Matthew J. Hertenstein's research while affiliated with DePauw University and other places

Publications (19)

Article
While trait positive emotionality and state positive-valence affect have long been the subject of intense study, the importance of differentiating among several “discrete” positive emotions has only recently begun to receive serious attention. In this article, we synthesize existing literature on positive emotion differentiation, proposing that the...
Article
How do extreme degrees of positive emotion-such as those characteristic of mania-influence emotion perception? The present study investigated how mania proneness, assessed using the Hypomanic Personality Scale, influences the perception of emotion via touch. Using a validated dyadic interaction paradigm for communicating emotion through touch (Hert...
Article
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This study investigated the hypothesis that different emotions are most effectively conveyed through specific, nonverbal channels of communication: body, face, and touch. Experiment 1 assessed the production of emotion displays. Participants generated nonverbal displays of 11 emotions, with and without channel restrictions. For both actual producti...
Article
We reanalyzed a data set consisting of a U.S. undergraduate sample (N = 212) from a previous study (Hertenstein et al. 2006a) that showed that touch communicates distinct emotions between humans. In the current reanalysis, we found that anger was communicated at greater-than-chance levels only when a male comprised at least one member of a communic...
Article
Camras and Shutter persuasively argue for the complexity of infant emotional displays and provide evidence in opposition to some of the central claims of Differential Emotions Theory (DET). I discuss two points of caution to the study of emotion that are implicitly raised by the target article and describe briefly directions for research in the fie...
Article
The study of emotional communication has focused predominantly on the facial and vocal channels but has ignored the tactile channel. Participants in the current study were allowed to touch an unacquainted partner on the whole body to communicate distinct emotions. Of interest was how accurately the person being touched decoded the intended emotions...
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Full-text available
Based on social–functional accounts of emotion, we conducted two studies examining whether the degree to which people smiled in photographs predicts the likelihood of divorce. Along with other theorists, we posited that smiling behavior in photographs is potentially indicative of underlying emotional dispositions that have direct and indirect life...
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Full-text available
In a sample composed of 162 young adults, we examined the generalizability of an orthogonal, 2-component model of forgiveness previously reported by Ross, Kendall, Matters, Rye, and Wrobel (2004). Furthermore, we examined the relationship of these two components with maladaptive personality characteristics as measured by the Schedule for Nonadaptiv...
Article
The study of emotional signaling has focused almost exclusively on the face and voice. In 2 studies, the authors investigated whether people can identify emotions from the experience of being touched by a stranger on the arm (without seeing the touch). In the 3rd study, they investigated whether observers can identify emotions from watching someone...
Article
Although touch is one of the most neglected modalities of communication, several lines of research bear on the important communicative functions served by the modality. The authors highlighted the importance of touch by reviewing and synthesizing the literatures pertaining to the communicative functions served by touch among humans, nonhuman primat...
Article
This study examines the factor structure of scores on the English-language version of the Structure of Temperament Questionnaire. Scores from 300 college students were subjected to maximum-likelihood confirmatory factor analyses (CFA). A first-order model consisting of eight correlated factors and a second-order model consisting of two superordinat...
Article
The goal of this investigation was to study the regulatory retention effects of an adult's emotional displays on infant behavior. In Study 1, 11- and 14-month-old infants were tested in a social-referencing-like paradigm in which a 1-hr delay was imposed between the exposure trials and the test trial. In Study 2, 11-month-olds were tested in the sa...
Article
Emotions serve a wide range of important social functions, including the regulation of interpersonal relationships. Positive emotions, although understudied, are particularly critical to the formation and maintenance of social bonds. This chapter presents a framework for understanding the social functions of positive emotion, associating specific p...
Article
The communicative functions that the tactile modality serves in infancy have been severely neglected by researchers. The present article highlights the importance of touch by addressing two questions. First, what is communicated to infants by touch from their caregivers? In addition to the common notion that touch regulates arousal levels, it is ar...
Article
The study of emotion elicitation in the caregiver-infant dyad has focused almost exclusively on the facial and vocal channels, whereas little attention has been given to the contribution of the tactile channel. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of touch on infants' emotions. During the time that objects were presented to the dyad...
Article
Full-text available
The commentators on our target article have raised some excellent points relative to our article, and we are gratified to see the generally positive tone of the replies. All of the commentators have offered overall support for our framework, although there are differences of opinion with us on some issues. Because the commentaries raised questions...
Article
Full-text available
The onset of locomotion heralds one of the major life transitions in early development and involves a pervasive set of changes in perception, spatial cognition, and social and emotional development. Through a synthesis of published and hitherto unpublished findings, gathered from a number of converging research designs and methods, this article pro...
Article
This study examined the degree to which specific properties of maternal touch may be associated with a low birth weight infant’s security of attachment at one year of age, considering the potential modifying effects of maternal sensitivity and history of touch as well as infant gender and biological vulnerability. One hundred and thirty one sociocu...

