Mark Taylor's research while affiliated with The University of Sheffield and other places

Publications (22)

Article
There are significant inequalities in the publicly funded arts sector in England, including significant spatial inequalities. If anything, the critique of spatial inequalities in this ecology do not go far enough. This article uses a unique dataset of the boards of directors of Arts Council England’s national portfolio, derived from Companies House...
Article
Full-text available
How did cultural consumption change during the Covid-19 pandemic? Whilst the impact of the pandemic on cultural production has been given significant attention, work on consumption has seen less attention. This paper addresses this gap in the literature by presenting a comparative analysis of two, nationally representative, surveys of cultural acti...
Article
Recent research on cultural production has drawn attention to significant inequalities. This paper aims to unpack one possible explanation for these inequalities, by focusing on the people with ultimate responsibility for arts institutions: the boards of directors. Using data from the UK’s Companies House, it first analyses the boards of Arts Counc...
Preprint
How did cultural consumption change during the Covid-19 pandemic? Whilst the impact of the pandemic on cultural production has been given significant attention, work on consumption has seen less attention (Roberts 2020 on leisure time notwithstanding). This paper addresses this gap in the literature by presenting a comparative analysis of two, nati...
Chapter
This chapter considers the experience of inequalities in the market for artists’ labour. We focus on visual artists, using interview data from three white female artists from self-described working-class origins. We compare and contrast an early-career artist, one in mid-career, and one later in her working life. The three artists allow the chapter...
Article
Full-text available
Unpaid labour is an important element of how precarity has been theorised. It is also an issue that is often seen as endemic to cultural and creative work. Questions as to the role of unpaid work, including but not limited to unpaid internships, have become central to understanding how the social exclusiveness of many cultural and creative jobs is...
Article
Full-text available
Cultural Studies has drawn attention to the way that cultural and creative industries are marked by significant inequalities. This article explores how these inequalities are maintained, through fieldwork with senior men making decisions in cultural and creative industries. Drawing on 32 interviews with senior men across a range of cultural and cre...
Article
Full-text available
Cultural consumption and production are both characterised by multiple dimensions of inequality. Research in cultural stratification has highlighted the links between the exclusivity of cultural production, the type of cultural works created, and the audiences and public receptions for culture. We contribute to this agenda by examining a hitherto u...
Chapter
This book considers the importance of cultural intermediaries, analysing their role as mitigators of the worst effects of social exclusion and examining the necessity to engage communities with different forms of cultural consumption and production.
Article
Full-text available
Do ticketing data and national survey data on attendance tell the same story? This question is particularly important in the context of debates over the power of new forms of data to supplant the “traditional” survey methods that have underpinned our understanding of the social stratification of culture. This paper compares three data sources on at...
Chapter
This chapter presents an overview of recent work on cultural intermediaries and the ‘creative class’ in relation to social inequality. The chapter looks at Britain’s ‘creative class’ in relation to workforce patterns, tastes, social attitudes, and their faith in the transformative power of culture. Ultimately the chapter suggests we need caution wh...
Preprint
Cultural production is crucial in shaping society. Recent scholarship has drawn attention to the way that the occupations involved with cultural production, brought together under the banner of cultural and creative industries (CCIs), do not reflect the demographics of British society. In particular, research has demonstrated significant exclusions...
Article
Within the growing field of publications on El Sistema and Sistema-inspired programmes around the world, a marked divide can be observed between the findings of critical academic studies and commissioned evaluations. Using evaluations of El Sistema in Venezuela and Aotearoa New Zealand as our principal case studies, we argue that this gulf can be e...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents a new critical engagement with the concept of Cultural and Creative Industries (CCIs), focusing on the rationale for grouping occupations and industries under this label. We show how the definition of ‘creativity’ used to demonstrate CCIs’ economic performance remains contested and variable, particularly with regard to the inc...
Preprint
Cultural and creative industries are currently narrated as one of the greatest forces for openness and social mobility that Britain has (Hancock 2016). However, there is little, if any, evidence to support this position. Recent research has suggested the creative and cultural occupations are dominated by those from professional or managerial backgr...
Article
The attitudes and values of cultural and creative workers are an important element of explaining current academic interest in inequality and culture. To date, quantitative approaches to this element of cultural and creative inequality have been overlooked, particularly in British research. This article investigates the attitudes of those working in...
Book
Full-text available
This report forms part of Panic! It’s an Arts Emergency project, and draws on several academic papers. 2 Those papers, which are all available via the web links in the text, have been written in collaboration with several co-authors. More information can be found in the Introduction and Appendix. The authors commissioned Create London to deliver a...
Preprint
Unpaid or ‘free’ labour is an important element of how precarity has been theorized. It is also an issue that is often seen as endemic to cultural and creative work, rightly attracting a range of criticism. Questions as to the role of unpaid work, for example internships, have become central to understanding the social exclusiveness of many cultura...
Article
In England, the Taking Part Survey is the dominant source of information on participation and its relationship with social stratification. Existing work that investigates state-supported culture implies often large groups of people “not currently engaged” in culture. The scope of this survey allows us to identify not only what else those “highly en...

