Megan Cattau's research while affiliated with Boise State University and other places

Publications (7)

Article
Full-text available
Detecting newly established invasive plants is key to prevent further spread. Traditional field surveys are challenging and often insufficient to identify the presence and extent of invasions. This is particularly true for wetland ecosystems because of difficult access, and because floating and submergent plants may go undetected in the understory...
Article
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Losses from natural hazards are escalating dramatically, with more properties and critical infrastructure affected each year. Although the magnitude, intensity, and/or frequency of certain hazards has increased, development contributes to this unsustainable trend, as disasters emerge when natural disturbances meet vulnerable assets and populations....
Article
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During the 21st century, human–environment interactions will increasingly expose both systems to risks, but also yield opportunities for improvement as we gain insight into these complex, coupled systems. Human–environment interactions operate over multiple spatial and temporal scales, requiring large data volumes of multi‐resolution information fo...
Preprint
Traits are notoriously challenging to measure at a desirably large spatial extent with traditional field methods, which limits the discoveries that forest ecologists can make with these data. There is a ripe opportunity for uncrewed aerial systems (UAS) to contribute to ecology through forest inventory trait mapping. UAS can help overcome the chall...
Preprint
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Researchers in Earth and environmental science can extract incredible value from high resolution remote sensing data, but these data can be hard to use. Pain free use requires skills from remote sensing and the data sciences that are seldom taught together. In practice, many researchers teach themselves how to use high resolution remote sensing dat...
Article
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Postfire shifts in vegetation composition will have broad ecological impacts. However, information characterizing postfire recovery patterns and their drivers are lacking over large spatial extents. In this analysis, we used Landsat imagery collected when snow cover (SCS) was present, in combination with growing season (GS) imagery, to distinguish...
Article
Full-text available
1.Fire is a powerful ecological and evolutionary force that regulates organismal traits, population sizes, species interactions, community composition, carbon and nutrient cycling, and ecosystem function. It also presents a rapidly growing societal challenge, due to both increasingly destructive wildfires and fire exclusion in fire‐dependent ecosys...

Citations

... Nationwide airborne LiDAR projects span broadly geographic areas which contain various and complex land cover types, forest ecotypes, and tree species (Coops et al., 2016). Some examples of nationwide ALS projects include the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) in the USA (Ordway et al. 2021), the ALS campaign in the Swedish National Mapping Agency, Sweden (Nilsson et al. 2017), and the ALS collected in permanent field plots of national forest inventories in Norway (Hauglin et al. 2021). Yet, directly using ALS for global or near-global forest structure measurement is still challenging (Lang, Schindler, and Dirk Wegner 2019). ...
... For example, metropolitan areas such as Miami, New York, Boston, Houston, Los Angeles, and San Francisco contain high numbers of structures and high structure density in SLR zones and are thus highly exposed to coastal hazards. The South Atlantic and Florida continue to add structures at high rates and have a larger relative exposure than other divisions, despite being at high risk of natural hazards (i.e., hurricanes; Fig 5D) [24,60]. This result is particularly critical given that there is a high probability of hurricanes in southern Florida [60,61] and high susceptibility to flooding due to low elevation [62]. ...
... In contrast, both Talucci et al. (2019) and Werner et al. (2019) identified negative relationships with between snow accumulation and conifer seedling recruitment. Vanderhoof et al. (2021) and Vanderhoof and Hawbaker (2018) illustrated that snow cover was the main predictor of evergreen versus deciduous post-fire forest regeneration. However, none of these studies evaluated both pre-and post-fire snow-vegetation relationships, which are critical for understanding how fire and climate change are modifying these fundamental relationships. ...
... Wildland fires (wildfires and prescribed fires) have been investigated for their terrestrial biophysical and atmospheric physiochemical impacts, but recent research that shows they are sources of bioaerosols (i.e., microbes and biogenic particulates) implies that fire may play roles in biological dissemination, microbial dispersal, and atmospheric processes [1][2][3]. The potential role of smoke as a vector to transport viable microbes challenges the concept that the immediate ecological effects of a wildland fire are predominantly confined to its perimeter [2][3][4][5]. Studies of lowintensity prescribed fires indicate that viable microbes emitted in smoke from biomass burning are both quantitatively and qualitatively different from the bioaerosols observed in ambient, smoke-free air [2,6], implying that wildland fire may be a previously unrecognized mechanism for biological dispersal. ...