Martin Dumbach's research while affiliated with Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nürnberg and other places

Publications (30)

Article
Purpose Increasing demographic diversity within societies and workforces causes challenges with regard to the innovation performance of companies. By definition, innovation communities nowadays are composed of members with diverse function background and age diversity. The challenging question is how to manage diverse corporate innovation communiti...
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In this dissertation, I have investigated antecedents of social capital in corporate innovation community settings. While extant studies often highlight the importance of communities in innovation processes (Judge et al., 1997; Sawhney & Prandelli, 2000) as well as the beneficial consequences of social capital in such settings (Dahlander & Frederik...
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In this chapter, I present the measures for both exogeneous (the “Big 5” factors as well as intrinsic and extrinsic motivations) and endogeneous (the three dimensions of social capital) variables. As recommended by a number of scholars (e.g., Foss et al., 2010; Kirsch, Ko, & Haney, 2010), extisting scales were used and adapted to the present contex...
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In this chapter, I describe the empirical field data was collected at in order to test the model presented. I organize my arguments in two sections. In section 4.1, I describe the empirical setting of my study, the WIN Innovation Community, and discuss how the WIN Innovation Community conforms to the definition of corporate innovation communities p...
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The aim of my research is to help companies to establish and manage corporate innovation communities successfully to become more innovative. The framework offered in this dissertation suggests that community management is complex and calls for actions on operational as well as executive levels. Related to that, community management is not the task...
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In this chapter, I present methodological aspects related to data collection and analysis. I present data sources within each case including detailed information with regard to interviewee characteristics. The data collection approach differs between the pilot Case A and the four follow up Cases B‐E. In consequence, I present the longitudinal data...
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What are antecedents of social capital in corporate innovation communities? Motivated by numerous studies on the importance of innovation communities in general as well as the pivotal role of social relationships within these settings, I have examined this question using both qualitative as well as quantitative research methods. The research findin...
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This chapter provides an overview of the open innovation literature, which examines innovation processes that integrate both internal as well as external partners to gain access to knowledge, ideas, and other resources (Chesbrough, 2003a; Enkel, Gassmann, & Chesbrough, 2009). As such, many scholars in the context of innovation communities refer to...
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Given the limited scientific understanding of the phenomenon under research in this part of the dissertation, I use a multiple case study approach as proposed by Eisenhardt (1989) and (Yin, 2009). My goal is to “develop pertinent hypotheses and propositions [of antecedents of corporate innovation community social capital] for further inquiry” (Yin,...
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The theoretical background presented within this part of the dissertation highlights both the rising relevance of innovation communities in research and practice (Dahlander & Frederiksen, 2012) as well as the importance of social capital in open innovation settings (Fey & Birkinshaw, 2005). In consequence, a number of scholars on open innovation (N...
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In this chapter, I review the literature on social capital. The core argument of social capital traces back to social network theory and Granovetter, who suggested almost two decades ago that all “attempts [of individuals or organizations] at purposive action are […] embedded in concrete, ongoing systems of social relations” (1985: 487). Influenced...
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Altogether, the theoretical contribution of this dissertation to the literature on innovation communities and social capital is fourfold. This research contributes (1) to the understanding of the self‐reinforcing nature of social capital, (2) to scientific knowledge with regard to the role of individual aspects as antecedents of social capital in c...
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Part III presents the first empirical study I have conducted in order to deal with the research gap presented in the previous part. I used a multiple case study approach (Eisenhardt, 1989) in order to contribute to the literature on antecedents of corporate innovation community social capital. My empirical setting is five innovation communities sup...
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The results and contributions of the studies presented in this dissertation should be considered in the light of a number of limitations. While I have already discussed limitations and future research avenues that are specific to the qualitative and quantitative research approaches presented in part III and IV, respectively, I discuss in this chapt...
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In this chapter, I analyse both fit of the overall model as well as significance of paths within the model, which represents an empirical investigation for support of the hypotheses presented earlier. While software packages available for CBSEM (e.g., AMOS) provide a multitude of estimation methods to researchers, I use maximum likelihood because o...
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This chapter describes the SEM approach applied in this study. I start with a short description of SEM itself and mark out why it is suitable for the research presented in this part. After that, I discuss aspects of exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and model fit, which I apply in the next step to analyze the da...
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Though extant studies on innovative activities and social capital of communities are helpful, one particular outstanding issue remains. As already mentioned, there is consensus in the literature that social capital is a crucial success factor in innovation communities (Dahlander & Frederiksen, 2012; Fleming & Waguespack, 2007). However, relatively...
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Many scholars have examined the role of communities in knowledge sharing (Faraj, Jarvenpaa, & Majchrzak, 2011; Faraj & Johnson, 2011) and innovative activities (Bansemir et al., 2012; Franke & Shah, 2003; Franke, Keinz, & Schreier, 2008). A review of these studies exhibits that scholars differ considerably in their understanding of the term innovat...
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Part II reviews studies that are of particular importance in the context of this dissertation. As presented in part I, this dissertation takes the theoretical lens of social capital and looks at innovation communities as a means to organize boundary crossing innovation processes. In consequence, three literature streams are highly relevant: (1) The...
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In this chapter, I present my hypothesized model. The chapter is organized as follows. First, I present my hypotheses concerning the relationships between different dimensions of social capital. Second, I present my hypotheses for the relationships between the “Big 5” personality traits and structural as well as cognitive community social capital....
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In this section, I present my inductively derived framework, which offers theoretical logic to understand factors that influence the three dimensions of social capital in corporate innovation communities. My sample includes both corporate innovation communities that are restricted to members of the supporting organization (Cases A and B) as well as...
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Part IV builds on the previous part III and focuses on the individual level of community social capital. The model presented here takes a look at personality traits (i.e., the Five Factor Model [FFM]) (Goldberg, 1992) as well as intrinsic and extrinsic motivations (Deci, 1972) to engage in community activities as antecedents of social capital in co...
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In this chapter, I discuss the theoretical foundation of the exogeneous variables of the model. As qualitative data presented in part III indicated, personality is related to structural as well as cognitive social capital and affects the extent to which individuals develop ties and shared visions with other community members. At the same time, qual...
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Similar to other research methods, selection of the empirical basis represents a crucial step in the context of case study research. A central discussion in this context addresses benefits and drawbacks of single versus multiple case study designs. Those who argue for benefits of single case studies often emphasize the advantages to gain deep and r...
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In order to answer the research question raised in the previous chapter, I present two interrelated studies in this dissertation. The first study is a multiple case study as proposed by Eisenhardt (1989). Qualitative data has been collected in five corporate innovation communities supported by different organizations. As recommended by Bogers (2011...
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Recently, the role of communities that engage in innovation activities has received increasing attention in the academic literature (Bansemir, Neyer, & Möslein, 2012; Franke & Shah, 2003). For instance, Füller, Matzler, and Hoppe highlight the role of brand communities in the context of innovation and state: “Members of brand communities are consid...
Book
Because of the specific characteristics of innovation communities, social relationships between community members play a pivotal role for performance in such settings. In response, Martin Dumbach takes a social capital perspective and approaches the research question: What are antecedents of social capital in corporate innovation communities? Using...
Article
This article examines the role of social relations and networks in open innovation settings. Building on extant open innovation literature as well as on social capital theory, we develop a model that conceptualizes social capital as a mediator between the implementation of open innovation instruments and firm performance. In doing so, this paper ad...