Citations

... Whereas our account proposes quantitative definitions mostly for a few primary emotions, a substantial body of work has developed more detailed categorizations of secondary emotions (Cowen et al., 2019;Jarymowicz & Imbir, 2015;Keltner, 2019;Shiota et al., 2017). These include emotions like guilt, jealousy, pride, gratitude, and love, which are often thought of as subtypes of the primary emotions. ...
... Apart from the rapid maturation of the cortex, increased attention has been given to the link between locomotor experience and development in advancing psychological functions in infancy (Bertenthal & Campos, 1990;Gilmore et al., 2004;Higgins et al., 1996;James & Swain, 2011;Kermoian & Campos, 1988;Uchiyama et al., 2008;Ueno et al., 2018;Walle & Campos, 2014). In addition to EEG studies providing evidence of cortical reorganization after the onset of self-produced locomotion as good examples of brain plasticity in early development (Bell & Fox, 1996;Corbetta et al., 2014), several lines of evidence have demonstrated the onset of self-produced locomotion to bring about developmental change (e.g., Bertenthal & Campos, 1990;Campos et al., 2000). When infants acquire the first locomotor skill, typically crawling, it dramatically changes the relationship between the infant and the environment. ...
... Generally, indicators used in CFA include standardized root mean square residual (SRMR) and root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA), which are recommended to be lower than 0.08 while comparative fit index (CFI) should be higher than 0.9 to indicate acceptable goodness of fit [48]. Thus, CFA is appropriate to facilitate hypothesized-model testing, comparison, and improvement [49]. The reliability of each factor was calculated in the form of Cronbach's α. ...
... While defined to a degree, we are still deciphering those physical contact attributes vital to social touch communication. In such settings, human touch interactions tend to include gesture, pressure/depth, velocity, acceleration, location, frequency, area, and duration (Hertenstein, 2002;Hertenstein et al., 2006;Hertenstein et al., 2009;Yohanan and MacLean, 2012;Silvera-Tawil et al., 2014;Jung et al., 2015;Andreasson et al., 2018;Hauser et al., 2019a;Hauser et al., 2019b;Lo et al., 2021;McIntyre et al., 2021). To understand the functional importance of specific movement patterns, certain attributes such as spatial hand velocity have been further decomposed into directions of normal and tangential (Hauser et al., 2019a) or forward-backward and left-right (Lo et al., 2021). ...
... However, several features of the paradigm increase our confidence in the findings (Hertenstein et al. 2006a). In most previous judgment studies, observers judged highly prototypical displays or those posed by actors, whereas in our study people decoded emotion from the idiosyncratic tactile actions of other untrained participants (see Hertenstein 2010 for a discussion regarding bottom-up approaches to emotion; also, see Clynes and Nettheim (1982) for a unique approach to studying button-pressing and the association of some emotions). Second, our response format included the response option none of these terms are correct, which reduced the likelihood of inflated accuracy rates (Frank and Stennett 2001). ...
... Love has been defined as an emotion experienced during closeness or reunion with an attachment figure, serving the function of social bonding (Bowlby, 1979;Shiota et al., 2004Shiota et al., , 2007. It has been theorized that love motivates moving closer to another in social space, seeking connectedness and supporting relationships (Campos et al., 2013;Roseman, 2013;Shiota et al., 2014;Smith et al., 2014). ...
... Functionalist theory. While discrete theories hold that joy resides within the individual, functionalist and dynamic theories argue that joy and other emotions exist in the relationship of the child to the social surround (Barrett, 1993;Campos, Mumme, Kermoian, & Campos, 1994;Witherington, Campos, & Hertenstein, 2001). Functionalist perspectives emphasize the adaptive role of happiness and joy in creating and maintaining relationships with social partners throughout development. ...
... Subsequent structural changes in the nervous system lead to changes in function and behavior and functional changes result in changes in structure [18]. This continuous bidirectional interaction between biological and experiential events cannot be reduced to either organism or environment [64]. Newell [11] adds that it is the interaction between the person, the environment, and the task that changes our movements, including how we develop and learn new movements. ...
... Acción y percepción se influyen y transforman de forma bidireccional, modificando al mismo tiempo el contexto en el que tienen lugar (Noë, 2004). En lo que respecta a la etapa infantil, precisamente las diferentes formas de interacción de las que el niño participa han sido destacadas por numerosos autores como un importante elemento en su progresiva comprensión del mundo y en el desarrollo de la regulación afectiva (Hertenstein y Campos, 2001;Thelen, Schöner, Scheier y Smith, 2001). El contacto corporal se erige, así, como una vía básica de comunicación entre el niño y los adultos, contribuyendo a la regulación entre ambos (Hertenstein, 2002). ...
... Second, this study expands the scope of the literature on facial expressions presented in still images by testing the perception valences (positive/negative) of smiles of different intensities (Hertenstein et al., 2009). We present new findings that depart from the consensus, which suggests that smiles mainly have positive social effects. ...