogast et al., 2018;Bedault, 2009;Hachem et al., 2014). Dairy products are also evidenced, but in unknown proportions (Balasse and Tresset, 2002;Drieu et al., 2020;Gillis et al., 2017). The contribution of plants is difficult to quantify as there are few preserved remains, but cereals (wheat and barley) are well attested (Bakels, 1997;Hamon et al., 2019;Martin et al., 2014;Meunier et al., 2006) whereas millet (C4 plant) appeared later in northern France during the Bronze Age (Auxiette et al., 2018. ...
... Although modern sheep is the domestic species that produces the least milk (McClure 2013), its milk is the richest in fats and solids (Dahl and Hjort 1976;Alston-Mills 1995;Redding 1981) and therefore it would be useful for derived products (Degen 2007). Derived dairy products must have been important for the first farming groups because the lactase persistence allele was not present in those populations (Debono Spiteri et al. 2016;Roffet-Salque et al. 2017). It is more difficult to detect fibre exploitation in the Early Neolithic. ...
... It is only in recent years that work has focused on understanding pottery function by combining extraction yields, structural molecular information, isotopic data and/ or morphological criteria (e.g. Brychova et al., 2021;Drieu et al., 2021;Drieu, Mirabaud, et al., 2020;Dunne, Chapman, et al., 2020;Fanti et al., 2018;Heron et al., 2015;Matlova et al., 2017;Šoberl et al., 2014;Stojanovski et al., 2020). Various absorption patterns along the vertical profile have been identified in some of these studies (e.g. ...
... wider-mouthed vessels were used for meaty stews and mixed cooking, whilst both shallow bowls and jars with relatively narrow mouths were used for milk and cereals. Interestingly, this can be compared and contrasted with patterns seen in Middle Neolithic pottery from eastern France where dairy products were associated either with small pots (micro pots or pots with <20 cm rim diameter and volumes of <1 L) or large open-mouthed vessels with a much larger volume distribution including open cups and goblets 41 . Finally, it can be observed that the relatively small 'Unstan' type bowls appear to be associated with dairy products and not meat-based dishes. ...
... More recent advances in the component specific radiocarbon dating (e.g. Casanova et al., 2020), has so far not been tried in the Indian sites. ...