Citations

... Finally interviews conducted with participants and key stakeholders at each organization. In several books members of the project reflected subquestions harnessing different approaches (Dumbach 2014;Wendelken et al. 2015;Dornaus et al. 2015;Staples 2017). During the project, numerous PowerPoint slides were shown to academic fellows, participants and managers. ...
... The fast development of new technologies drives the creation and diffusion of new types of corporate entrepreneurship (Oukil, 2011;Nambisan, 2017;Rydehell, 2020) and high technology strategic alliances offer currently many large firms access to technologies, leveraging new innovations and jointly developed knowledge (Powers & Wilson, 2010;Aggarwal & Kapoor, 2018;Clauss & Spieth, 2017;Kilubi, 2016;Roth et al., 2017). Corporate-startup collaboration, as one form of these alliances, is increasingly becoming an attractive strategy to increase corporate entrepreneurship (Weiblen and Chesbrough, 2015;Eriksson et al. 2019;De Groote & Backmann, 2020). ...
... Because of their modular characteristics, semiconductors are often the result of co-development activities. Company C is a perfect example of an orchestrator of a 2.0 OI ecosystem (Curley and Salmelin, 2013) involving partners from the public and private sectors, public research centres and community of users. Company C plays a bridging role among the interests and collaboration of all the other actors, not only remaining embedded in an ecosystem that allowed it to develop competitive advantage, but also securing the success of the whole 2.0 ecosystem. ...
... Social capital is positively related to the innovativeness of a company through the positive links of trust, corporate culture and managerial innovation [53,54]. Birudavolu and Nag consider that some of the key components of innovation in social capital are ambidextrous thinking and intrapreneurship [55,56]. ...
... The results in this study demonstrated that OI activities have a significantly positive influence on reverse-knowledge sharing. These findings are partially in line with prior research that have found that openness within innovation processes positively impacts a company's absorptive ability to capture knowledge from an external environment and enhance knowledge inflows (Chesbrough, 2003a;Chesbrough, 2006;He & Zeng, 2013;Mitchell & Singh, 1992;Rass et al., 2013). Nonetheless, this study serves to endorse prior literature by examining a specific type of active backflow of knowledge (i.e., the reverse knowledge sharing), after the focal SME adopts an OI model. ...
... These two factors were not studies before in a combined framework. Moreover, despite a rational figure of papers on contacts among organizational culture and innovation, as per revealed earlier, tries to combine the undefended innovation model and organization philosophy have been rare (Rass et al., 2013), (Inauen, Schenker-Wicki, 2011), (Laursen, Salter, 2006) & (Katila, Ahuja, 2002) ISSN 2162-4860 2020 ...