Citations

... Despite this, those who had traditionally been excluded from the arts, such as people of ethnic minorities and those with health conditions, had similar levels of home-based arts engagement compared to others in the pandemic . However, a parallel study did not find evidence for changes in arts audiences in the UK, suggesting that pre-existing inequalities in arts engagement were maintained (Feder et al., 2021). Although the rapid increase in digital arts activities might reach new audiences, it may also have excluded individuals without access to reliable internet and those unable to use digital technology. ...
... On the one hand, the pandemic has emphasized the importance of culture in (some) citizens' everyday life, both off-and online (e.g., Baldin & Bille 2022;Jeanotte 2021;Tubadji 2021). On the other hand, while the pandemic may have reconfigured cultural participation patterns, it does not seem to have significantly altered existing stratifications in cultural participation (e.g., Blaabaek & Jaeger 2021;Feder et al. 2021). ...
... Golden Globes, the failure to change results in erosion of reputation and boycotts (Pulver, 2021). The privileged white male old guard resist the change towards diversity and inclusion as researchers found (Cobb, Newsinger, and Nwonka, 2020;Brook, O'Brien, and (Meadows, 1994). Canadian government initiatives, such as Ontario's dedicated program for universities to hire black faculty is a correct step forward (Redden, 2020). ...
... In view of the racial and gender inequalities previously documented in the cultural industries (Brook et al., 2018;Brook et al., 2020;Scharff, 2017), and evidence showing that existing inequalities are being exacerbated by the pandemic (Cultivator, 2020;Spiro et al., 2021), it seems possible that individuals who are consistently marginalised in the sector and had learned the skills to demonstrate self-initiative to attain work in the sector pre-pandemic (White, 2017), were also readily able to pivot their practice, and act resourcefully and entrepreneurially when the pandemic hit (even if this meant self-exploitation via unpaid opportunities). Of note, one of our female participants who was from an ethnic minority group set up their own full-time business with colleagues from outside of the sector and reported this as "a weird silver lining" of the pandemic (ID17). ...
... Indeed, families not only transmit economic and cultural resources to youth trajectories (Serracant, 2013), but they also help in job-searches through recommendations and information, which is in many ways linked to their status and social prestige, and with the influence they can exert on other people in the labour market (Vacchiano et al., 2019). Contacts are in fact a source of extraordinary inequality: in many cases it is the ability to access certain social circles that allows young people to access those qualified sectors offering the prospect of a satisfactory job, whether in the cultural industry or other professional fields, despite also being undermined by labour insecurities (Brook et al., 2020). ...
... Although many professionals are enthusiastic about the prospects for exploiting behavioural data, which would allow for detailed analysis of certain niche activities (Hanquinet, O'Brien, and Taylor 2019), these new practices also raise anxieties. They are rejected by some artists as antithetical to their political values and underground positioning (Creton 2018). ...
... They can be embedded in teaching and used for evaluation of learning. Threshold concepts are described as "key ideas, concepts or processes in a discipline that need to be understood by students before they can understand other parts of the subject that follow from them" [104] (p. 14). ...
... Although most workers are likely to be at-risk of socioeconomic adversity during this period, one group who are particularly vulnerable are those employed freelance within the cultural sector. 1 There are a number of reasons for this. First, the fragility of the sector before COVID-19 is widely acknowledged, including the financial precariousness of its workforce and previous susceptibility to economic shocks and recession (de Peuter, 2011;Brook et al., 2018;Banks, 2020). Major socioeconomic transformations in response to COVID-19 are therefore likely to have exacerbated any pre-existing economic vulnerability. ...
... 74 This shift raises the question of the emancipatory potential of 'inequality talk, ' to use Brook et al. 's terminology. 75 One crucial question is: do common accounts of inequalities promote, or hinder, social change? As I show in detail elsewhere, conversations about inequalities do not necessarily lead to political change. ...
... Some jobs are more protected than others, some places will recover faster than others (Drummond), provide greater social security (Viganò) or broader access to financial support (Savage), but some individuals within those jobs also have more opportunities than others to be resilient. Wider research on barriers for diverse creative (Brook et al., 2018;O'Brien and Dent, 2021) also exposes that the reality of creative work within the knowledge economy is much less diverse than we would like to think. Women have been considered extensively within the literature (Conor et al., 2015;Dent, 2020) on creative workers, as a group often exposed to more pressures and undervalued (Shade and Jacobson, 2015). ...