Martyn Patel's research while affiliated with Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and other places

Publications (7)

Article
Full-text available
Spatial navigation impairments in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have been suggested to underlie patients experiencing spatial disorientation. Though many studies have highlighted navigation impairments for AD patients in virtual reality (VR) environments, the extent to which these impairments predict a patient’s risk for spatial disorientation in the re...
Article
Background: Spatial disorientation is one of the earliest and most distressing symptoms seen in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and can lead to them getting lost in the community. Although it is a prevalent problem worldwide and is associated with various negative consequences, very little is known about the extent to which outdoor navigation...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Spatial disorientation is one of the earliest and most distressing symptoms seen in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and can lead to them getting lost in the community. Although it is a prevalent problem worldwide and is associated with various negative consequences, very little is known about the extent to which outdoor navigation p...
Article
Getting lost is one of the earliest and most distressing symptoms seen in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Despite being a prevalent problem in the community worldwide, very few studies have explored real‐world environmental factors that may potentially contribute to patients getting lost. In this study, we aim to investigate whether road network structur...
Article
Full-text available
Dementia-related missing incidents are a highly prevalent issue worldwide. Despite being associated with potentially life-threatening consequences, very little is still known about what environmental risk factors may potentially contribute to these missing incidents. The aim of this study was to conduct a retrospective, observational analysis using...
Article
Background: Dementia-related missing incidents are highly prevalent but still poorly understood. This is particularly true for environmental/geospatial risk factors, which might contribute to these missing incidents. Objective: The study aimed to conduct a retrospective, observational analysis on a large sample of missing dementia patient case r...

Citations

... Eighteen studies were identified in this category, and all applied GPS as a space-based technology to gather tracking data in exploring patients' behavior patterns. In most studies, analysis and interpretation of spatial GPS data were used to assess patients' out-of-home behavior [20][21][22][23], mobility patterns [52,53,65,[114][115][116][117], life-space metrics [118,119], and driving behavior [24,25]. In one study, GPS data were used to propose a Bayesian classifier model to estimate the probability of wandering [120]. ...
... In addition to the spatial navigation impairments, previous studies from our group have suggested that certain environmental factors, such as increased outdoor landmark density and complex road network structure, may act as risk factors for spatial disorientation by potentially triggering patients to make navigation errors [18,19]. However, these factors were identified using retrospective police case reports of missing people with dementia, and owing to the unavailability of trajectory data for the missing individuals, the true extent to which these factors contribute to spatial disorientation is unclear. ...
... The results of these VR navigation studies suggest that patients exhibit impairments in the ability to use both egocentric (eye-/head/body-based) and allocentric (map-based) navigation strategies, which is associated with pathology related deficits seen respectively in the parietal and medial temporal lobe structures. Further, impairments in the ability to switch between the two navigation strategies have also been reported in patients 1,14 . ...
... In addition to the spatial navigation impairments, previous studies from our group have suggested that certain environmental factors, such as increased outdoor landmark density and complex road network structure, may act as risk factors for spatial disorientation by potentially triggering patients to make navigation errors [18,19]. However, these factors were identified using retrospective police case reports of missing people with dementia, and owing to the unavailability of trajectory data for the missing individuals, the true extent to which these factors contribute to spatial disorientation is unclear. ...