Megan A. Carney's research while affiliated with Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University and other places

Publications (19)

Article
This article introduces the feminist praxis of duoethnography as a way to examine the COVID era. As a group of diverse, junior, midcareer, and senior feminist scholars, we developed a methodology to critically reflect on our positions in our institutions and social worlds. As a method, duoethnography emphasizes the dialogical intimacy that can form...
Article
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Social and political policy, human activities, and environmental change affect the ways in which microbial communities assemble and interact with people. These factors determine how different social groups are exposed to beneficial and/ or harmful microorganisms, meaning microbial exposure has an important socio-ecological justice context. Therefor...
Article
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Humans are inextricably linked to each other and our natural world, and microorganisms lie at the nexus of those interactions. Microorganisms form genetically flexible, taxonomically diverse, and biochemically rich communities, i.e., microbiomes that are integral to the health and development of macroorganisms, societies, and ecosystems. Yet engage...
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The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic introduced unique challenges to teaching at the university level, while also heightening awareness of existing social and health disparities as these shaped interactions and influenced learning outcomes in class settings. Based on ethnographic and autoethnographic data, this article reflects on teach...
Article
Full-text available
Humans are inextricably linked to each other and our natural world, and microorganisms lie at the nexus of those interactions. Microorganisms form genetically flexible, taxonomically diverse, and biochemically rich communities, i.e., microbiomes that are integral to the health and development of macroorganisms, societies, and ecosystems. Humans are...
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Full-text available
Global climate change and the continued neoliberalization of food systems have exacerbated levels of food insecurity and hunger, producing an ever-expanding population of displaced persons who are also nutritionally vulnerable. Restrictive immigration policies in post-arrival and resettlement contexts compound with other cultural, social, political...
Article
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The Lancet Commissions are widely known as aspirational pieces, providing the mechanisms for consortia and networks of researchers to organize, collate, interrogate and publish around a range of subjects. Although the Commissions are predominantly led by biomedical scientists and cognate public health professionals, many address social science ques...
Article
Over the past couple of years, the University of Arizona has launched both a new under­graduate degree program in Food Studies and a Center for Regional Food Studies (CRFS). The mission of the CRFS is “to integrate social, behavioral, and life sciences into interdisciplinary studies and community dialogue regarding change in regional food systems....
Technical Report
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The mission of the Center for Regional Food Studies is to integrate social, behavioral, and life sciences into interdisciplinary studies and community dialogue regarding change in regional food systems. We involve students and faculty in the design, implementation, and evaluation of pilot interventions and participatory community-based research in...
Article
In this article, we highlight findings from ethnographic research on dietary health interventions with low-income Latino im/migrant populations in the Central Coast of California. We discuss the assumptions underpinning different models of nutrition intervention and education, as well as what these assumptions suggest about common perceptions of La...
Article
Attention to culinary care can enrich the framing of health within medical anthropology. We focus on care practices in six Latin American kitchens to illuminate forms of health not located within a singular human subject. In these kitchens, women cared not for individuals but for meals, targeting the health of families and landscapes. Many medical...
Article
In this article, I examine the various meanings of Mexican and Central American migrant women's utilization of private food assistance programs. I present findings from 20 months of ethnographic fieldwork conducted between 2008 and 2011 with migrant women, public health workers, and staff and volunteers of food assistance programs in Santa Barbara...
Article
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In this article, I utilize a political ecology of the body (PEB) approach to analyze women's transnational migration and their experiences with 'food insecurity.' I situate this analysis within a tradition of feminist political ecology, seeking to advance a 'postcolonial intersectionality' that is attentive to gender, race, and class as axes of pow...
Article
For years now, the United States has faced an "obesity epidemic" that, according to the dominant narrative, is harming the nation by worsening the health burden, raising health costs, and undermining productivity. Much of the responsibility is laid at the foot of Blacks and Latinos, who have higher levels of obesity. Latinos have provoked particula...

