Masato Ono's research while affiliated with Tamagawa University and other places

Publications (29)

Article
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Some aphid species produce a soldier caste with enlarged forelegs and horns (weapons). It has been hypothesised that the evolution of morphological specialization by soldiers in social aphids is accelerated by high predation pressure, but this possibility has not been tested. Here, we investigated the relationship between local predator abundance a...
Article
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Background The Japanese honeybee, Apis cerana japonica , shows a specific defensive behavior, known as a “hot defensive bee ball,” used against the giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia . Hundreds of honeybee workers surround a hornet and make a “bee ball” during this behavior. They maintain the ball for around 30 min, and its core temperature can reach 4...
Article
Intercolony drifting of the Japanese paper wasp, Polistes rothneyi Cameron, was observed using individual color marking of workers. No genetic relatedness was found by using microsatellite markers between drifting workers and the recipient colony. Genetic analysis of brood in the recipient colony revealed reproduction by non‐kin drifting worker(s)...
Article
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Honey bees and bumble bees belong to the same family (Apidae) and their workers exhibit a division of labor, but the style of division of labor differs between species. The molecular and neural bases of the species-specific social behaviors of Apidae workers have not been analyzed. Here, we focused on two immediate early genes, hormone receptor 38...
Article
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Asian honeybees (Apis cerana) have evolved a thermal collective defense against the sympatric giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia) in which workers surround the predator en masse and produce heat up to 46 °C to kill it. This characteristic behavior is called “hot defensive bee ball formation.” Many studies have described the uniqueness and efficiency of...
Article
Gynandromorphy, which is characterized by the coexistence of male and female tissues in a single individual, is known in insects. Gynandromorphs exhibit diverse levels of defects in sexual behavior. The distribution pattern of both sexes within the nervous systems could be responsible for these differences in behavioral traits; however, most studie...
Article
Lone Bombus ignitus queens are known to start nests in small underground cavities. To examine the nest-site preference of post-hibernating queens, choice tests were carried out by providing queens with orphan colonies and empty cavities as possible nesting sites within an experimental box. Our results showed that the queens had a strong preference...
Article
The Japanese honeybee, Apis cerana japonica Radoszkowski, uses unique generation of heat by bee-balling to defend against, overheat and kill predacious Japanese hornets. We have now observed the European honeybee, Apis mellifera Linnaeus, using similar bee-balling behavior and heat generation against the Japanese yellow hornet, Vespa simillima xant...
Article
A society of bumble bees is primitively eusocial, with an annual life cycle, and can be used as a physiological model of social bees for comparative studies with highly eusocial hymenopterans. We investigated the dynamics of biogenic amine levels in the brain, meso-metathoracic ganglia, terminal abdominal ganglion, and hemolymph in queens 1 day aft...
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In insect brains, the mushroom bodies (MBs) are a higher-order center for sensory integration and memory. Honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) MBs comprise four Kenyon cell (KC) subtypes: class I large-, middle-, and small-type, and class II KCs, which are distinguished by the size and location of somata, and gene expression profiles. Although these subtyp...
Article
To explore the role of the volatiles emitted from male labial gland (LG) of the bumblebee Bombus ardens ardens, we investigated the responses of virgin queens and males to volatiles using a gas chromatography–electroantennographic detector (GC–EAD) system and Y-tube olfactometer. GC–EAD analysis revealed that citronellol, the main compound detected...
Article
Previous reports note that males of the Japanese bumblebee Bombus ardens ardens perform nest surveillance to mate with new queens. Here, we report that males of this species also perform patrolling and scent-marking for mating. We observed that many B. ardens ardens males fly together from May to June in circular paths through a wooded area in Toky...
Article
The rewarding orchid, Cremastra appendiculata (Orchidaceae), has a strong floral scent and is pollinated by long-tongued bumble bee queens ( Bombus diversus tersatus Smith; Hymenoptera: Apidae). The response of queens of B. diversus tersatus to the scent of C. appendiculata was investigated using a gas chromatography–electroantennographic detector...
Article
Specific genes quickly transcribed after extracellular stimuli without de novo protein synthesis are known as immediate early genes (IEGs) and are thought to contribute to learning and memory processes in the mature nervous system of vertebrates. A recent study revealed that the homolog of Early growth response protein-1 (Egr-1), which is one of th...
Article
We identified mermithid nematodes infecting a post-hibernating Japanese bumblebee (Bombus pseudobaicalensis Vogt) queen in Nemuro, Hokkaido, Japan. The infected queen did not lay eggs or feed on pollen during laboratory rearing. In addition, the queen usually crawled under the straw set in the rearing box, which differed from the typical behavior o...
