Mauri Paloheimo's research while affiliated with University of Turku and other places

Publications (5)

Article
Full-text available
Purpose: This study investigates how game design, which divides players into static teams, can reinforce group polarisation. The authors study this phenomenon from the perspective of social identity in the context of team-based location-based games, with a focus on game slang. Design and method: The authors performed an exploratory data analysis...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Location-based games (LBGs), where the user's physical location is a central part of gameplay, have become popular since the commercial success of Pokémon Go. The extant literature has focused to explain the success of LBGs by focusing on aspects of gratification and reasons to start, continue and quit playing. This study departs from the previous...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Player communities in the location-based games Pokémon GO and Ingress differ from most online multiplayer game communities in two major ways: (1) Interaction between players occurs mostly face-to-face and (2) teams are static, for example, currently in Pokémon GO, changing teams is possible only once a year. In addition, much of the interaction bet...
Chapter
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Crowdsourcing has emerged as a cost-efficient solution for companies to resolve certain tasks requiring vast amounts of human input. In order to motivate participants to harness their best efforts for the crowdsourcing task, companies are gamifying or creating complete games around crowdsourcing problems. The location-based game Ingress integrated...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Studies on location-based games ubiquitously report positive learning outcomes for the players. Particularly these games are shown to promote exercise, encourage to social interaction and increase geographical and cartographical knowledge. To find out whether these positive effects are game-specific or characteristic to all location-based games, we...

Citations

... Players navigate to specific real world locations to access content in the game, connecting LBGs to geographical locations (Colley et al., 2017;de Souza e Silva et al., 2021;Schaal, 2020;Tregel et al., 2021Tregel et al., , 2022. LBGs such as Pok emon GO also have multiplayer game mechanics, which influence player behaviour (Riar et al., 2020;Laato et al., 2021a). According to Cho et al. (2011), social networks shape, transform and direct human geographical movement, and thus, location-related movement in LBGs and location-based IT should be understood in the social context (Fonseca et al., 2022;Saker and Evans, 2020). ...
... A team or player may capture and defend Gyms to assert dominance over a location. In addition to the inherent rewards of digital ownership [37,69], players also receive benefits in the form of digital currency for maintaining control of the location [47]. Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly 82% of global consumers have either played games or watched video game content [48]. ...
... Some LBGs such as Orna and The Walking Dead: Our World provide in-game chats for players. However, not all players use this and may still prefer to communicate through other online sources including Reddit [61], Telegram and WhatsApp [62]. ...
... Moreover, as the aims of Human Pacman and AR Car Game are mainly about research and development in university laboratories, there is no revenue data available publicly. For Niantic Inc.'s Ingress, according to [6], the approximately generated revenue in July 2019 is 20,000 USD for one month. Their revenue has exponentially increased when Niantic Inc. launched Pokémon Go which is a game sharing the same location data as Ingress. ...
... The concept of Playable City emerges from the integration of playful experiences in the smart city to move from a sheer data-centric to a human-centric perspective aiming at making cities more enjoyable and humanized [23]. Since the concept was coined at the Pervasive Media Studio in Bristol to refer to artistic projects [18], many experiences have been proposed to improve urban spaces' knowledge and connect citizens amongst them or with the city itself [3,7,12,13,21,26]. Playable cities use the urban spaces as scenarios to play games to promote specific behaviors, attitudes, or interests. ...