Citations

... Very important work on microbes and the microbiome has already been initiated in a variety of research fields of the humanities (Greenhough et al., 2020), but first and foremost in the area of medical ethics and medical history (D'Abramo & Neumeyer, 2020;Berg et al. 2020;Cañada et al. 2022;Formosinho et al. 2022;Hoffmann 2019;Ishaq et al. 2021;Kling 2019;Ma et al. 2018;Marchesi and Ravel 2015;Mathias 2018;McGuire et al. 2012;O'Doherty et al. 2016;Pitlik and Koren 2017;Prescott 2017;Rhodes 2016;Rhodes et al. 2013;Robinson et al. 2022;Smith 2020;Wilkinson et al. 2021;Woodworth et al., 2017). 2 Because microorganisms constitute an essential foundation for the functioning and flourishing of all other forms of life on the planet (Cockell, 2004, 2005, Lorimer, 2016, 2017aLorimer, 2017b), they are predestined for the research scope of a wide range of disciplines of the environmental humanities. Crucial to the environmental understanding of the microbiome is the deep interconnection of humans and the microbes living in and on them, the intricate entanglements of microbes and all living beings, and microbes' fundamental importance for the existence of all ecosystems. ...
... Already, advances in microbiome science are indicating that external "ecosystems" (e.g., those that propagate unacceptable socioeconomic inequities, or those that control food policy, and the distribution/marketing of unhealthy products) can be manifest in the internal ecosystems of the human gastrointestinal tract. [135][136][137] Thus, in addition to adding to exposome science, the microbiome and its associated dysbiosis is both an objective marker and metaphor for "life in distress" at community and even global scales. 138 If exposome science fulfils its promise, it will contribute to transforming how we measure and ultimately shape healthy, equitable, sustainable, and flourishing environments. ...
... We are researchers, educators, practitioners, and policymakers spanning the globe and career levels. While the term "microbes and social equity" is novel, this concept has previously entered academic and public discourse (10,(36)(37)(38)(39)(40)(41)(42)(43). We gratefully acknowledge these previous efforts to situate natural sciences within sociopolitical contexts. ...
... This work acknowledges technical measures of nutrition may also omit the complex socio-political and environmental processes by which food and nutrition are derived, which can also be critical to perceptions of food and health ). As such, research suggests food and nutrition security programs can often overlook the needs of historically marginalized communities, and that overly narrow approaches to conceptualizing nutrition can exacerbate both social and health inequities (Fazzino and Loring 2016;Gálvez et al. 2020;Kimura et al. 2014;Narayanan and Rao 2019). ...
... Furthermore, the latest projections suggest an increase in the proportion of hungry people in SSA due to COVID-19 [1]. Other causes of this increase are wars and insecurity as well as refugee relocations that have increased during this decade [22,23]. SSA is also a region that is particularly sensitive to climate change and is prone to droughts, which makes it more difficult for people to access food (increasing soil pressure, difficulty accessing water . . . ) [24,25]. ...
... While critical nutrition work initially focused on understanding the social and biocultural implications of nutritional knowledge in high-income countries, scholars have increasingly started to explore these themes in the global South (Burnett et al. 2020;Denham and Gladstone 2020;Ham 2020;Kimura 2013;Nichols 2015Nichols , 2020Yates-Doerr 2015, among others). This research has yielded several key insights that help to contextualize why food and nutrition interventions within marginalized communities residing in the global South often produce only middling levels of impact. ...
... The core roles of women in communities are such that they develop valuable knowledge on climate change concerns and approaches for mitigation and adaptation in terms of climate fluctuations and change (UNISDR 2008;Carney 2014). It has become evident that women's social responsibilities have enhanced their regular engagement with the natural environment, such that they are well placed to perceive changes in the environment. ...
... However, a lack of food literacy among food-insecure households should not be assumed. Research on dietary health and social exclusion among Latino im/migrants in California found that nutrition education programs targeting these im/migrants were premised on a lack of diet-related knowledge and in doing so, overlooked im/migrant food-related knowledge, income-related limitations, and reproduced social exclusions (Minkoff-Zern and Carney 2015). ...
... The theory of planned behaviour which is regularly used in the development of public health interventions, states that individual behaviour is driven by behaviour intentions which in turn are dependent on three factors, personal attitudes, an individual's perception of the attitudes of others (family and friends) and the individual's behavioural control, which is a balance of internal and external factors [13]. This theory, however is "most predictive amongst the young, fit and affluent and when predicting self-reported behaviour over a short term" ( [14], p3) and may therefore be of limited value in predicting long term behaviour change in mothers from disadvantaged areas, particularly when individuals are not suffering from ill health as a result of their behaviours, and when upstream factors are preventing behaviour change [15]. ...
... Over time, chronic social conditions fluctuate to shape the functioning and capabilities of people grappling with mortality, morality, meaning, and action as part of daily routines of survival (Vigh 2008). Chronicity theory here moves beyond clinical matters of disease management and health care toward diverse sociocultural manifestations and places of distress and injustice (Heinemann 2015;Read and Geest 2019;Yates-Doerr and Carney 2016). ...