Article
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Gynandromorphy that has both male and female features is known in many insect orders, including Hymenoptera. In most cases, however, only external morphology and behavioral aspects have been studied. We found a gynandromorph of bumblebee, Bombus ignitus, that showed almost bilateral distribution of external sexual traits, with male characters obser...
Article
The epiparasitic plant Monotropastrum humile (D. Don) Hara is pollinated by workers of the long-tongued bumblebee, Bombus diversus diversus (Smith). The interaction between the floral scents of this plant and bumblebee was investigated using electrophysiological and behavioral techniques. Three components (linalool, α-terpineol and geraniol) elicit...
Data
Neural activity in the caudal part of the brain during bee ball formation. (A) Schematic diagram of a lateral view of a bee brain. The green line indicates the position of sections that correspond to a more caudal part of the brain. (B) Schematic representation of the Acks signals detected in the right brain hemisphere of the workers that formed th...
Data
Neural activity in the more rostral part of the brain during bee ball formation. (A) Schematic diagram of the lateral view of a bee brain. The green line indicates the position of sections that correspond to a more rostral part of the brain. (B) Schematic representation of the Acks signals detected in the right brain hemisphere of the workers that...
Article
Full-text available
Anti-predator behaviors are essential to survival for most animals. The neural bases of such behaviors, however, remain largely unknown. Although honeybees commonly use their stingers to counterattack predators, the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica) uses a different strategy to fight against the giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia japonica). Inst...
Article
The volatile components from the labial glands of males of six Japanese bumblebee species were analyzed and compared. Clear species-specificity was found. Ethyl dodecanoate was identified as the major component from the glands of Bombus (Bombus) hypocrita hypocrita and Bombus (Bombus) hypocrita sapporoensis while dihydrofarnesal and dihydrofarnesol...
Article
A method to promote flower visiting by honeybees Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera; Apidae) on eggplants was examined by conditioning honeybees to associate eggplant floral scents with sugar-water rewards. The fragrance components of eggplant floral scents were analyzed by coupling solid-phase micro-extraction techniques and gas chromatography-mass sp...
Article
To stabilize the flower-visiting activity of honeybees, Apis mellifera, in unheated, semi-forced eggplant culture, the effect of pollen amount was investigated using two experiments. In the first experiment, the start and number of days that honeybees spent in flower-visiting activity on eggplants was compared in two greenhouses with different amou...
Article
Full-text available
We previously identified a novel insect picorna-like virus, termed Kakugo virus (KV), from the brains of aggressive worker honeybees that had counterattacked a giant hornet. To survey the prevalence of KV in worker populations engaged in various labors, we quantified KV genomic RNA. KV was detected specifically from aggressive workers in some colon...
Article
The effectiveness of using the European honeybee Apis mellifera as pollinators of eggplants in greenhouses was examined by analyzing foraging behavior on flowers and the effects of pollination. Foraging honeybees were observed to move the tips of eggplant anthers up and down repeatedly using their forelegs and mouthparts, create pollen loads on the...
Article
This chapter describes the identification and characterization of Kakugo virus and discusses the possible relationship between viral infection and aggressive honeybee behavior. Other animal viruses that are thought to be related to the aggressive behaviors of the host have also been discussed. To examine the relationship between Kakugo virus infect...
Article
Full-text available
To identify candidate genes involved in the aggressive behavior of worker honeybees, we used the differential display method to search for RNAs exclusively detected in the brains of aggressive workers that had attacked a hornet. We identified a novel, 10,152-nucleotide RNA, termed Kakugo RNA. Kakugo RNA encodes a protein of 2,893 amino acid residue...
Article
Up to 74 people die each year in Japan after being stung by Hymenopteran insects, with hornets (Vespa spp.) being among the worst offenders. Here we identify a volatile, multi-component alarm pheromone in the venom of the world's largest hornet, V. mandarinia, and use field bioassays to show that 2-pentanol is its principal active component, and th...

Citations

... Also, heat resistance was found in Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 (MRJP1) Oligomer (Moriyama et al., 2015). Moreover, the heat characteristic of Apis cerana and Apis mellifera worker bees provides a specific defensive behavior ("hot defensive bee ball") used against the giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia (Kamioka et al., 2022). Hundreds of worker bees surrounded a hornet and made a "bee ball" where the temperature can reach up to 45-46℃ and it maintains the ball for around 20-30 minutes (Ono et al., 1987;Ken et al., 2005;Kamioka et al., 2022). ...
... IEGs are efficient markers of neural activity as they are transcribed transiently and rapidly in response to specific stimulations inducing neural activity without de novo protein synthesis (Clayton, 2000;Minatohara et al., 2015;Bahrami and Drabløs, 2016). Three IEGs were quantified on the basis of numerous reports that associated them with foraging and orientation activities (Kiya and Kubo, 2011;Shah et al., 2018;Singh et al., 2018;Ugajin et al., 2018;Iino et al., 2020): kakusei, a nuclear non-coding RNA (Kiya et al., 2007), the hormone receptor 38 gene (Hr38), a component of the ecdysteroid signaling pathway (Fujita et al., 2013), and the early growth response gene-1 (Egr1), which is a major mediator and regulator of synaptic plasticity and neuronal activity (Duclot and Kabbaj, 2017). We found that color learning in the 3D VR environment was associated with an upregulation of Egr1 in the calyces of the mushroom bodies (Geng et al., 2022), a main structure of the insect brain repeatedly associated with the storage and retrieval of olfactory memories (Heisenberg, 2003;Menzel, 2012). ...
... These workers rapidly raise the temperature inside the ball, which can reach 46 °C, higher than the lethal temperature of the hornet, and they maintain the ball for around 30 min [51,65,66]. Using this balling behavior, honeybees can effectively kill the hornet while many workers survive [29,51,65], although the exposure to high heat during the bee ball affects the viability of A. cerana japonica [77]. Thus, the hot defensive bee ball is a specific thermoregulatory behavior that produces and maintains a dangerous temperature even for this species. ...
... The oldest observations date from 1853 and were reviewed by Wheeler (1903). Other cases in the order have been reported in the families Agaonidae (Pereira et al. 2003), Apidae (Engels 2007;Lucia et al. 2009;Aamidor et al. 2018;Matsuo et al. 2018), Diprionidae (Martini et al. 1999), Eumenidae (Turrisi and Borsato 2008), Halictidae (Krichilsky et al. 2020), and Mutillidae (Turrisi and Foucart 2008). ...
... Further study and more field data are needed to answer these questions, but a field study on Bombus ignitus (Smith) in Japan seem to support the idea of a fitness advantage of facultative usurpation. When given the choice between orphan nests and empty cavities, queens of B. ignitus had a strong preference for takeover of an orphan colony (Matsumaya and Ono 2018). The same authors also showed that the usurper queens reproduced more quickly and produced more reproductives than nest-making queens. ...
... Commercially reared bumble bee (B. ignitus) colonies were kept in wooden boxes using the procedure described by Sasaki et al. 37,38 . Male pupae were collected from cocoons in 12 queenright colonies. ...
... Although A. mellifera also makes bee balls to defend against hornets [5,26,41,48,50,53], the hornet-killing efficiency of their behavior is lower than that of A. cerana japonica [2]. This low efficiency may be due to the lower temperature produced within the A. mellifera bee ball [29] and/or the higher mortality of workers during balling [69]. ...
... Using established markers we identified olfactory projection neurons (OPN1, OPN2, acj6+) (44), insulin producing neurons (IPC, Ilp2+) (47), and clock neurons (Clk, Dh31+) ( (48) ; Fig. 1C). In MBN we found Kenyon cells, the main component of the mushroom body, and these displayed a diverse clustering pattern (Fig. 1B, green clusters), as found previously (49,50) and overlapped well with data from H. saltator (41) (Figs. 1E, S3A and S3B). ...
... Whilst we have clearly shown a differential response to track Morphology by bumblebees, a significant limitation of our work was that it was only carried out in late summer which meant that we were unable to assess the impact of Morphology on provision of essential early-mid season resources (e.g. suitability for nest construction, and posthibernation and brood-rearing forage), male mate-location 'beats' and pheromone marking sites, and of overwintering habitat (Alford 1969(Alford , 1978Alcock and Alcock 1983;Williams 1991;Streinzer and Spaethe 2014;Harano et al. 2018;Liczner and Colla 2019;Valterová et al. 2019). We were also unable to assess whether disused railways acted as movement corridors, as for other species (Heal 1965) or linear features (Cranmer et al. 2012), and we did not compare the abundance and richness of bumblebees in disused railways with other linear features in the adjacent landscape or examine the impact of the surrounding landscape and connectivity with adjacent field margins. ...
... The research in this field started in Scandinavia [44,75,79], and it was followed by many studies of the Middle and West European bumblebee species later [77,[80][81][82][83][84][85]. Recently, reports on CLG secretion of the South and Central American bumblebees [86,87] as well as of the Japanese species [88,89] were published. At present, the pheromones of more than 80 bumblebee species are known (i.e. ...